2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
74 members (alexii, anotherscott, BillS728, Animisha, brdwyguy, bob@pei, 19 invisible), 630 guests, and 324 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
#764337 04/06/05 06:33 AM
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
Nunatax Offline OP
500 Post Club Member
OP Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
I had two budgerigars, a male and a female. Yesterday, I found the male on the bottom of the cage. It was dead.
I buried it in our back yard. Maybe I should have taken it to our veterinary because I noticed a grey and viscous liquid coming from its beak but I didn't give it much attention at the time. I'm worried that it had some kind of illness that might affect the female too.
I've thoroughly cleaned the cage today in an attempt to remove possible bacteria.
The female seems fine, still singing, hopping and flying around, though clearly confused that her partner is gone.

I'm also not sure whether to buy a new male or to go for another female. I've read that budgerigars stay with their partner for life, so maybe she'll not accept a new male?


Some can tell you to go to heck in such a manner that you would think you might actually enjoy the trip, but that is far more polite than civil - JBryan
Piano & Music Accessories
#764338 04/06/05 06:48 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 742
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 742
i think jodi is a vet, PM her...


"I don't know much about classical music. For years I thought the Goldberg Variations were something Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg did on their wedding night." Woody Allen
#764339 04/06/05 07:04 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 6,970
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 6,970
I used to have parakeets, and I used to be a vet. I don't know about the mate for life thing - I had two at a time (four total) and replaced the "mate" twice, and they seemed to get along just fine. I have no idea if I had males and females, though. I had green ones, blue ones, and multicolored ones... whome

As far as the vet goes - birds (especially those small ones) can get stressed out really easily while being handled, and sometimes taking them in for an exam pushes them right over the edge (if they are really sick). I had my budgies (along with a cockatiel) when I was in vet school - there was a good bird vet at the school. I took one of my sick birds in for him to look at and it died during it's second treatment. I'm absolutely not trying to discourage you from taking a bird to a good bird vet (you should always consider that option) just trying tell you that it might not have made any difference.

So sorry about your bird. If it were me, I would give the surviving one some time (to make sure it isn't going to get sick) and then get her a new buddy. I'm sure a knowledgeable pet store will know if you should get a male or a female. Good luck!

smile Jodi

#764340 04/06/05 07:09 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
You shouldn't have any problem with a male or a female as the next bird. The only combo that's likely to give you problems would be male-male.

I agree with Jodi on all counts. If you're concerned, get a small light fixture with a bare bulb (25 watt) that you can turn on just outside the cage to keep your existing bird warm. Wait a few days. If she isn't beak-up by then, you're probably fine. As you discovered, birds will get sick very fast--but they will also get better very fast if they are going to.

You can also have a stash of yellow drops (I think it's tetracycline) which at least here in the US is available in a pet store. You put a tiny amount in the bird's water dish (or very carefully down her beak, very carefully, you must know what you are doing). This is only if your bird is already sick. We've pulled a few of our budgies from the jaws of death that way. Some we didn't smile .

#764341 04/06/05 08:44 AM
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 969
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 969
Oops...I though you meant veterans. I'll be leaving now...


Support our troops!
#764342 04/06/05 12:05 PM
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
Nunatax Offline OP
500 Post Club Member
OP Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
Thanks for the tips, Jodi and Nina. smile

A whole afternoon has passed now and she still looks fine. Still trying to remove the swing I installed in the new cage and the mirror... well, it's a miracle it's not broken yet...
Next week I'll get her a new partner.

The male used to stress out sometimes. I remember him having some kind of attack a few times. Whenever I cleaned the cage, I had to be very gently or he'd start flapping his wings violently until it looked like he'd ran out of energy. Then I could just take him in my hand and put him on the bottom of the cage. Usually, everything was back to normal after half an hour.
Come to think of it, I wouldn't be surprised if our cat gave him a fatal scare. She sometimes jumped up against the cage while they were eating.

Well, at least he enjoyed the bigger cage I bought for them for a few weeks. I was surprised he didn't get one of those attacks during the move.

