2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
108 members (astrotoy, Amadeus M., Andy R, APianistHasNoName, Abdol, Anglagard44, AndyOnThePiano, Animisha, 23 invisible), 1,524 guests, and 452 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 153
E
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 153
The problem with playing the piano is that it's just so (too) much effort.

I hadn't played saxophone for over 20 years, and now I'm playing two (simple) pieces on it together with a friend on the piano. I DON'T NEED to practice, I just sight-read it. Imagine that on the piano.

I can play the piano reasonably well for an amateur, but the hours I / we put in are just ridiculous IMO. I think you can only play the piano if you enjoy the practicing process or if you're a natural talent. Otherwise it's not worth it.

Joined: May 2017
Posts: 230
C
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 230
I enjoy everything about the process. I enjoy the look of the piano, the look/feel of the keyboard. I love to play - what some people call practicing. Playing, practicing .... all the same for me.

Been like that all my life. One of my earliest memories as a toddler is being drawn to a piano keyboard. I'm 70 now! Yikes! What happened?

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 7,243
7000 Post Club Member
Online Content
7000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 7,243
Piano playing is a passion for life. It needs extreme dedication but when you love something that is part of the pleasure. If you just wanted to find a new hobby and expected that you would play decently after only a few weeks, you chose the wrong hobby.

Last edited by CyberGene; 06/07/21 04:54 AM.

My YouTube, My Soundcloud
Currently: Yamaha N1X, DIY hybrid controller -> Garritan CFX
Previously: NU1X, ES7, MP6, CA63, RD-700SX, CDP-100, FP-5, P90, SP-200
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,702
C
2000 Post Club Member
Online Content
2000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,702
All you have to do is sit there. That's pretty easy.

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,991
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,991
There are certain pieces that are advanced we'd be spending hours learning them 1 at a time. And other pieces like Christmas songs arranged for easy piano we'd just play off the score without having to practice them first. I've seen people (students & teachers) who can read through pieces at certain levels. The more proficient the reading level, the more pieces you can read through without practicing first. There is the Lead Sheet option of playing LH chords for people who doesn't like to read the bass clef. And there are those who are good at playing by ear.

Piano is an instrument you need to play with both hands unless you're playing beginner pieces with the LH & RH alternating playing 1 note at a time like a saxophone. The way people read advance piano pieces is by intervals & chords. If you feel that you need to learn /rehearse every piece before playing it with confidence, your reading & ear training haven't reach a high level. If you like playing piano, be patient. In the beginning there will be hands coordination issues.

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 30,882
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 30,882
All instruments require tons of practice to play advanced and difficult pieces. The OPs premise is not valid.

Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 153
E
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 153
Sight reading on a melody instrument is so easy in comparison. On a melody-instrument the difference between the level you can play and the level you can sight-read is small, on the the piano it's huge (for me anyway, and for the piano players I know as well).

I'm not a beginner on either instrument. I'm not asking for advice. It's just that there are times when I have trouble motivating myself for serious practice. Most of the time I enjoy it, but not always.

My premise is not valid? It's not a premise, it's experience. Sure, professional world-class horn players practice multiple hours a day, but on the piano you need that practice-time to get to a halfway decent amateur level.

I can hear the chant already: then practice your sight-reading. Yes, I can do that, but that takes time as well.

Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 123
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 123
I think it also has to do with what we want to be able to play, how good, sound/expression, artistic level and so on. Some pieces sound very easy but are difficult to play and the opposite. It ain't easy to play John Coltrane pieces/solos either. Many hours of practice on the saxophone to reach similar level.

But, I see your point and we can't do everything and we need to prioritize what we want, think is worth spending our time on.

Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,935
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,935
Quote
Sight reading on a melody instrument is so easy in comparison.

I totally agree with this. I’ve played clarinet, folk and classical guitar, shakuhachi (Japanese bambo flute) and taiko (Japanese drums). Only classical guitar comes close the complexity of piano. For all of the others, reading and learning a new piece, even of a more advanced level, is just plain easier than reading and learning a piece of similar level on the piano. (And I say that as a fairly confident reader at the piano).

