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Joined: Sep 2005
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LuigiV Offline OP
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Hi everyone,
I fell in love with this wonderful (IMHO) music so I am learning it.
Technically I can play it but what is the real difficult level on performing this one, and what is the optimal execution speed.
Many thanks.
Luigi

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Yes I have starting to play this one also but have to put it off for now. It's rather fast, isn't?

My daughter is doing better on this one than me.

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Speed is in the mind of the behol.....eh, player. Listen to Van Cliburn how he drags his feet, and then to Ingrid Häbler how she races on. Mozart himself complained that so many pianists played his music too fast. I was myself playing the rondo one day, and my neighbor, a marvellous pianist from Salzburg, knocked on the door and said: "Remember now, dis is not a Durkish polka, dis is a Durkish march! Don't play it so schnell!" So play it with elan and clarity, but not too fast. It's a rather easy peace, but watch your fingering, everything stands and falls with that. Viel Spass.


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Quote
Originally posted by LuigiV:
what is the optimal execution speed.
I think that's really up to you to decide. Listen to the piece in your mind. How do you hear it?

When you are just thinking about the music, how fast is it? How loud and soft is it? What kind of feel does it have?

Listen to how it sounds in your head, and then try and make it sound the same way when you play it on the piano.


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I really don't like it that fast, take it at a slower tempo

like horowitz, my favourite recording

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I heard in a master class once where the teacher said that the rolled chords in the coda where handled differently on Mozart's piano. According to her, Mozart had a piano with a lever by the knee, and when pushed with the knee, it would execute a mechnical snare drum roll. And thats what he would do on those rolled chords in the coda.

...???

I never heard of that or anything like it anywhere else in the course of study for a piano performance degree. Not thru the piano side, nor the music history side. Odd, that. I'm not saying its true or untrue, just passing along the anecdote. Maybe someone else can chime in on its authenticity.


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After two years of work, this piece is still the bane of my existence.

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I like to play this at a brisk march tempo but not too fast.


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i played this in a competition when I was 10 or 12.. I won in my class.. but totally blew the ending (final chord) for the recital performance - burst into tears and had to be led off stage.


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love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)
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Quote
Originally posted by Siddhartha:
According to her, Mozart had a piano with a lever by the knee, and when pushed with the knee, it would execute a mechnical snare drum roll. And thats what he would do on those rolled chords in the coda.

...???
Pianos in Mozart time had knee lever sustain - that lever pushing up the dampers. The pedal sustain was introduced by Broadwood (in 1783 ?).


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LuigiV Offline OP
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Thank you very much for your kindly replies.
I think this piece will 'follow' me thru all my life, there is a sort of chemistry in Mozart music (IMHO) and playing this rondò will be a great pleasure but also a huge challenge.
Ciao and please sorry for my bad english.
Luigi

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Aspets that are as important in the music as the tempo in this piece are the colour and drama of it.

If you can have a listien to recent (perhaps period instrument) recording of, say, 'Die Entfuehrung aus dem Serail' and you will really hear what counted as the 'Turkish' style in the music of Mozart's day. It is a march, but a decidely playful and exotic one, with the loud sections accompanied by bells and jangling.

Actually I think Murray Perahia is a pianist who captures this nicely on his recording of the sonata on Sony. I also like Andras Schiff here, who is very elegant, but with just a hint of something more racy.

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Quote
Originally posted by Siddhartha:
I heard in a master class once where the teacher said that the rolled chords in the coda where handled differently on Mozart's piano. According to her, Mozart had a piano with a lever by the knee, and when pushed with the knee, it would execute a mechnical snare drum roll. And thats what he would do on those rolled chords in the coda.
OMG maybe i have such a nasty time with those chords

I actually wished that they were normal chords not rolled

I wish i could play them this way, a lot easier

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Quote
Originally posted by Siddhartha:
I heard in a master class once where the teacher said that the rolled chords in the coda where handled differently on Mozart's piano. According to her, Mozart had a piano with a lever by the knee, and when pushed with the knee, it would execute a mechnical snare drum roll. And thats what he would do on those rolled chords in the coda.

...???

I never heard of that or anything like it anywhere else in the course of study for a piano performance degree. Not thru the piano side, nor the music history side. Odd, that. I'm not saying its true or untrue, just passing along the anecdote. Maybe someone else can chime in on its authenticity.
It is very possible that his piano had a stop on it that did that. There were many additions to early pianos to make them stand out from the harpsichord of the day. There's an early grand piano at the Fredrick's museum in Ashburnham, MA that has a mute pedal, and other odd stops.

http://www.frederickcollection.org/Katho1805.html

This one is a bit later than Mozart's piano, but it gives some historical perspective.

John


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Beethoven Sonata Op. 10 No. 2 in F, Haydn Sonata Hoboken XVI:41, Bach French Suite No. 5 in G BWV 816

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The stops or knee lever that mozart had was to make the Turkish stop ...

I auditioned with this piece last year, and am brushing it up to play in rep/master class next week.

I think it is very commical actually... during the octave section i think of a pompas (sp?) royal marching along, almost like the King in the King and I. Every step he takes.... BAM turkish stop... ba ba BAM ba ba BAM ba ba be BA ba ba be BA ba .... ba ba BAM ba ba BAM ba be ba BAM ba be ba BAM.

I love this peice... when i mastered it I felt like I had really learned something. My teacher said it is one of Mozart's most physically demanding movements.

I play it pretty brisk, but not so fast that you lose clarity when you get to the third section.

Anyway... just my 2 pennies!


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Quote
Originally posted by neciebuggs:
The stops or knee lever that mozart had was to make the Turkish stop ...

I auditioned with this piece last year, and am Every step he takes.... BAM turkish stop... ba ba BAM ba ba BAM ba ba be BA ba ba be BA ba .... ba ba BAM ba ba BAM ba be ba BAM ba be ba BAM.

What's a Turkish stop?


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The "Turkish stop" on early pianos:
Around the turn of the nineteenth century, "Turkish" music was so popular that piano manufacturers made special pianos with a "Turkish stop," also called the "military" or "Janissary" stop. The player would press a pedal that caused a bell to ring and/or a padded hammer to strike the soundboard in imitation of a bass drum. The sound file for the first musical example above attempts to mimic the latter effect manually with a modern piano.


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For more information on the Turkish stop, the K331 Rondo, and the whole Turkish fad in old Vienna go to:

"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_music_(style)"

(The forum software won't let me embed the link because it has parentheses, you need to cut and paste the link into your browser...)

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Please play it at at least Allegretto! The Turkish fanfares don't sound right any slower...


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