2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
81 members (apianostudent, brdwyguy, Anglagard44, betweensilence, Andrew E., Boboulus, 19 invisible), 633 guests, and 336 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
How much time do you typically spend taking a lead sheet from never seeing/playing it to a piano solo and having it polished? I’m referring to knowing what styles you’ll apply, such as open arpeggios LH, melody styles, voicings etc. basically ready to play it in front of people.

I know this can vary a lot I’m curious to hear some thoughts from you all. I also know you might play it differently today versus in the future just looking for some high level time spent. Also if you share your feedback can you also let me know how long you’ve been studying piano? For example, if you say you take a new lead sheet and have it ready in 4 hours I’m curious if you’ve been studying piano 19 years.

I’m still new to contemporary studies and I love it! But making my own arrangements with a lead sheet and learning it sure takes long. But its so exciting and feels like a huge accomplishment! I know as my skill advances this time will be less and less as I’ll be more familiar with chords, keys, voicings, patterns, etc.

Please provide and thoughts about this, your journey, feedback, etc.

Thank you all in advance!

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
Hi Sebs

Historically I mostly used lead sheets in a Jazz trio setting (Piano, Bass, Drums or Vibes) but since I rarely play in that format these days I don't use lead sheets very much. About 30 years ago I did play solo Piano in a Restaurant for a while, and also did a few other gigs playing solo Piano. I used the same lead sheets as for the trio gigs. I don't recall how much I practised for those.... I suspect not a lot!

If I know the tune/song and it's not enormously complicated I can normally just play it without any preparation. The only time that's different is if
a: I don't know the tune/song
and
b: if there are a lot of complex chords that I can't read at sight.

I've been playing Piano for about 50 years (I turned 60 this year). I practised a lot when I was an older teenager and in my 20s, and off and on over the years since then. The last period when I was practising a lot was in 2017.

For the band I'm in now I use chord charts, as we play rock/pop/blues songs where I don't need to play the melody. I've also spent the last few years playing Sax (which I've given up on) and drums a lot these days (which I love).

We've actually got our first post covid gig in 10 days time, and I'm playing both keyboards and drums. Not at the same time!

Cheers

Simon


Simon

Vox Continental 73
Casio PX-S3000
Pearl Midtown Drums
Thomann Vibraphone








Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
Thanks @Simon for the feedback! I can’t wait until I can play a song decent with less preparation but I know that is way way down the road and that’s ok. As I’m still learning basics but I know I’ve come along way already. Good luck on the upcoming gig! What style does your band play?

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 607
I
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 607
Interesting question. I'd say it depends on the song/tune as to how long. One key thing, is to try to further develop your understanding and perception of patterns in those songs...Developing a sort of vocabulary of things like chord voicing and root movement.

A while back, I learned "I've Got Rhythm"...Playing around with it, I noticed/discovered that the harmonic structure is basically the same (or hugely similar at the least) as The Flintstones Theme.

Noticing things like key changes in certain "standards" from the Great American Songbook - key changes (for example) specifically to the MEDIANT - the third scale degree of the original key the song is in...."Old Man River" , "Cry Me A River" , and "Am I Blue" as examples - ALL 3 songs modulate/change to the mediant at the bridge/release. Noticing things like this , lightens your mental musical load in a sense. Rather than memorizing chords, you can perceive patterns.

I didn't really answer your question specifically. But suggested ways to make the process quicker...over time if you can further develop your harmonic movement insights.

Last edited by indigo_dave; 11/03/21 10:58 AM.
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
Hi Sebs

The key (ha ha) thing for me was to understand chord structures, and then to be able to translate them virtually instantly into my left or right hands from the lead sheet. I spent a long long time learning how chords were constructed when I was younger.

I never think about the form in the sense that Dave mentioned (good idea though), although when playing Jazz I'd always be aware of the overall form of a song; i.e. AABA etc.