Here's a picture of them in their new cage(click to enlarge) :
[Linked Image]

Jodi, if you look closely you can see that the green one, the male, has a smooth, blue nose. The blue one, the female, has a rough, grey nose. That's the easiest way to distinguish males from females smile


Some can tell you to go to heck in such a manner that you would think you might actually enjoy the trip, but that is far more polite than civil - JBryan
#764343 04/06/05 01:37 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 742
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 742
Quote
Jodi, if you look closely you can see that the green one, the male, has a smooth, blue nose. The blue one, the female, has a rough, grey nose. That's the easiest way to distinguish males from females
now thats the most useful bit of information ive heard all day long.

thank god for piano world...


"I don't know much about classical music. For years I thought the Goldberg Variations were something Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg did on their wedding night." Woody Allen
#764344 04/06/05 01:46 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 7,051
K
7000 Post Club Member
Offline
7000 Post Club Member
K
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 7,051
Cute pic.
I'm a bird person.
I have a very tame Pacific Parrolett that loves to crawl into my shirt and go to sleep.
A perfect pet, very quiet and affectionate yet does not demand attention like many birds that are bonded to their humans.

A friend came to visit with her dog last week.
I covered my birds cage so she would not even see the dog.
Since I keep her in a cage it seems like it is my responsibility to do this.
I'd imagine a bird would have a great deal of fear being trapped in a cage, preventing the natural urge to fly up, when a dog is in the room.

This is also the reason I don't think it is okay to have both cats and birds.
Just one opinion.

#764345 04/06/05 02:59 PM
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
Nunatax Offline OP
500 Post Club Member
OP Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 704
Kenny,

You make a good point.

The story how we got all these pets is funny actually, we never really planned on keeping both a cat AND birds. One evening, a little kitten was meowing at our back door and we took her in. We were able to convince our father to keep her. Ms. Beans had made her entrance into our family.

The birds were here first, and the way they got here is similar. One day, a blue, female budgerigar was in our back yard. They do not live in the wild here normally and the bird was pretty tame, probably escaped somewhere or perhaps even deliberately released. I thought it would not survive out in the open so I caught it and bought a mate to keep it company. After a while the one I had caught died, probably from old age so I bought a new partner for the surviving one.

And a little more than a year ago I caught a tame zebra finch in our back yard... The bird would not have survived out in the open sooo... same scenario: we bought the little fellow a partner... My two younger sisters are taking care of them now...

All I can do is hope that my parakeet has had a good life here, despite the presence of the cat... It was all meant well.


Some can tell you to go to heck in such a manner that you would think you might actually enjoy the trip, but that is far more polite than civil - JBryan
#764346 04/06/05 07:50 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 6,970
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 6,970
Man, Nunatax, those birds look EXACTLY like the first two parakeets I had. Their names were "Blue Guy" and Green Guy" (Although sometimes, I called them "Bob and Sandy" after my boss and his wife.) laugh I have no idea if they were actually guys or not, though. I guess I should dig up some pictures and see if I can see their beaks.

smile Jodi

#764347 04/06/05 08:03 PM
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
T
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
I had a yellow-nape amazon for 11 years. I GAVE him away when we moved to Idaho because I didn't think there would be a tropical bird-vet around here and I knew I was going to be too busy to give him (turned out to be a female) what he needed - which was all my attention all the time. I loved that bird! We nursed him through pssitocosis (spelling) when he was a baby. He absolutely was the most demanding thing ever. Smart too!!!! He has a very happy life with a total bird freak who has cockatoos, african greys, etc. She works for a tropical bird vet in San Diego. It was one of the hardest things I ever did, letting him go. I did it on a provisional basis to make sure he would be happy with her and it worked out fine. But as Kenny said, he was so bonded and so demanding! I would never have another bird like that in a cage. Although he spent most of his time out of the cage! Parakeets, cockatiels and lovebirds are fine in homes and cages, but not the big guys! Took almost five years before I could talk about him without crying. frown


You will be 10 years older, ten years from now, no matter what you do - so go for it!