When I first started piano, I had been playing classical guitar, and had gotten to a certain level and plateaued (no teacher). When I started playing piano I was just amazed at how easy it seemed in comparison to classical guitar. I eventually realized that that was a false impression, based only on the ease of finding the notes and getting a correct sound with them. I am now convinced that piano music, and the act of playing it, is just much more complex.

Yes, any instrument is challenging at the most advanced levels, but playing only one melody line at a time is never going to compare to what we do at the piano in terms of complexity.


Started piano June 1999.
Proud owner of a Yamaha C2

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 8,791
Silver Subscriber
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 8,791
I invite you to read a post in the ABF—/ ‘musings’ . IMHO, it is fitting for beginners or those that have been playing many years

http://forum.pianoworld.com//ubbthr...a-most-solitary-pursuit.html#Post3125321


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: Dec 2020
Posts: 177
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Dec 2020
Posts: 177
I agree with the premise that you must enjoy the practicing process in order to become good at playing the piano. This is true of pretty much any non-trivial learning experience. As a computer programmer, I can tell you that if you don't enjoy the process of problem analysis, solution development, coding and testing, you will never become a proficient programmer. If you view the process as an unpleasant chore, it's very difficult to (essentially) torture yourself for a sufficiently-long period of time to get good at it.

Learning to play the piano is a much more pleasant process, though, than learning to play something like the violin. This is simply because striking a piano key produces a sound that is pleasant to the ear, and (at a basic level) the "striking" of the key requires no great level of manual dexterity or finger control. Compare that to the act of drawing a bow across a string on an instrument that is not fretted, where the position of your finger on the string determines whether or not the note produced matches the desired note. Learning to play an instrument like the violin is, IMHO, much more difficult than the piano, simply because, in the beginning, your ears are pleading with you to STOP MAKING THAT HORRIBLE NOISE!

Beginning students of piano have it pretty easy, in my opinion. Of course, we face different problems, like learning to coordinate two voices, each played with a different hand, but the general pleasantness of the instrument's sounds makes it much easier to stick with it, and enjoy the learning process.


"I think it's the excitement only a free man can feel; a free man at the start of a long journey, whose conclusion is uncertain." -- Morgan Freeman's character, "Red", in The Shawshank Redemption
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,270
S
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,270
Originally Posted by ErfurtBob
The problem with playing the piano is that it's just so (too) much effort.

I hadn't played saxophone for over 20 years, and now I'm playing two (simple) pieces on it together with a friend on the piano. I DON'T NEED to practice, I just sight-read it. Imagine that on the piano.

I think a number of instruments are just as difficult, in different ways. Classical guitar certainly (maybe even more difficult), but also the violin, cello, alto, ..... At least to get something musical.

My experience is that many hobbies require a lot of hours of practice to master them and reach a reasonably good level. But of course there are also hobbies which you can practice and get pleasure from without being a good player or player at all. Just like you can get pleasure from piano as a beginner. It is impatience that creates frustration.

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,002
J
jdw Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,002
It's true, melody sight reading is way easier. Of course, you do have to have the embouchure (on the flute anyway, my other instrument). Luckily, I like practicing the piano even though my sight reading will never get to the level I have on flute. If I practiced sight reading enough to get really good at it on the piano, I'll bet my melody reading would get better also and would still be ahead.


1989 Baldwin R
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 1,856
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 1,856
Originally Posted by ErfurtBob
The problem with playing the piano is that it's just so (too) much effort. [...] I think you can only play the piano if you enjoy the practicing process or if you're a natural talent. Otherwise it's not worth it.

Quite true! And if you enjoy the practicing process, like I do, and if you enjoy the rich and beautiful sounds you make also while practising, the effort is not relevant.

Originally Posted by SeaDrive
Learning to play the piano is a much more pleasant process, though, than learning to play something like the violin.[...] simply because, in the beginning, your ears are pleading with you to STOP MAKING THAT HORRIBLE NOISE.

Quite true as well!


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 8,791
Silver Subscriber
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 8,791
Originally Posted by SeaDrive
...