As I said rock/pop/blues. Examples from our set are:
Don't Let Me Down
Carole
The River
Doctor in my Eyes
Candy
Black Magic Woman

Cheers


Simon

Vox Continental 73
Casio PX-S3000
Pearl Midtown Drums
Thomann Vibraphone








Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
N
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
N
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
Originally Posted by Sebs
For example, if you say you take a new lead sheet and have it ready in 4 hours I’m curious if you’ve been studying piano 19 years.
I read Bill Evans talk about his approach to time allocation in work on the tune : on average 10 hours - and end. To be honest, I don't know how many years he studied.

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,191
J
jjo Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,191
Sebs: To answer your question, if I know a tune (meaning I've heard it) I can essentially sight read a solo piano version of it. I'd play it "for people" if that means I'm providing background music at some event rather than a concert where people are actually listening to me. It won't be a brilliant arrangement, but it will do the job and I'll enjoy playing it.

However, for most gigs, I'd have worked out a set list in advance, and I'd run through the tunes multiple times before playing it for people. So, maybe 1/2 hour per tune?

However, sometimes I want to actually work out an arrangement where I find an intro, voicings, chord substitutions, etc. That kind of effort can take several hours over the course of many days as I slowly come to an arrangement.

As for how long I've been playing, I studied classical through college, and have been studying jazz for about 15 years.

Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
Interesting question. I'd say it depends on the song/tune as to how long. One key thing, is to try to further develop your understanding and perception of patterns in those songs...Developing a sort of vocabulary of things like chord voicing and root movement.

A while back, I learned "I've Got Rhythm"...Playing around with it, I noticed/discovered that the harmonic structure is basically the same (or hugely similar at the least) as The Flintstones Theme.

Noticing things like key changes in certain "standards" from the Great American Songbook - key changes (for example) specifically to the MEDIANT - the third scale degree of the original key the song is in...."Old Man River" , "Cry Me A River" , and "Am I Blue" as examples - ALL 3 songs modulate/change to the mediant at the bridge/release. Noticing things like this , lightens your mental musical load in a sense. Rather than memorizing chords, you can perceive patterns.

I didn't really answer your question specifically. But suggested ways to make the process quicker...over time if you can further develop your harmonic movement insights.
All good that it wasn't completely specific to what I asked but this was still helpful and I'm looking for any feedback related, thanks for providing input. I'm definitely working on developing those insights and sure is no small task but every little bit I learn each day adds up. While I want to focus on pop and thought Id never be interested in Jazz I actually started studying some jazz lately as I know that will help a ton.


Originally Posted by Simon_b
Hi Sebs

The key (ha ha) thing for me was to understand chord structures, and then to be able to translate them virtually instantly into my left or right hands from the lead sheet. I spent a long long time learning how chords were constructed when I was younger.

I never think about the form in the sense that Dave mentioned (good idea though), although when playing Jazz I'd always be aware of the overall form of a song; i.e. AABA etc.
Good to know and I'm studying the structures, how to build them, etc. there's so much to learn but I'm making a lot of progress. It's definitely much different than just playing a song already arranged by someone else, I'm not downplaying that but sure is challenging essentially making your own arrangment but so rewarding.


Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by Sebs
For example, if you say you take a new lead sheet and have it ready in 4 hours I’m curious if you’ve been studying piano 19 years.
I read Bill Evans talk about his approach to time allocation in work on the tune : on average 10 hours - and end. To be honest, I don't know how many years he studied.
I would love to be able to have tune ready to perform in 10 hours. Although I maybe could if it was a simple tune and I apply very simple style to it. Such as single note LH and RH. Maybe I need to do more of that, some quick wins, as I'm sure it still is good practice.


Originally Posted by jjo
Sebs: To answer your question, if I know a tune (meaning I've heard it) I can essentially sight read a solo piano version of it. I'd play it "for people" if that means I'm providing background music at some event rather than a concert where people are actually listening to me. It won't be a brilliant arrangement, but it will do the job and I'll enjoy playing it.

However, for most gigs, I'd have worked out a set list in advance, and I'd run through the tunes multiple times before playing it for people. So, maybe 1/2 hour per tune?

However, sometimes I want to actually work out an arrangement where I find an intro, voicings, chord substitutions, etc. That kind of effort can take several hours over the course of many days as I slowly come to an arrangement.

