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How can I improve at sight-reading on the piano? How long should I study new music before I move on? How difficult should it be relative to what I can play with practice? Are there certain sets of exercises or pieces that are good to use?

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I've been doing sight reading practice daily por little more than a year and I've improved a lot but i still have several years ahead before i get fluent.

My only method is just right every day some new music. If it is easy i can play it faster and more accurate, if it is harder i read in a more clumsy way. And if it too hard i just skip it.

A year ago i started with Mozart childhood book, and now I'm reading his sonatas. (A lot of other music in beetwen) Reading slow but reading at least. Just 1 year ago it was imposible for me.

So this is the method that works for me. Read read and read. Downloads from imslp, music books, etc.

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Originally Posted by sara clark
How can I improve at sight (url=https://www.tejar.pk/)-(/url)reading on the piano?

Hi Sara!
I was going to answer your question when I discovered this very strange link. I changed the square brackets into round ones so it can be seen.
Why did you add this link?

Animisha


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Originally Posted by Ubu
I've been doing sight reading practice daily por little more than a year and I've improved a lot but i still have several years ahead before i get fluent.

My only method is just right every day some new music. If it is easy i can play it faster and more accurate, if it is harder i read in a more clumsy way. And if it too hard i just skip it.

A year ago i started with Mozart childhood book, and now I'm reading his sonatas. (A lot of other music in beetwen) Reading slow but reading at least. Just 1 year ago it was imposible for me.

So this is the method that works for me. Read read and read. Downloads from imslp, music books, etc.

Ubu gives great advice. I usually recommend picking up a traditional church hymnal. Read the four voice parts in each hymn and just keep turning pages. This way you have hundreds of elementary piano sight reading pieces.

Good luck!


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I have a very odd method but give it a try!

1 Find a song, musical piece in a level just slightly above your level

2 Listen to a good recording of the piece over and over again. Important: follow along with the music so you see
and hear at the same time every nuance. Just play bits and pieces that seem easy/comfortable to you.

3 If possible have the recording play while you are playing (It's a good way to find out if your piano needs tuning)

4 Then begin to play the piece somewhat slowly, knowing how it's supposed to sound. But you are going to be playing pieces of the music a little at a time up to tempo. (That tempo you have listened to over and over, in your head.

Tryin it!

Last edited by brdwyguy; 06/15/21 08:30 AM.

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Rhythm, ear training, harmony. Better you are at these, easier it is. Finding the keys not looking obviously takes practice. Chromatic scales for the black notes. Think like you can't see and have to trust fingers. Mistakes happen, but how will you know if you don't develop the ear? Of course, over time with practice you get better.

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Hi Joey
I have some reservations about your method; see what you think:
By listening to a piece over and over, aren’t you giving your brain an escape from quickly ‘see a note and rhythm snd play it’? I think you would be teaching yourself to copy what you hear, rather than what you see.

Traditionally, improvement in reading is not by repetitively listening but by reading new music—- lots of new music. You start recognizing patterns when you encounter them again.

If you become proficient, you would be able to play music you have never heard.
Just a thought


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Welcome to Piano World, Sara!

I'm right there with you, wanting to learn to read more fluently. Having played other musical instruments by ear all my life, and the piano for the last 15 years or so (and I'm now in my mid-60s), I tend to lean toward what I'm familiar with and comfortable with, and that is playing by ear.

Reading music notation requires work, and effort. When I sit at the piano, if I have a sheet of music in front of me, I can read/play a few notes really slowly, and then I'll stop and start playing something I like by ear, which puts a big smile on my face.

I just haven't put in the time and effort to learn to read fluently. In fact, I was once told by a seasoned piano teacher that at this point in my piano playing experience, there is really no point in me learning to read music. Not sure if that was a compliment or a criticism. smile

However, I'm currently working on "Alfred's Premier Piano Express, All in One Accelerated Course, Book 1", and have been watching some online courses on learning to read music for piano.

When I start practicing reading the music notation, and doing the exercises in the book, it is vastly different from just sitting down at the piano and ripping out something really fast by ear. The reading requires a learning curve, just like learning to play by ear required a learning curve. But I'm much further along the by-ear path (with a long way to go, still :-).

Take your time, and enjoy the process. (I should take my own advice... smile ).

Also, you might visit the "Adult Beginners Forum" sub-forum here. http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/forums/30/1/adult-beginners-forum.html

All the best!

Rick


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I'm not a good sight reader but I can say what works for me

>How can I improve at sight-reading on the piano?
practice 15 minutes per day or until you feel your concentration is dropping and mistakes increase Keep at it for a few years.


>How long should I study new music before I move on?
None at all. sight reading is done from first sight. So no studying, nor in advance nor after. Now of course you are allowed to "study" the music while playing. So if you can look ahead 10 bars and study that bar in detail while playing the first 9, that's good.