Estonia #6141 in Satin Mahogany
#764348 04/06/05 08:32 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
Quote
Originally posted by jodi:
Man, Nunatax, those birds look EXACTLY like the first two parakeets I had. Their names were "Blue Guy" and Green Guy"
Lest you worry about your naming capabilities, our two that also looked EXACTLY like Nunatax's were named Bluie and Greenie. laugh laugh laugh

When Bluie died, we replaced him with another named, you guessed it, Twoie! laugh

Our current is a solo male named Hedwig. He is by far the best pet bird we've ever had, with a HUGE vocabulary, very tame. I'm convinced it's because he has a decent name.

#764349 04/06/05 09:11 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
Quote
Originally posted by teachum:
It was one of the hardest things I ever did, letting him go. ... Took almost five years before I could talk about him without crying. frown
I hear that. I get extremely attached to animals. Even giving up my beautiful saltwater fish a few months ago tore my heart out. The final feeding was torture. I would even feel for my corals (animals) when they suffered.

As for the warm fuzzy variety of pets, I cant begin to describe my attachment. The loss can be devastating, regardless of circumstance.


I was born the year Glenn Gould stop playing concerts. Coincidence?
#764350 04/06/05 09:34 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 521
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 521
We have a sulpher crested cockatoo. We got Monty back in 1996 or 97. He is bonded with my dad, but likes the rest of the family. He talks and learns new things to say quite often. My dad lets him out of his cage and he'll sit on the door or climb on top.

Monty


Hilary aka LadyElton

********************

Check out my blog

"Looking like a true survivor..."
-- Sir EJ/BT '83
#764351 04/07/05 07:39 PM
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
T
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
Cockatoos are really sweet. I don't think they are quite as aggressively possessive as Amazons. You never wanted to say anything around Willie that you didn't want repeated. We taught him very little on purpose, he just learned everything. If he heard it and liked it, *plop*, right into his vocab. You had to watch what you said around him. He used to throw half-eaten food out of his cage for dog and then laugh if the dog choked on the seeds that were stuck on it. He would whistle for the dog too and call him over to his cage and then tease him.

Siddartha - my sister used to keep a saltwater aquarium. They are very cool. Much more interesting than freshwater fish. Although I used to get pretty attached to some of my freshwater fish years ago too. They have personalities!

I have five dogs, two cats and two horses. Lots of warm and fuzzies around here!


You will be 10 years older, ten years from now, no matter what you do - so go for it!

Estonia #6141 in Satin Mahogany
#764352 04/07/05 08:11 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
Quote
Originally posted by teachum:

I have five dogs, two cats and two horses. Lots of warm and fuzzies around here!
Sounds like heaven to me. In highschool, I was positioning to go into veterinary medicine. (Now in retrospect, it wouldnt have suited me) But then this music thing pulled me away.

Anyway, as a kid, I totally would fantasize about having a menagerie such as yours, and more. I had an aunt with 5 horses, 19 cats, 2 goats, many ducks, chickens, and one dog. When we would visit, the whole group would be in the living room playing charades, and I'd be out in the barn by myself for hours making friends. still hope for the menagerie someday, but as of now, I'm still limited to single guy apartment suitable communities.

There's so many species I'd love to share time with.


I was born the year Glenn Gould stop playing concerts. Coincidence?
#764353 04/07/05 08:28 PM
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
T
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 2,918
You are young, Siddartha, you have lots of time. But it's hard to do without pets when you love them. One thing I learned the hard way - it's best to wait until you can really take care of the critters before taking them on. I had some heart breaks back in my single days and I've seen others have them too by trying to take on animals when they weren't always in a position to control the circumstances. We have 10 l/2 acres and a huge fenced yard so we can handle it. But it's still a lot of managing. But we love them all.

Off to bed!


You will be 10 years older, ten years from now, no matter what you do - so go for it!

Estonia #6141 in Satin Mahogany
#764354 04/07/05 08:37 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
Quote
Originally posted by teachum:
One thing I learned the hard way - it's best to wait until you can really take care of the critters before taking them on.
Oh yes, I take the responsibility VERY seriously, and put the animals well being as priority one. I feel the owner has a moral obligation to provide ideal living conditions since the animal cant for himself, and has none of the power.

