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#3130016 06/21/21 01:18 PM
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Hi,

I am looking for an ABRSM Piano teacher in the US.

I tried the ABRSM site and could not find a directory.

I was hoping to find a teacher in my area (New Hampshire) or online but prefer face to face if possible.

Can someone suggest where to look?

Thank you.

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Originally Posted by Snowstorm
Hi,

I am looking for an ABRSM Piano teacher in the US.

I tried the ABRSM site and could not find a directory.

I was hoping to find a teacher in my area (New Hampshire) or online but prefer face to face if possible.

Can someone suggest where to look?
Did you consider contacting each piano teacher in your area (which you should be able to find from a directory of piano teachers, like https://pianoteachersdirectory.com/location/united-states/new-hampshire/ ), and asking them directly by email or phone whether they do ABRSM?

If they haven't heard of ABRSM (which most wouldn't), you can stop enquiring any further.

Weren't you doing RCM before, and if so, is there a particular reason you want to switch to ABRSM (which is little known in North America)?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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You can also search by location through mtna.org (National music teacher’s association)


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I suggest any competent teacher could prepare you for the ABRSM exams. They will have covered all aspects of the musical content one way or another if they have been properly trained.

Teachers in your area may not be familiar with the name but if you download the requirements to show them it will be clear that the path is a standard one. There’s lots of practice material available too from the organisation.

You would just have to agree the appropriate level with your teacher.

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Originally Posted by terentius
I suggest any competent teacher could prepare you for the ABRSM exams. They will have covered all aspects of the musical content one way or another if they have been properly trained.
I very much doubt it, based on the posts I've seen from other teachers here over the years.

Hardly any teacher spends any time on aural training, if they don't follow any syllabus (RCM, ABRSM, AMEB)........and some don't even teach scales & arpeggios. It's all about teaching pieces - often 'songs' that the student likes.

And this applies especially to teaching adult students.

That doesn't mean they can't teach following the requirements of ABRSM, of course, but if the student isn't actually doing the exams, he might not know how well he has been taught.

The student recitals organised by most teachers in the US just show the students' ability to play pieces. And some have even been taught those pieces by rote.


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You could try contacting a local university, and seeing if someone is up to the task. Also, if you're lucky, you might find a college student who happens to be a good teacher.

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Quote
Hardly any teacher spends any time on aural training, if they don't follow any syllabus (RCM, ABRSM, AMEB)........and some don't even teach scales & arpeggios. It's all about teaching pieces - often 'songs' that the student likes.

And this applies especially to teaching adult students.

How do you know 'hardly any teacher spends time on aural training'? You really should try teaching an adult learner before making sweeping remarks.

As for the emphasis on teaching pieces, I think when you look at the ABRSM syllabus and see that the pieces carry 90 marks and the aural just 18 - you begin to understand where one's priorities lie. It says more about the ABRSM system than it does a teacher.

Quote
That doesn't mean they can't teach following the requirements of ABRSM, of course, but if the student isn't actually doing the exams, he might not know how well he has been taught.

How a student does in an exam is not necessarily a reflection on how they've been taught. There are many factors than can influence how an exam is marked and how a students performs in an exam situation.


Quote
The student recitals organised by most teachers in the US just show the students' ability to play pieces. And some have even been taught those pieces by rote

Many students who sit ABRSM exams learn by rote too. In my experience, this approach is often used where the emphasis falls on 'passing grades', rather than a slower, more holistic approach to music learning. This pressure often comes from other factors such as: parents, peers or high-expectations.

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Originally Posted by fatar760
Quote
Hardly any teacher spends any time on aural training, if they don't follow any syllabus (RCM, ABRSM, AMEB)........and some don't even teach scales & arpeggios. It's all about teaching pieces - often 'songs' that the student likes.

And this applies especially to teaching adult students.

How do you know 'hardly any teacher spends time on aural training'? You really should try teaching an adult learner before making sweeping remarks.
Instead of making snide remarks (not for the first time), try to read my posts carefully and take them on board.

I'm basing my comment on what I've been reading in posts here in Piano Teachers Forum and ABF over the past twelve years. Why don't you do the same before jumping down my throat, for once?

And I'm not talking about piano teaching in the UK, though some teachers here who specialise in adult beginners do much the same with their adult students: if students tell them what they want to learn, the teachers teach what they want to learn. Otherwise the students will go elsewhere.



Quote
As for the emphasis on teaching pieces, I think when you look at the ABRSM syllabus and see that the pieces carry 90 marks and the aural just 18 - you begin to understand where one's priorities lie. It says more about the ABRSM system than it does a teacher.
Of course there is a lot more marks for pieces than for aurals and sight-reading and scales & arpeggios. It is a piano exam.

