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Reasons Why You Should Practice after Piano Lessons
As long as you are learning piano and intend to master piano playing one day, you cannot skip daily practicing. It is true that effective practicing is one of the most important elements which can help piano students get improved step by step. But isn’t it tiresome for piano learners to be pushed to practice by their piano teachers and parents?

Apart from finding pleasure in piano learning, knowing the benefits of piano playing which are backed by science can also serve as an impetus for you to take the initiative to practice. The benefits can help shape your life, and you will never refuse to make your life better.
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Piano Playing Relieves Stress
A moderate amount of stress can do good to you, while too much pressure can exhaust you. To keep yourself motivated, relieving stress by playing the piano can be a fantastic way.

An article published in 2013 by the National Library of Medicine found that piano practice can actually help alleviate stress in elderly adults. Despite the studied demographic being older adults, these findings are encouraging for people of all ages that playing the piano can improve mental health.

People who play the piano tend to experience less anxiety, loneliness, and depression than their nonmusical counterparts. Playing for a few minutes a day can improve your self-esteem, make you feel more positive, and lower your blood pressure. Piano playing is also a widely used form of therapy for Attention Deficit Disorder.

Piano Playing Improves Aural Awareness
If you are able to feel and understand music while listening to it, you may find that music can make difference to your life. To feel the music deeply, you need to improve your aural awareness.

Do you have a naturally musical ear, or are you tone deaf? Playing the piano can improve your overall aural awareness no matter where you fall in this range. Through piano playing, you are trained to recognize tones, intervals, and chords, and develop a sense of pitch.

Good aural awareness makes it easier to identify and understand various sound patterns, and can help you if you have trouble hearing when there is a lot of background noise. Also, the improvement of aural awareness provides a chance for piano learners to be more aware of the charm of music and the emotional feeling of others through voice tone changes.
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Piano Playing Strengthens Hand Muscles & Hand-Eye Coordination
Good motor skills can not only make you more agile, but also bring you energy in some way. Piano playing requires asymmetrical motions of both hands and good hand-eye coordination, which makes it a helpful way to improve your motor skills.

A recent study on hand motor control in musicians suggests that piano performers have actually changed the cortical mapping to increase the speed of fingers. Playing the piano is like taking your fingers to the gym. As you practice on a regular basis, your fingers will inevitably strengthen. Yet the speed and the strength alone will not be the fingers’ greatest reward. Over time, your fingers will also become nimbler on the keys, and the repetitive motions of playing will increase your ability to coordinate the movements.

As a result, you will discover better what it means to “get a grip,” not just on the piano keyboard but on your life at large.

Piano Playing Helps Develop New Language Skills
It takes a long time for most people to learn a new language. The progress may be super fun, but unavoidably, challenging as well. New language skills can be improved in multiple ways, but have you ever known that piano playing can also help develop new language skills?

A study in the early 1990s discovered the “Mozart effect” in children, which showed that early language development and spatial-temporal intelligence could be boosted by piano lessons for preschoolers. Some of the auditory skills learned from piano playing enhance specific aspects of the perception of spoken language.
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Learning a new language may present an opportunity for you to live a different lifestyle. It can be even more appealing if you can get familiar with an instrument at the same time.

Piano Playing Encourages Creativity
Whether you are a creative person or not, you are likely to have felt the wonder of creativity before. Every piano learner may be able to harness the creative power one day, since piano playing can encourage creativity.

Dr. Ana Pinho at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm conducted a study on jazz pianists. By monitoring the piano players’ brain activity when they were playing, she found that the part of their brain responsible for default or stereotypical responses was actually turned off. Instead, during the jazz pianists’ playing, their improvisational ability was brought out to create unique, original sound and style.

It is always important to strengthen creativity, because it is the seed for new developments and new ideas which lead to a colorful life.
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Piano Playing Teaches You Perseverance and Discipline
No matter what you are focusing on at present, perseverance and discipline are must-have qualities which can contribute to your achievements.

Learning new songs on the piano takes time and effort. Until you can actually play a song fluently by heart, you may need to spend several weeks practicing it. As you look forward to being able to play the song, you are supposed to stay motivated, learn patience, and increase your perseverance. These skills will always help you when you are confronted with difficult tasks at school, university, or work.

Practicing the piano regularly also requires discipline. Some parts of the piano song you are working on may be so technically challenging that you will have to practice over and over again. At the beginning, it cannot be easy for you. Maybe you have to come up with some little treats to get yourself there. However, slowly but surely, you will get used to it, and being disciplined about your practicing time will not be hard any more. Likewise, you can follow the same steps to get more control over your own life.

Piano Playing Sharpens Your Concentration
The rapid pace of life has transformed many people into multitaskers. The fact highlights the importance of concentration even more.

Split concentration is an integral part of playing the piano, which helps sharpen your concentration skills. When you are playing the piano, you are also multitasking that you have to focus on the rhythm, pitch, tempo, note duration, and several other things, which makes the process of piano playing a multi-level concentration exercise. Once you become adept at piano playing, you may find that your concentration skills in the outside world are also greatly improved.

In fact, studies have shown that every time a musician picks up his or her instrument, there are fireworks going on in his or her brain. Playing a musical instrument is perhaps the only activity during which almost all brain areas are simultaneously activated. What’s more, regular music practice at an early age can make structural changes to the brain that stay with you for the rest of your life, making your brain more efficient both while playing and in extra-musical endeavors.
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Piano Playing Helps Improve Time Management & Organization Skills
Many of us have quite busy schedules. Unfortunately, scientists have not found a way to make one day last more than 24 hours yet. To get all your activities and duties done, you need to get them organized.

