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Hi, I am the happy owner of a Kawai ES920, which I left in my main apartment.
The problem is that I recently moved abroad, expecting to move on at least one or two more accommodation within the same city, and probably will leave the country for good in one year time or so.

I need something decent to keep writing my music on and keep playing (mainly movie sountracks, not classical music) without losing my skills. At the same time, I need to find a compromise on size/weight.
It is likely that I will have to move to another apartment in one month, so I will have to pack my stuff and move it, including the piano. Also, in one year time I may want to sell it, but who knows.

So, there are two very different ideas here:
-Kawai ES110: 12 kg, actual piano size, I had the opportunity to try it: felt plasticky, but playable. No compromises on keys quality for a low-end piano. May be relative easy to sell, since it's quite popular.
-Roland Go piano: 8 kg less to carry around and smaller in size, good reviews on this forum, though some people elsewhere seem to not like the keys at all, so I am afraid it could be too much of a compromise.

Is there that much difference in terms of quality of the keys?
Any other suggestions? Thanks!

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First you'll need to decide if the keyboard needs to feel like a piano. The GO:PIANO does not as the action is not weighted/is not a hammer action.

Have you ever played on "synths" and "keyboards" i.e. those things without weighted keys like Yamaha PSR, Casio CTK models and such?

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Originally Posted by clothearednincompo
First you'll need to decide if the keyboard needs to feel like a piano. The GO:PIANO does not as the action is not weighted/is not a hammer action.

Have you ever played on "synths" and "keyboards" i.e. those things without weighted keys like Yamaha PSR, Casio CTK models and such?
Many years ago I used to play on a Yamaha DX7II. Then I bought a Yamaha P90, it was like night and day, and never really went back to actual synths keyboard (used to play modules with the P90).
So, does the go piano keyboard feels like playing a synth?

Last edited by Alfred La Fleur; 05/15/21 05:47 AM.
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I haven't played the GO:PIANO myself, but it's probably closer to the DX7II than a piano.

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Originally Posted by Alfred La Fleur
Any other suggestions? Thanks!

Yamaha P-121, 73 keys graded hammer action, 10 kg - one of the lightest DP compromises you can get. Before that model showed up on the market, people hat to saw off pianos.

Yamaha NP-32, 76 keys graded non-linear spring action, 5.7 kg - I own the predecessor NP-31 and it's my battery powered "go piano" that still fits into the backseat of a subcompact.


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At the moment Casio makes the most compact 88 key hammer action digital pianos.

They have the CDP-S models that are lower end have a "less elaborate" piano sound engine. And even within the CDP-S range the CDP-S350 has a slightly different (better) piano sound. (There are of course several at least in the 350.)

The Privia PX-S models have basically the same action and they then have the "AiR" sound engine with a more complete piano emulation with the resonances etc.

Some people find the short pivot length of the keys to be a problem. Others don't.

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I have seen some complaints on Go:piano keys feeling heavy (strong springs). You should try it yourself if you can.

Try Casio PX-S3000 too, it may work very well for you and it is small and light.

Another possibility, if a synth like acction is OK, is Studiologic Numa Compact 2 (and 2X if you want organ).


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Originally Posted by clothearednincompo
I haven't played the GO:PIANO myself, but it's probably closer to the DX7II than a piano.
Right. The GO and the DX7 are non-hammer actioms, the P90 and ES110 are hammer actions, it's a different animal. The mentioned Yamaha P-121 and Casio CDP-S/PX-S models would be hammer action smaller/lighter alternatives to the ES110 to look at.

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Originally Posted by JoeT
Yamaha P-121, 73 keys graded hammer action, 10 kg - one of the lightest DP compromises you can get. Before that model showed up on the market, people hat to saw off pianos.

Yamaha NP-32, 76 keys graded non-linear spring action, 5.7 kg - I own the predecessor NP-31 and it's my battery powered "go piano" that still fits into the backseat of a subcompact.
Hi JoeT, many thanks for the very interesting suggestions.
I did try the P45, and I did not like it that much, since I was looking for a top piano (this one was worse than my old old P90), but I can accept a compromise, since I am now looking for a secondary instrument to play.
Do they have full sized-keys? Would you be able to make a comparison between the p45 and the two you suggested?

Last edited by Alfred La Fleur; 05/15/21 08:24 AM.
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Ok, I will check those, thanks

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The Casio PX-S3000 should weight around 11 kg, just 1kg less than the ES110. I will check it, thanks.

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Originally Posted by anotherscott
Originally Posted by clothearednincompo
I haven't played the GO:PIANO myself, but it's probably closer to the DX7II than a piano.
Right. The GO and the DX7 are non-hammer actioms, the P90 and ES110 are hammer actions, it's a different animal. The mentioned Yamaha P-121 and Casio CDP-S/PX-S models would be hammer action smaller/lighter alternatives to the ES110 to look at.
I thought the go piano was more suitable to my case, but I am starting to thing that it's probably not.
Do you have any experience with the P121 an the two Casios you mentioned?

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Originally Posted by Alfred La Fleur
Originally Posted by JoeT
Yamaha P-121, 73 keys graded hammer action, 10 kg - one of the lightest DP compromises you can get. Before that model showed up on the market, people hat to saw off pianos.

