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#472154 10/19/08 07:56 PM
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woodfab Offline OP
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My Russian piano has a lighter action as compare to other pianos I've played such as Steinway and other upper end pianos.

I practice every day, and then when I get a chance to play another such as a Steinway piano in front of people it's a real hindrance.

I'm wondering if I should get a heaver action or just say "That's Life"

Is a heaver action better or is it just old school?

I do enjoy the feel of my pianos action, but I haven't had a chance to play a heaver action for for more than 30 min at a time on rare occasions.


Dan (Piano Tinkerer)
#472155 10/19/08 08:15 PM
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The easiest way to deal with this dilemma is to play as many different pianos as possible at every opportunity. Hotels, churches, schools, piano stores, etcetera, all have pianos that you can practice on if you ask politely. No matter where I am, I'll always find one. You'll come across heavy, medium and light actions, and playing them all will better prepare you for any eventuality. Changing your piano's action response will be more difficult to do right and might not be worth the expense on your piano.


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#472156 10/19/08 08:43 PM
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woodfab:

In order to resolve the question you have to answer for yourself a couple of questions:
1) How does your piano's action compare to the norm (which is in the neighbourhood of 52 grams)?
2) How often are you going to be playing other pianos?
3) Will you be performing on other pianos or just playing on them?
4) If performing, do you get a chance to practice on a performance piano?
5) How quickly can you adjust to a different action?
6) How critical is the difference in your piano's action and that of others and how does that difference effect your playing?

Once you've answered these questions, I think you can answer the question in your post?

I'm not sure what you mean by "old school" when talking about the action of a piano.

Regards,


BruceD
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#472157 10/20/08 01:21 PM
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If anything, I would think a piano with slightly heavier action would be good to practice on so that when you perform it will be easier. However, there is a danger with this as well, because a piece can sure get away from you! The best option is simply practice on different pianos (preferably the one you will be performing on) to make whatever adjustments to your playing necessary.


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#472158 10/20/08 01:56 PM
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Of the steinway grands I´ve played at college (around 30 different models), I find the action to be pretty light actually compared to other brands and especially compared to many ordinary uprights.

So if your piano feels much lighter than a steinway, it may be a bit "too light". One thing though, if you´re considering buying a more heavy-action piano, be prepared that it may be hard to keep up the same length of practise every day, simply due to lack of strength and/or stamina. It´s like increasing the weights at the gym. But after a while one gets used to it.

#472159 10/20/08 02:58 PM
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To my way of thinking, this should not
be happening, that is, you, as an experienced
pianist, should be able to sit down at
any piano, or any keyboard instrument
for that matter, and play well. I believe
all keyboard instruments--grand, upright,
clavichord, organ, harpsichord, digital
piano, etc.--are of the same species
and are played the same way: you read the
notes and then hit them all right in the right
time at speed. You do that the same
on a harpsichord, a $100,000 concert grand
piano, or a 61-key portable electronic
keyboard.

There are differences in touch to be
sure, but even if you do all your
practicing at home on a 61-key,
unweighted portable keyboard, if you're
an experienced player who knows how
to play, you should still be able to sit
down on a grand piano with the heaviest
action and, maybe after a few seconds
to adjust, play your repertoire impressively.

If you're having trouble playing on other
pianos than your home piano, that's a bad
sign in my view. This means essentially
that you've become a one piano player:
you can only play well on your piano at
home, which is a strange sort of pianist
indeed. The reasons for this in my
view are that you're relying too much
on the feel of the keys on your piano
and its sound in order to play--then,
with the feel of the keys and sound
being different on another piano, you
won't be able to play. What's even
worse about this "play by feel and sound"
way of playing, in my view, is that in
this way you are essentially lowering
yourself to the level of an animal,
using only your physical senses like
an animal does, and not your brain, like
an intelligent human does. Thus,
when you sit at a another piano, you
start to feel it with your hands and
listen to it with your ears--like an
animal will go up to something and
sniff it, because he can only use his physical
sense of smell and not his brain to function
in the world--instead of using your
brain in an intelligent manner. But
now this new instrument feels different
and sounds different from your piano
at home, and so you can't play it like
that.

#472160 10/21/08 02:17 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by Gyro:

There are differences in touch to be
sure, but even if you do all your
practicing at home on a 61-key,
unweighted portable keyboard, if you're
an experienced player who knows how
to play, you should still be able to sit
down on a grand piano with the heaviest
action and, maybe after a few seconds
to adjust, play your repertoire impressively.
lol.. Gyro always lightens up my day.

#472161 10/21/08 06:33 AM
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The trouble with pianos is that you need to be a certain level before you get paid enough on concerts to bring your own piano. Until you get there, you should get as much experience on different pianos as you can.

How about your lessons, do you get them at home or on a different piano?

A cheaper way than getting a new piano would be to buy a digital piano with heavy action.

I think it is important to play much on heavier action at some level because there are a lot of techniques that can be learned better there.

#472162 10/21/08 07:53 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by Guendola:
I think it is important to play much on heavier action at some level because there are a lot of techniques that can be learned better there.
I'm curious about what specific techniques are better learned on a piano with a heavy action.

Steven

#472163 10/21/08 06:44 PM
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Posts: 430
woodfab Offline OP
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Thanks for the INPUT

I wouldn't call myself a pianist but I do love to play.

My touch weight is between 50 to 55 grams.

Well last five pianos I've tried were new in the $60,000 range.

I'm guessing that it's a combination of not being use to a new action, stage fright and lack of confidence when playing in front of real pianists.


Dan (Piano Tinkerer)
#472164 10/21/08 07:08 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by Gyro:
To my way of thinking, this should not
be happening, that is, you, as an experienced
pianist, should be able to sit down at
any piano, or any keyboard instrument
for that matter, and play well. I believe
all keyboard instruments--grand, upright,
clavichord, organ, harpsichord, digital
piano, etc.--are of the same species
and are played the same way: you read the
notes and then hit them all right in the right
time at speed. You do that the same
on a harpsichord, a $100,000 concert grand
piano, or a 61-key portable electronic
keyboard.

There are differences in touch to be
sure, but even if you do all your
practicing at home on a 61-key,
unweighted portable keyboard, if you're
an experienced player who knows how
to play, you should still be able to sit
down on a grand piano with the heaviest
action and, maybe after a few seconds
to adjust, play your repertoire impressively.

If you're having trouble playing on other
pianos than your home piano, that's a bad
sign in my view. This means essentially
that you've become a one piano player:
you can only play well on your piano at
home, which is a strange sort of pianist
indeed. The reasons for this in my
view are that you're relying too much
on the feel of the keys on your piano
and its sound in order to play--then,
with the feel of the keys and sound
being different on another piano, you
won't be able to play. What's even
worse about this "play by feel and sound"
way of playing, in my view, is that in
this way you are essentially lowering
yourself to the level of an animal,
using only your physical senses like
an animal does, and not your brain, like
an intelligent human does. Thus,
when you sit at a another piano, you
start to feel it with your hands and
listen to it with your ears--like an
animal will go up to something and
sniff it, because he can only use his physical
sense of smell and not his brain to function
in the world--instead of using your
brain in an intelligent manner. But
now this new instrument feels different
and sounds different from your piano
at home, and so you can't play it like
that.
Gyro- If you wouldn't put so many words on each line your posts would be much easier to read and even more convincing.

#472165 10/21/08 07:11 PM
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laugh

Gyro eschews word wrap...
He does not fill each line
like anyone else would do. :rolleyes:


Close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear weapons.
#472166 10/21/08 11:17 PM
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If I'm not mistaken, lighter action is actually old school.


One111

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