As for how long I've been playing, I studied classical through college, and have been studying jazz for about 15 years.
That's awesome. Hoping once I get 15 years down I could crank out a tune from a lead sheet in a few hours or few days even would be fantastic. 1/2 hour per tune that's great, I can't help but say, that must be awesome to be able to do that! Don't get me wrong I'm loving my journey and have come a long way but I can't wait to be able to play more and more tunes and spend less time 'learning' them but be able to get them down quickly.

Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 852
Hi Sebs

Don't worry about how long it's taking you. If you're just playing for the enjoyment and don't have any sort of audience you can make the arrangements as simple or as complicated as you wish.

Perhaps on some occasions pick a simple pop tune you know well and play a simple arrangement from the lead sheet. For example just play an alternating R 5 R or R 3 5 in your LH and play the melody in your RH. You'll certainly get to the point where you can do this sort of thing very quickly, with no preparation; maybe you already can?

At the other extreme is Nahum's example. When he talks about the time Bill Evans spent, that is a very sophisticated complete re-harmonisation of the tune. Bill Evans was a one-off, very few people can do what he did, or play like him.

But you could do something at a lower level like taking a well known Jazz standard (Autumn Leaves etc) and spend time picking out some (simpler) Jazz harmonies and voicings that work.

And don't feel the need to do all the work yourself. Beg, borrow and steal from better musicians and add what they do into your vocabulary.

Cheers


Simon

Vox Continental 73
Casio PX-S3000
Pearl Midtown Drums
Thomann Vibraphone








Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 314
J
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
J
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 314
I play mostly for myself. I am not classically trained nor am I a professional. I am just a man who plays music as a hobby and self enjoyment.

I learned from a professional who played beautiful piano in restaurants, hotels, cocktail lounges, etc. He taught me to play all inversions of all chords up to and including all 7ths and some 9ths. I was taught to play the single note melody in the right hand first and then little by little as much of the chord as sounded good under the melody. In the left hand I played mostly 8th note patterns on notes R-3-5. It does not take long to come up with an arrangement. To add the fancy sounding fills and runs is the one that takes me a lot of time. Sometimes I think I am tone deaf.

You would be surprised at the number of songs one can play that sound good with only one note in the right hand and one note in the left hand. Try them and if the song sounds empty, add a note or two.

Good Luck and play for your own enjoyment. That is the best way to go IMO.

Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
N
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
N
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
Originally Posted by Simon_b
At the other extreme is Nahum's example. When he talks about the time Bill Evans spent, that is a very sophisticated complete re-harmonisation of the tune. Bill Evans was a one-off, very few people can do what he did, or play like him.

I have never measured before needful time to create a piano arrangement of a tune; this time I decided to check. 3th page of A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square (3 pages in total).

[Linked Image] Due to a weak memory, I have to write everything down on notes, however I work very slowly with a sheet music editor; from here all the work took me nine and a half hours where the lion's share of the time is working on the computer. .

Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,647
Gold Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,647
Here is an example of a cocktail pianist playing a song from a lead sheet the first time. On the fly so to speak.

Sangah Noona;.

After she goes through the tune once, she starts to build on it.


Kawai NV10
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
Originally Posted by Simon_b
Hi Sebs

Don't worry about how long it's taking you. If you're just playing for the enjoyment and don't have any sort of audience you can make the arrangements as simple or as complicated as you wish.

Perhaps on some occasions pick a simple pop tune you know well and play a simple arrangement from the lead sheet. For example just play an alternating R 5 R or R 3 5 in your LH and play the melody in your RH. You'll certainly get to the point where you can do this sort of thing very quickly, with no preparation; maybe you already can?
I wouldn't say Im there yet but close. For example, I was working on a simple tune and I was able to play half note root LH (at chord change) then single note RH melody as written on sheet and within a few hours (total of about 4 hours across a week or two). I know it's not fancy but it still was exciting and I could not have not have done that a year ago. I try not to really worry about how long it takes but it would be nice to just be able to get there quicker that way I could play more tunes for friends and my enjoyment. Such as when I go to a house and theres a piano Id love to be able to pull a sheet and play something.
Originally Posted by Simon_b
At the other extreme is Nahum's example. When he talks about the time Bill Evans spent, that is a very sophisticated complete re-harmonisation of the tune. Bill Evans was a one-off, very few people can do what he did, or play like him.