Yamaha NP-32, 76 keys graded non-linear spring action, 5.7 kg - I own the predecessor NP-31 and it's my battery powered "go piano" that still fits into the backseat of a subcompact.
Hi JoeT, many thanks for the very interesting suggestions.
I did try the P45, and I did not like it that much, since I was looking for a top piano (this one was worse than my old old P90), but I can accept a compromise, since I am now looking for a secondary instrument to play.
Do they have full sized-keys? Would you be able to make a comparison between the p45 and the two you suggested?
I just scrolled my smartphone pictures and I found a P121B that I realized I tested a month before the very beginning of the pandemic. I was in this shop in London, where I found this curious looking small Yamaha DP (at a first glance, I thought it was 61 keys), which actually felt like my p90 and I remember I was kind of willing to buy it, I was impressed.

However, when I recently went to another shop, with the idea in mind to buy a top quality digital piano, I tested a p45 and I thought it was quite bad.

I don't know if my perception was fooled but the very different expectations, but I believe the P121 may be a lot better than the P45, but I may be wrong.

Last edited by Alfred La Fleur; 05/15/21 08:50 AM.
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Originally Posted by Alfred La Fleur
Do they have full sized-keys?

Yes. Mini-keys are only found on synths like Yamaha Reface.

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Would you be able to make a comparison between the p45 and the two you suggested?


The P-121 shares its action with the P-125 (similar to P-45) - with 73 instead of 88 keys - and the NP-32 shares its piano tone with the P-45.


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Originally Posted by JoeT
Yes. Mini-keys are only found on synths like Yamaha Reface.
The P-121 shares its action with the P-125 (similar to P-45) - with 73 instead of 88 keys - and the NP-32 shares its piano tone with the P-45.
Apparently, NP12 seems to have small-sized keys, but I double checked NP32 and you are right.
Ok, so P-121 and p-45 are not that different. Thanks.

Last edited by Alfred La Fleur; 05/15/21 09:14 AM.
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Yamaha's non-hammer action boards (like NP-32 and NP-12) have just slightly smaller than full-size piano keys (not like the Reface series, whose keys are MUCH smaller). BTW, Reface is not necessarily s synth. There are 4 Reface models. Two are synths, one is an organ, and one is electric piano.

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Since u already have the ES920 (great keyboard btw, I have one too) there's no reason to invest another rather large sum in purchasing a Yamaha P-121 or Kawai ES-100 those would be redundant. For much less money, round 200$ you can get the new Casio CT-S1 as a complementary, it has a really nice speaker system, 61 keys with light touch that's better than a Roland GO Piano (the Casio's keys are less shallow when down pressing). The whole thing weighs 4.5 kilos, on top of being battery operated, has a carrying handle and strap pins making it all portable no stand needed and can even wear it as a keytar. The sounds derived from a 2016 Aix sound chip and are absolutely AMAZING for a 200$ keyboard. Oh, and it has layer sounds option and can save registrations. AND you can choose between 3 colors.

I'd get one once it arrives here. perfect mobile keyboard to take anywhere, trips, jams, parks, beach, just put it in your car always, etc.
In the future you could also perform with the Casio as a top auxiliary keyboard (for additional organs, synths, brass, bells, etc.) having the ES920 as a buttom weighted "piano" board. Both have internal amplification so if you do really small venues that could even be enough.

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He'll be away from that ES920 for a year. From a piano perspective, a year seems like a long time to be playing nothing but something like a CT-S1.

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Originally Posted by Chummy
Since u already have the ES920 (great keyboard btw, I have one too) there's no reason to invest another rather large sum in purchasing a Yamaha P-121 or Kawai ES-100 those would be redundant. For much less money, round 200$ you can get the new Casio CT-S1 as a complementary, it has a really nice speaker system, 61 keys with light touch that's better than a Roland GO Piano (the Casio's keys are less shallow when down pressing). The whole thing weighs 4.5 kilos, on top of being battery operated, has a carrying handle and strap pins making it all portable no stand needed and can even wear it as a keytar. The sounds derived from a 2016 Aix sound chip and are absolutely AMAZING for a 200$ keyboard. Oh, and it has layer sounds option and can save registrations. AND you can choose between 3 colors.

I'd get one once it arrives here. perfect mobile keyboard to take anywhere, trips, jams, parks, beach, just put it in your car always, etc.
In the future you could also perform with the Casio as a top auxiliary keyboard (for additional organs, synths, brass, bells, etc.) having the ES920 as a buttom weighted "piano" board. Both have internal amplification so if you do really small venues that could even be enough.


I have ordered Casio CT-S1, and want to use it as a travel piano. I heard very good reviews about it. Has anyone out there received one yet? I heard that the ocean shipment to US has been delayed, and may not get until Mid-June.


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Originally Posted by anotherscott
He'll be away from that ES920 for a year. From a piano perspective, a year seems like a long time to be playing nothing but something like a CT-S1.
Exactly, I need something decent to play, but I am really looking into the Yamaha P-121, it was love at a first sight. Ideally, I would have liked a 61 keys version of it.
The NP-32 seems decent and very light-weight, but keys are not weighted and yes, keys size is slightly smaller than normal, even though there is a very tiny difference. Is this a problem? To me, it probably would be.


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