But you're talking through your hat when you claim that a student who cannot read music at all and has no aural skills can pass any grade exam with flying colours.

Why do you teach ABRSM at all, if you're so critical of it? Is it because your students want to do the exams, and you acquiesce because you need their money? Are you actually teaching them properly - as per the ABRSM's ethos (- go to their website and read it)? If all you're doing is to teach them to pass the exams as quickly as possible, you're doing them - and yourself - no favours.

When I compare what I - and all my fellow students, when I was a student myself as a kid - learnt in terms of overall musical skills that enabled me to sight-sing (and thus join a choir that performed regularly and won national and international competitions), play in ensemble, conduct, compose, make arrangements etc - all just from learning piano and going through the grades like everyone else, I thank my lucky stars that I was taught (by my first three teachers in two different countries) following the syllabus. I have been a member of several ad-hoc choirs as an adult, and everyone in those choirs can sight-sing, yet none of them ever had singing lessons. The only thing they had in common was that they'd been through the grades on their instruments - piano, string, woodwind, brass. I used to take that for granted, until I discovered here in PW that actually, most teachers who don't use a syllabus (which is almost all teachers here) only teach pieces. Aural skills, theory, sight-reading, often even scales & arpeggios are not part of their teaching.

I strongly advise you to stop teaching ABRSM to any more of your students, as they will pick up on your vibes about its "shortcomings" as you deem them. (I deem them your shortcomings.) You can devise your own syllabus - far superior to ABRSM, I'm sure...... smirk


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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by fatar760
Quote
Hardly any teacher spends any time on aural training, if they don't follow any syllabus (RCM, ABRSM, AMEB)........and some don't even teach scales & arpeggios. It's all about teaching pieces - often 'songs' that the student likes.

And this applies especially to teaching adult students.

How do you know 'hardly any teacher spends time on aural training'? You really should try teaching an adult learner before making sweeping remarks.
Instead of making snide remarks (not for the first time), try to read my posts carefully and take them on board.

I'm basing my comment on what I've been reading in posts here in Piano Teachers Forum and ABF over the past twelve years. Why don't you do the same before jumping down my throat, for once?

And I'm not talking about piano teaching in the UK, though some teachers here who specialise in adult beginners do much the same with their adult students: if students tell them what they want to learn, the teachers teach what they want to learn. Otherwise the students will go elsewhere.



Quote
As for the emphasis on teaching pieces, I think when you look at the ABRSM syllabus and see that the pieces carry 90 marks and the aural just 18 - you begin to understand where one's priorities lie. It says more about the ABRSM system than it does a teacher.
Of course there is a lot more marks for pieces than for aurals and sight-reading and scales & arpeggios. It is a piano exam.

But you're talking through your hat when you claim that a student who cannot read music at all and has no aural skills can pass any grade exam with flying colours.

Why do you teach ABRSM at all, if you're so critical of it? Is it because your students want to do the exams, and you acquiesce because you need their money? Are you actually teaching them properly - as per the ABRSM's ethos (- go to their website and read it)? If all you're doing is to teach them to pass the exams as quickly as possible, you're doing them - and yourself - no favours.

When I compare what I - and all my fellow students, when I was a student myself as a kid - learnt in terms of overall musical skills that enabled me to sight-sing (and thus join a choir that performed regularly and won national and international competitions), play in ensemble, conduct, compose, make arrangements etc - all just from learning piano and going through the grades like everyone else, I thank my lucky stars that I was taught (by my first three teachers in two different countries) following the syllabus. I have been a member of several ad-hoc choirs as an adult, and everyone in those choirs can sight-sing, yet none of them ever had singing lessons. The only thing they had in common was that they'd been through the grades on their instruments - piano, string, woodwind, brass. I used to take that for granted, until I discovered here in PW that actually, most teachers who don't use a syllabus (which is almost all teachers here) only teach pieces. Aural skills, theory, sight-reading, often even scales & arpeggios are not part of their teaching.

I strongly advise you to stop teaching ABRSM to any more of your students, as they will pick up on your vibes about its "shortcomings" as you deem them. (I deem them your shortcomings.) You can devise your own syllabus - far superior to ABRSM, I'm sure...... smirk

Oh dear. More assumptions.

I did read your post carefully - I had to when I was quoting you. It seems like if someone disagrees with your comments then they 'haven't read your post correctly'. No, I'm just disagreeing with you - and not in a snide way, I was quite direct.

I no longer enter students into ABRSM exams - shame you assumed I did before posting diatribe.

As for claiming 'i'm talking through my hat' regarding a student who passed with three distinctions. You have no basis to dismiss that this happened. None at all.