But you could do something at a lower level like taking a well known Jazz standard (Autumn Leaves etc) and spend time picking out some (simpler) Jazz harmonies and voicings that work.

And don't feel the need to do all the work yourself. Beg, borrow and steal from better musicians and add what they do into your vocabulary.

Cheers
I agree and I trust me I don't think I could ever do what Bill did. For me I'd love to just be able to have tune under my fingers in 10 hours nothing too complex but little more than single note.




Originally Posted by john fh
I play mostly for myself. I am not classically trained nor am I a professional. I am just a man who plays music as a hobby and self enjoyment.

I learned from a professional who played beautiful piano in restaurants, hotels, cocktail lounges, etc. He taught me to play all inversions of all chords up to and including all 7ths and some 9ths. I was taught to play the single note melody in the right hand first and then little by little as much of the chord as sounded good under the melody. In the left hand I played mostly 8th note patterns on notes R-3-5. It does not take long to come up with an arrangement. To add the fancy sounding fills and runs is the one that takes me a lot of time. Sometimes I think I am tone deaf.

You would be surprised at the number of songs one can play that sound good with only one note in the right hand and one note in the left hand. Try them and if the song sounds empty, add a note or two.

Good Luck and play for your own enjoyment. That is the best way to go IMO.
I know what you mean and sometimes I think people over do songs with way too many runs, fills, etc. I recently did play Unchained melody with open arpeggios LH and single note RH and I thought it sounded good. I was then able to play RH octaves which was really fun too. I know I'm on the right track and eventually I'll be able to add a little more complexity with same time as my skill advances.




Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by Simon_b
At the other extreme is Nahum's example. When he talks about the time Bill Evans spent, that is a very sophisticated complete re-harmonisation of the tune. Bill Evans was a one-off, very few people can do what he did, or play like him.

I have never measured before needful time to create a piano arrangement of a tune; this time I decided to check. 3th page of A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square (3 pages in total).

Due to a weak memory, I have to write everything down on notes, however I work very slowly with a sheet music editor; from here all the work took me nine and a half hours where the lion's share of the time is working on the computer.

Im not expert but that seems very quick and for what looks like a complex sheet.

Joined: May 2012
Posts: 607
I
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 607
I read the original post , mostly anyway. When I work up a song, it's not like I'm building a sand castle on the beach.....It's more like a playground....jamming or improvising on the song is comparable to playing in the sandbox on the playground. Pulling out my Beatles fake book and playing thru some songs and singing might be playing on the swing set. Playing on the monkey bars might be like slowly and laboriously sight reading thru Bach.

So a song gets played with and left alone....then played with over again. I've been playing with trying to come up with a head arrangement of "A Foggy Day"....something that I actually like...with a sort of choppy bounce between the left and right hands. I play with it. I've also been playing with trying to do a version of "Yesterday" (Beatles) with a bit of a backbeat, but not too overdone.

I don't sit and labor over them, I play with them. They call it "playing".

Last edited by indigo_dave; 11/05/21 06:48 PM.
Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 36
C
CWT Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 36
I have used lead sheets mainly at church and I usually learn new music from lead sheets in less than an hour. I usually do not publish these or play solo. I prefer the written score. I add arpeggios where I think they will fit. I have heard music that I did not like and refused to play it. I have played a lot of stride in the left hand. Most of what I play in church is songs I have heard sung many times and I can usually go to the piano and play them without practice. I do practice different arrangements of old songs; arpeggios in different places, adding a little "Floyd Cramer" style, and scales. Also I use a lot of chord inversions.

Last edited by CWT; 11/05/21 09:37 PM.
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I read the original post , mostly anyway. When I work up a song, it's not like I'm building a sand castle on the beach.....It's more like a playground....jamming or improvising on the song is comparable to playing in the sandbox on the playground. Pulling out my Beatles fake book and playing thru some songs and singing might be playing on the swing set. Playing on the monkey bars might be like slowly and laboriously sight reading thru Bach.