>How difficult should it be relative to what I can play with practice?
Way easier. I can play level 9 but sight reading maybe 4. But it depends on how much you invest in sight reading versus studying pieces.

Are there certain sets of exercises or pieces that are good to use?
Yes, sightread pieces with elements that you also encounter in pieces that you really want to play :-)


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Originally Posted by Animisha
Originally Posted by sara clark
How can I improve at sight (url=https://www.tejar.pk/)-(/url)reading on the piano?

Hi Sara!
I was going to answer your question when I discovered this very strange link. I changed the square brackets into round ones so it can be seen.
Why did you add this link?

Animisha


It's a clumsy attempt at SEO for the linked site (i.e. to improve its relative position in search results).


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Originally Posted by sara clark
How can I improve at sight-reading on the piano? How long should I study new music before I move on? How difficult should it be relative to what I can play with practice? Are there certain sets of exercises or pieces that are good to use?

Sara:

There is much discussion about sight-reading in the Adult Beginners' Forum and in the Pianist Corner, both forums on Piano Wrld.

Regards,


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Hi
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by Animisha
Originally Posted by sara clark
How can I improve at sight (url=https://www.tejar.pk/)-(/url)reading on the piano?

Hi Sara!
I was going to answer your question when I discovered this very strange link. I changed the square brackets into round ones so it can be seen.
Why did you add this link?

Animisha


It's a clumsy attempt at SEO for the linked site (i.e. to improve its relative position in search results).

Sarah’s profile contact email is to an Seo


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
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Originally Posted by Rickster
Welcome to Piano World, Sara!

I'm right there with you, wanting to learn to read more fluently. Having played other musical instruments by ear all my life, and the piano for the last 15 years or so (and I'm now in my mid-60s), I tend to lean toward what I'm familiar with and comfortable with, and that is playing by ear.

Reading music notation requires work, and effort. When I sit at the piano, if I have a sheet of music in front of me, I can read/play a few notes really slowly, and then I'll stop and start playing something I like by ear, which puts a big smile on my face.

I just haven't put in the time and effort to learn to read fluently. In fact, I was once told by a seasoned piano teacher that at this point in my piano playing experience, there is really no point in me learning to read music. Not sure if that was a compliment or a criticism. smile

However, I'm currently working on "Alfred's Premier Piano Express, All in One Accelerated Course, Book 1", and have been watching some online courses on learning to read music for piano.

When I start practicing reading the music notation, and doing the exercises in the book, it is vastly different from just sitting down at the piano and ripping out something really fast by ear. The reading requires a learning curve, just like learning to play by ear required a learning curve. But I'm much further along the by-ear path (with a long way to go, still :-).

Take your time, and enjoy the process. (I should take my own advice... smile ).

Also, you might visit the "Adult Beginners Forum" sub-forum here. http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/forums/30/1/adult-beginners-forum.html

All the best!

Rick


I wouldn't agree with your teacher's assessment there. Keep at your reading if that's what you want to improve.

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Unfortunately it looks as if Sara isn't really looking for sight reading help but more likely trying to boost her web-site's score each time we quote her post.

Shock, horror, who would have thought it?

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Originally Posted by gwing
Unfortunately it looks as if Sara isn't really looking for sight reading help but more likely trying to boost her web-site's score each time we quote her post.

Shock, horror, who would have thought it?

I am glad somebody else also picked it up. smile


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Originally Posted by gwing
Unfortunately it looks as if Sara isn't really looking for sight reading help but more likely trying to boost her web-site's score each time we quote her post.

Shock, horror, who would have thought it?


Which website? I don't see any website links to click on...

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Originally Posted by fatar760
Originally Posted by gwing
Unfortunately it looks as if Sara isn't really looking for sight reading help but more likely trying to boost her web-site's score each time we quote her post.

Shock, horror, who would have thought it?


Which website? I don't see any website links to click on...

Oh is it the cursor change on the hyphen?

Last edited by fatar760; 06/15/21 12:55 PM.
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Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
It's a clumsy attempt at SEO for the linked site (i.e. to improve its relative position in search results).

Sarah’s profile contact email is to an Seo


Interesting. I hadn't even looked that far, and just assumed that the linked site was the OP's own, given the extremely amateurish attempt at SEO.

But it's another indicator that the OP is an amateur. For example, Joe.SEO@gmail.com looks much less professional than Joe@AwesomeSEO.com would. This is effectively two strikes: 1) it doesn't look professional, and 2) it's a missed opportunity to actually improve their own SEO.

Strike 3 is that it's largely ineffective. I'm not going to explain why, because I'm not interested in helping the OP improve their "craft," but I will point out that it's unethical and unprofessional for a "professional" in the industry to be posting bogus content and spam in this way.


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At least the website looks legit grin

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I would not trust learning to read music, or anything else, by someone who does not read enough to find out whether the place where he or she is posting is an appropriate area or not.


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