She was a 11 year old student who had passed her Grade 1 - 3 piano exams with distinction. I saw the marking sheets for each exam. In her three years of learning (yeh she went straight into the exam syllabus), she'd learnt just 9 pieces. There were note names on each note. She didn't know the C Major Scale and couldn't sight-read at that level.

FYI - my students used to pass their Grade 1 theory before we looked at the practical exams, which was a long process but set a solid foundation.

You should perhaps be a little more inquisitive before passing judgement of others.

I'd like to remind you that in the PW Rules, it states:

"Discuss what has been said, not the person who said it. Feel free to disagree, even strongly, with something someone has said but note that they're as entitled to their opinion as you are and just because they don't share your opinion doesn't mean they're wrong or deserving of abuse."

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Originally Posted by fatar760
Oh dear. More assumptions.

I did read your post carefully - I had to when I was quoting you. It seems like if someone disagrees with your comments then they 'haven't read your post correctly'. No, I'm just disagreeing with you - and not in a snide way, I was quite direct.
So, you have actually read my post carefully, yet didn't get my message - that I was basing my comment on posts in PW? Did you read through past posts here from other teachers, and the experiences of students in ABF? If you have, you'd know I am saying things as they really are, not just giving my "opinion".

Dear, dear, dear..... smirk




Quote
She was a 11 year old student who had passed her Grade 1 - 3 piano exams with distinction. I saw the marking sheets for each exam. In her three years of learning (yeh she went straight into the exam syllabus), she'd learnt just 9 pieces. There were note names on each note. She didn't know the C Major Scale and couldn't sight-read at that level.
Yes, you keep repeating that to bash ABRSM. In fact, I remember you said that before, a few years ago.

But the strange thing is, you never say what marks that student got in sight-reading, scales & arpeggios and aurals, even though I asked you before, more than once. Did she pass them? If she did, how?




Quote
"Discuss what has been said, not the person who said it. Feel free to disagree, even strongly, with something someone has said but note that they're as entitled to their opinion as you are and just because they don't share your opinion doesn't mean they're wrong or deserving of abuse."
I respond to people exactly as they write, in my own direct way.

What was that you directed at me?
Quote
How do you know 'hardly any teacher spends time on aural training'? You really should try teaching an adult learner before making sweeping remarks.
If you want to keep attacking me personally, and what I write - which are based on fact -, perhaps do that in private, via PM? There's other stuff you've posted recently which, because they weren't directed at me, I didn't get involved in. Unlike you, with my posts here responding to someone else - and you jumped in with your first post directly attacking me.

There are a lot of things I'd like to say to you - directly -, but I refrain......


I'll look forward to your PMs, if you do want to continue pursuing this.


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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by fatar760
Oh dear. More assumptions.

I did read your post carefully - I had to when I was quoting you. It seems like if someone disagrees with your comments then they 'haven't read your post correctly'. No, I'm just disagreeing with you - and not in a snide way, I was quite direct.
So, you have actually read my post carefully, yet didn't get my message - that I was basing my comment on posts in PW? Did you read through past posts here from other teachers, and the experiences of students in ABF? If you have, you'd know I am saying things as they really are, not just giving my "opinion".

Dear, dear, dear..... smirk




Quote
She was a 11 year old student who had passed her Grade 1 - 3 piano exams with distinction. I saw the marking sheets for each exam. In her three years of learning (yeh she went straight into the exam syllabus), she'd learnt just 9 pieces. There were note names on each note. She didn't know the C Major Scale and couldn't sight-read at that level.
Yes, you keep repeating that to bash ABRSM. In fact, I remember you said that before, a few years ago.

But the strange thing is, you never say what marks that student got in sight-reading, scales & arpeggios and aurals, even though I asked you before, more than once. Did she pass them? If she did, how?




Quote
"Discuss what has been said, not the person who said it. Feel free to disagree, even strongly, with something someone has said but note that they're as entitled to their opinion as you are and just because they don't share your opinion doesn't mean they're wrong or deserving of abuse."
I respond to people exactly as they write, in my own direct way.

What was that you directed at me?
Quote
How do you know 'hardly any teacher spends time on aural training'? You really should try teaching an adult learner before making sweeping remarks.
If you want to keep attacking me personally, and what I write - which are based on fact -, perhaps do that in private, via PM? There's other stuff you've posted recently which, because they weren't directed at me, I didn't get involved in. Unlike you, with my posts here responding to someone else - and you jumped in with your first post directly attacking me.

There are a lot of things I'd like to say to you - directly -, but I refrain......

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You can mark me down as an exception: I did not sit for any exams as a kid, but I had two piano lessons per week: one for repertoire and the second for theory and ear training. To my knowledge, my teacher did not participate in the exam system.

I honestly don’t see how all of this could be taught well in one lesson per week— but I have never taught.