So a song gets played with and left alone....then played with over again. I've been playing with trying to come up with a head arrangement of "A Foggy Day"....something that I actually like...with a sort of choppy bounce between the left and right hands. I play with it. I've also been playing with trying to do a version of "Yesterday" (Beatles) with a bit of a backbeat, but not too overdone.

I don't sit and labor over them, I play with them. They call it "playing".

I know what you mean and I’m working on getting to that point where I can play in the playground but since I’m still beginner I still build a lot of sand castles haha. Although maybe I should play around more and do very simple things like just simple triad LH and sing etc I’m sure I could find more things that are like that versus always building. Also I’m actually working on Yesteday too from an old fake book. I’m building it up right now I’m learning just half nite LH at chord change always on beat 1 and 3 (I did some very basic reharmonizing by moving some around) then just doing single note RH and eventually I want to play open arpeggios LH and some interval melody. I’d love to hear about how you will play your version if you don’t sharing some details on it. It’s been fun so far and I love the song and melody.


Originally Posted by CWT
I have used lead sheets mainly at church and I usually learn new music from lead sheets in less than an hour. I usually do not publish these or play solo. I prefer the written score. I add arpeggios where I think they will fit. I have heard music that I did not like and refused to play it. I have played a lot of stride in the left hand. Most of what I play in church is songs I have heard sung many times and I can usually go to the piano and play them without practice. I do practice different arrangements of old songs; arpeggios in different places, adding a little "Floyd Cramer" style, and scales. Also I use a lot of chord inversions.

What a difference does really know a song make. I noticed if I try a song I don’t know well it seems harder to play or get the nice sound of it. But once you play one you know really well it almost comes little easier.

Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 314
J
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
J
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 314
Sebs, learn the single note melody and the words. If you cannot sing do as I do because I can't sing either. Sing to your self and let it all hang out so to speak. Really get into it and when you play you will sound good. Have you ever listened to a singer and counted the timing they gave to the song. Sure they keep with the timing overall but their expression shortens some notes or phrases and lengthens others. They sign with feeling and your playing melody in the right hand should so the same.

Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
N
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
N
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 4,708
Originally Posted by john fh
Have you ever listened to a singer and counted the timing they gave to the song. Sure they keep with the timing overall but their expression shortens some notes or phrases and lengthens others.
Known situation: a vocalist can learn a song with lyrics in an hour and a half; and then it takes weeks and months of work to interpret the performance. For a pianist, this is more difficult: in addition to interpreting the melody, interpretations of harmony and arrangement are required.

Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
S
Sebs Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,045
Originally Posted by john fh
Sebs, learn the single note melody and the words. If you cannot sing do as I do because I can't sing either. Sing to your self and let it all hang out so to speak. Really get into it and when you play you will sound good. Have you ever listened to a singer and counted the timing they gave to the song. Sure they keep with the timing overall but their expression shortens some notes or phrases and lengthens others. They sign with feeling and your playing melody in the right hand should so the same.

Got it. I also think really knowing the words helps to keep it flowing and then you can rely on the score much less.


Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by john fh
Have you ever listened to a singer and counted the timing they gave to the song. Sure they keep with the timing overall but their expression shortens some notes or phrases and lengthens others.
Known situation: a vocalist can learn a song with lyrics in an hour and a half; and then it takes weeks and months of work to interpret the performance. For a pianist, this is more difficult: in addition to interpreting the melody, interpretations of harmony and arrangement are required.

Reading this makes me think that even playing simple piano solos (As I do) is no small task. I notice that to add expression and really make the piano sing you need to be very comfortable with it and have it under your fingers really well.


Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai ES520 Teardown
by KawaFanboi - 05/20/22 01:00 PM
My Kawai RX3 finally started to sounds like Kawai
by Joonsung - 05/20/22 12:52 PM
I need some advice
by Lúthien - 05/20/22 12:23 PM
Harmonization by pentatonic chords
by Nahum - 05/20/22 06:25 AM
Studio Grand from XLN audio for 62€
by klausi6 - 05/20/22 06:23 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,159
Posts3,193,240
Members105,328
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5