My cat is entering her geriatric phase (13 yrs old) and I've just begun subcutaneous fluids on her for some kidney issues. Thats quite an intense turn in my relationship with her, administering a surgical procedure, of sorts. But bottom line, whatever it takes, money or inconvenience, its my job.


I was born the year Glenn Gould stop playing concerts. Coincidence?
#764355 04/08/05 12:39 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 640
SAS Offline
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 640
Siddhartha,

I don't often post over here but just happened to see this thread and your post about your cat. I feel much like you to about pets. We used to have 3 cats and 2 dogs in my house, about 2 yrs ago I had to have my 16 year old cat put to sleep. It nearly killed me, I'd had that cat longer than I had my own mother with me. Like you, for the last year or year and a half I was giving him subcutaneous fluids because his kidneys were failing. We were doing well with that (I actually couldn't believe I could do something like that!), but then he developed cancer, so he had an operation. Turns out he was already in stage 4, so needless to say the growth came back, but we decided not to do anymore surgery and let him just live out his life. He did pretty well for awhile but one day just stopped eating. I tried for a few days, none of his usual treats would entice him, I guess he just decided it was time to go, so I had to take him to the vet and have him put to sleep. Still makes me cry to think about it.

I hope your cat does well, they can live a long time with the subcu fluids. Sorry to post a downer story though! It's amazing how our animals can affect us.

#764356 04/08/05 01:11 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,244
Quote
Originally posted by SAS:

I hope your cat does well, they can live a long time with the subcu fluids. Sorry to post a downer story though! It's amazing how our animals can affect us.
Thanks for the story. I'm surprised your cat had operations with kidney failure. Actually, I took her in due to a tumor on her tail. It had been there a long time (years) so I wasnt too concerned about it. The vet wanted to remove it. It was the pre-op blood work that turned up suspicious values with the kidneys. The operation will not be performed because weak kidneys render her too high a risk to survive the anesthesia. Although its just the creatinine value that is high in her blood work, from my readings we should be seeing other indicators of kidney failure too, so I'm a little confused. Maybe I should get a second opinion.

Anyway, this cat has been with me for 13 years, through many relocations, life changes, hard times. The most reliable and unconditional relationship of my life. I realize she plays way too large a role in my life for a cat and even sometimes feel bad that I've put that burden on her. But since that unfortunate day is now on the forseeable horizon, I feel I need to put her back into perspective as a cat to prepare. But performing these fluids treatments on her is just bonding us all the more. Its a very intimate act. I've only given her 4 applications so far. It was a little clumsy starting out, but I think we got it now, and we'll be fine with it.

When she leaves me, it will be the hardest day of my life, I fear. I'm supposed to be her protector, and here comes her big bad demise and there's nothing i can do about it. very difficult.

This makes me really feel for parents who lose young children to disease. Its so frustrating and feels helpless.

I just want to make sure I can make her as comfortable as possible when the time comes. I dont know if that would be putting her to sleep, or having her at home, in my lap naturally. I'm afraid if I take her in, I'll never keep my composure at the vets office. I already choke up a bit when I'm there (as I am right now). Well, either way it will be a very difficult and profound experience for me, but I already feel myself growing because of it. Not to get too heavy, but it is an inevitability for all of us, and this experience seems to be bringing me closer to healthy terms with that. If that makes any sense.

Peace.


I was born the year Glenn Gould stop playing concerts. Coincidence?
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
13th Piano Composition Competition Fidelio (Extended!!)
by harmonium53 - 05/26/22 01:20 PM
Is Music Right For You?
by FrankCox - 05/26/22 12:33 PM
Video on avoiding tension at the piano...
by thepianoplayer416 - 05/26/22 11:57 AM
What an ordeal!!!!
by ebonyk - 05/26/22 11:45 AM
How to include a photo
by FarmGirl - 05/26/22 11:30 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,247
Posts3,194,662
Members105,376
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5