Learning to play the piano is a much more pleasant process, though, than learning to play something like the violin. This is simply because striking a piano key produces a sound that is pleasant to the ear, and (at a basic level) the "striking" of the key requires no great level of manual dexterity or finger control. Compare that to the act of drawing a bow across a string on an instrument that is not fretted, where the position of your finger on the string determines whether or not the note produced matches the desired note. Learning to play an instrument like the violin is, IMHO, much more difficult than the piano, simply because, in the beginning, your ears are pleading with you to STOP MAKING THAT HORRIBLE NOISE!
...!.


This made me laugh as I remembered starting playing the violin as a child and how the sound was like a cat caught with its tail in a screen door 🙀 not true of the piano. I didn’t need adult ears to know the horror of the sound I was making.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,991
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,991
Playing a string instrument like a violin, you need to pull the bow gently and takes a lot of trial & error to get the tuning right. When your finger is off a bit, it’s out of tune. When I took up violin playing in school, we often make fun of beginner students as trying to “slaughter a chicken” with the bow.

Making the transition to a piano wasn’t a big deal since I can read the treble well and count different rhythms. In the beginning, the focus was on playing the right notes at a constant volume that dynamic variations weren’t played.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,893
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,893
Originally Posted by ErfurtBob
I can play the piano reasonably well for an amateur, but the hours I / we put in are just ridiculous IMO. I think you can only play the piano if you enjoy the practicing process or if you're a natural talent. Otherwise it's not worth it.
If you are satisfied with your current level, whatever it may be, just a few minutes a day playing the stuff you enjoy - even if it's just Für Elise smirk - will keep you there.

The vast majority of students never get above a certain standard (often nowhere near the level they could have reached if they really put the work in) because they perceive that they don't enjoy the process of practicing in relation to the satisfaction they get from being able to play better, i.e. that the 'work': enjoyment ratio isn't doing it for them.

Many then switch to non-classical.......and why not? You then don't need to play what's printed in the page, because there's nothing on the page, or you can simplify/change what's on it to your heart's content, and call it improv (or improve)......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 24
Q
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Q
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 24
I don't have the experience of playing any other instrument, but I do think that many people enjoy every aspect of playing the piano, so it doesn't feel too arduous. I'm one of those who enjoys practicing, so I don't mind the effort playing the piano takes. I can hardly see a piano without feeling an overwhelming urge to play it. I practice every day for at least two hours and I'd certainly rather be doing that than going out with friends or watching TV or even reading a book or any number of other things other people spend their spare time on. Playing the piano well is certainly much too involved and time consuming to do if you don't enjoy it.

Joined: Jul 2016
Posts: 741
P
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Jul 2016
Posts: 741
Anything worth doing is worth ‘the practice’. Another hobby is sourdough bread…it too requires a lot of practice, new flour, new hydration….the end results, just like freshly baked sourdough bread, your audience will love it. Life is like that, it’s all practice. We still weather through the humps. Yeah, practice is the zen.


Dream came true : playing the piano
Kawai CS11/Yamaha Arius 161
lessons: 150 hours + counting
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 545
R
500 Post Club Member
Online Content
500 Post Club Member
R
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 545
I think it's definitely true that learning to play the piano takes more time than most instruments -- it also has a higher ceiling. At the higher levels, you acquire nearly complete finger independence in both hands (just imagine playing Chopin op 10 no 4 at a fast tempo), the ability to process 3-4 voices at once, etc. However, these skills feel amazing once acquired -- when you can successfully play or create music with multiple moving parts, and successfully control all of it at once and make meaningful decisions in real time, you almost feel superhuman!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Garritan with Sibelius "sound set" ?
by RinTin - 09/28/21 03:13 PM
help teaching an autistic child
by sheilaju - 09/28/21 02:33 PM
Old Kawai MP6
by johan d - 09/28/21 02:04 PM
Half Pedaling reality check
by Dore - 09/28/21 12:47 PM
Confused.
by Cutec - 09/28/21 10:43 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
What's Hot!!
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Our Free Newsletter for Piano Lovers!
The summer edition of our free newsletter
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics209,335
Posts3,135,861
Members102,845
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5