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I'm not attacking you personally at all. You stated you don't teach adult learners and I, and others, said you really should before making judgements.

You didn't ask me about my previous students markings. If you had I'd have answered. If you asked years ago, then no, I don't have the time to go trawling through posts - who does?

This student was around 08/09 and I cannot recall her individual markings from each of her three exams. I doubt many teachers could. To get over 130 marks I'd suggest her markings in these areas were high.

I have no desire to 'continue' anything with you via PM or otherwise, particularly as you seem to evade questions and leap down someone's throat when they disagree with you (and people WILL disagree with you), how you choose to respond is a choice, and your responses don't invite an open dialogue - in fact your penultimate was quite aggressive.

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Originally Posted by dogperson
You can mark me down as an exception: I did not sit for any exams as a kid, but I had two piano lessons per week: one for repertoire and the second for theory and ear training. To my knowledge, my teacher did not participate in the exam system.

I honestly don’t see how all of this could be taught well in one lesson per week— but I have never taught.

It depends on the length of the lesson and the age of the student, I think.

I used to find that students who were taught twice a week, for maybe 30-45 mins a time, progressed much quicker than those who had one 60 min lesson a week. I think mostly because it meant they had to sit at the piano more than once a week ha!

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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Snowstorm
Hi,

I am looking for an ABRSM Piano teacher in the US.

I tried the ABRSM site and could not find a directory.

I was hoping to find a teacher in my area (New Hampshire) or online but prefer face to face if possible.

Can someone suggest where to look?
Did you consider contacting each piano teacher in your area (which you should be able to find from a directory of piano teachers, like https://pianoteachersdirectory.com/location/united-states/new-hampshire/ ), and asking them directly by email or phone whether they do ABRSM?

If they haven't heard of ABRSM (which most wouldn't), you can stop enquiring any further.

Weren't you doing RCM before, and if so, is there a particular reason you want to switch to ABRSM (which is little known in North America)?

That is correct, I am doing the RCM program and I have decided to stay with the program and my teacher.

I like the program and I like my teacher.

I was wondering how it would be to do in person lessons, never done that before.

I was naive and thought maybe there would be more ABRSM teachers in my area but that is not the case.

Just like RCM, I would have to find an ABRSM teacher online, it would defeat the purpose and like I said I like my teacher and the program.

I appreciate everyone help.

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Originally Posted by Snowstorm
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Snowstorm
Hi,

I am looking for an ABRSM Piano teacher in the US.

I tried the ABRSM site and could not find a directory.

I was hoping to find a teacher in my area (New Hampshire) or online but prefer face to face if possible.

Can someone suggest where to look?
Did you consider contacting each piano teacher in your area (which you should be able to find from a directory of piano teachers, like https://pianoteachersdirectory.com/location/united-states/new-hampshire/ ), and asking them directly by email or phone whether they do ABRSM?

If they haven't heard of ABRSM (which most wouldn't), you can stop enquiring any further.

Weren't you doing RCM before, and if so, is there a particular reason you want to switch to ABRSM (which is little known in North America)?

That is correct, I am doing the RCM program and I have decided to stay with the program and my teacher.

I like the program and I like my teacher.

I was wondering how it would be to do in person lessons, never done that before.

I was naive and thought maybe there would be more ABRSM teachers in my area but that is not the case.

Just like RCM, I would have to find an ABRSM teacher online, it would defeat the purpose and like I said I like my teacher and the program.

I appreciate everyone help.

Have you tried the ABRSM Teacher's Forum? You may have some joy there:

https://forums.abrsm.org/index.php?showforum=2

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Actually, I did.

After three days, I am still waiting to get approve to post.

So far, there is less overall bs with RCM than ABRSM.

You can go on the RCM website with an actual directory with teachers contact/info and contact them from there.

No login needed.

I'm going to stick with RCM for now, but thank you.

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Originally Posted by Snowstorm
Actually, I did.

After three days, I am still waiting to get approve to post.

So far, there is less overall bs with RCM than ABRSM.

You can go on the RCM website with an actual directory with teachers contact/info and contact them from there.

No login needed.

I'm going to stick with RCM for now, but thank you.

I wonder if there's some issue with ABRSM at the moment.

If you'd like me to post something there on your behalf just PM me - sounds like you're onto a good thing with RCM though smile

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I use the ABRSM forums regularly. I do seem to remember new members moaning sometimes that it took a few days to register to post.
However, I'm almost certain they don't have a register of teachers as such. If you're still interested you could contact your nearest rep in the US who might be able to help.
https://us.abrsm.org/en/exam-booking/local-exam-contacts/

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Yep, did that too.

I contacted the one from MA and I got a voicemail with a voicemail full.

That's when I decided to post here.

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