Piano playing can be particularly effective in challenging one’s ability to manage and organize their time since the mastery of piano techniques demands a routine practice schedule. Also, you have to understand how to schedule your practice sessions so that you can get the most benefit from them without feeling stressed when you are doing other things. For all piano learners, playing the piano is a great way to teach them the lifelong skills of time management.

It is always fascinating to spend your limited life participating in numerous interesting activities, but you can only manage to do so when you are able to organize your time well.

Piano Playing Enhances Your Physical Health
It is hard to say what is the fountain of youth on earth, but things which offer physical and physiological advantages can definitely play the role. Piano playing is supposed to be put on the list of these things, since it provides a plethora of health benefits that will supplement every part of your life.

A study by the University of Miami indicated that adults who play the piano in a regular basis experience increased levels of human growth hormone (HgH), which is responsible for cell reproduction and regeneration. This hormone also helps regulate body fluids, muscle and bone growth, metabolism, and perhaps even heart function. Besides, music has also been shown to reduce heart and respiratory rates, and to increase immune response.

Physical health is the basis of pursuing a life of development. As a piano player, you are fortunate to have a chance to enhance health while enjoying piano music.

Piano Playing Helps Expand Cultural Knowledge
Music is a language that crosses all barriers of age and ethnicity. Through learning and playing music, you are likely to meet new friends, experience new cultures, and even live a new life.

In a 2016 study of Amazonian women and men, musical preference was found to be strictly cultural and not hardwired into our brains. Counter to past assumptions about our brains’ preferences of dissonant versus consonant chords, the study’s findings support learning to play the piano as one way to expand our cultural knowledge of different sounds, styles and types of music. Especially for children, this exposure is critical to encouraging early open mindedness and cultural diversity.

Another wonderful thing about playing the piano is that you can share the music with other people. It is an amazing way to bring together larger communities, as well as smaller groups of family and friends.
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After learning about the trivia above, you may have a clear idea about what you will gain from practicing after piano lessons. No matter how old you are, there are a whole lot of reasons for you to learn piano. When you are playing the instrument, the benefits you gradually obtain can shape your life bit by bit. Once you have noticed the changes in your life, you will thank yourself for choosing piano to accompany you all along.

Ref:

https://www.pianoemporium.com/10-benefits-playing-piano/#:~:text=Regular%20piano%20playing%20offers%20different,pressure%20and%20increase%20immune%20response
https://www.steinway.com/news/features/the-benefits-of-playing-piano
https://www.lindebladpiano.com/blog/benefits-of-playing-piano
https://www.flowkey.com/en/benefits-playing-piano
https://www.pianodreamers.com/benefits-of-playing-piano/
https://www.pianistmagazine.com/blogs/5-remarkable-health-benefits-of-playing-the-piano/
https://www.edweek.org/leadership/music-on-the-mind/1998/04
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/12/scientists-creativity-pianists-brain-activity

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Thanks for sharing...

The science behind learning to play piano or music in general is not new. I've been playing with a music group for a decade. For someone like me I don't need convincing.

In the beginning I had trouble getting started because of the lack of talent & hands coordination. Once I got into playing, practice becomes a routine 1h/day thing.

There is the issue of age or the perceived notion that people have to start early (before age 10). As an adult learner, many of my teacher's students are retired or at that age already. We play piano as a hobby and don't have to think about becoming an advanced player. We're part of a growing trend of older adults who engage in activities to keep our mind active.

I definitely play music to relieve stress. The rest of the family are obsessed with getting ahead in their careers (the rat race). I'm getting burned out from work. I do push myself to learn new piano pieces and don't really think working on a difficult piece as being stressful.

Originally Posted by Liz Zhang
Playing for a few minutes a day can improve your self-esteem, make you feel more positive, and lower your blood pressure. Piano playing is also a widely used form of therapy for Attention Deficit Disorder.

The evidence is there to support music as an effective form of therapy. There are 2 ways to engage in music.

1. Passive listening: there are music therapy centers in my city to treat people with mental disorders.
2. Playing an instrument: unfortunately many don't think they have the talent or want to spend the time to learn an instrument.

There is an interesting case I came across. A family has several kids who had music lessons for at least a year. The parents got them into violin and then piano. They were not very keen playing and eventually quit. The youngest in the family started developing issues socializing in class and had to be home-schooled. Some people think he may have signs of Autism or Asperger's Syndrome. His father who is a doctor never came up with a diagnosis.

The teen just wants to play video games everyday and dad has no problem with it. His father took piano lessons for a few years but hated it and hasn't touch the instrument for ages. I'm not sure the father would be open to let his son play music as a form of therapy. As the father I'd let the teen develop an interest in music. I wouldn't push him into lessons or get him into playing specific repertoire. Just let him bang on the keys like a toy. I don't think letting the teen get glued to a screen for many hours is a good thing.

Many people had negative experiences with piano lessons as repetitive & boring academic exercises. The focus is on Classical music. We're suppose to spend years at it and eventually get to like it. We need to change the attitude we can have fun playing from day 1 and enjoy the music.

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I think these kinds of articles miss the point. Finding a list of extra "benefits" from playing piano some might not normally think of is not the best justification for playing. Much more important than anything mentioned in the articles is the pleasure one can get from playing music. If one does not experience that, I don't think any of the peripheral benefits are worth practicing the piano for because all of them can be gotten through many other activities. For example, playing video games would have many of the benefits listed in the article.

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To get the pleasure out of playing, people needs to like the pieces they get into. Many of us play pieces for a teacher but have no personal connection with them.

I've met a few people who took music lessons. Most of them are in my music group. We're used to learning new pieces all the time that we'd pick up unfamiliar ones and work on them. The others would only play in front of a teacher or the pieces they play have to be worked on with a teacher before they'd try it themselves.

During a pandemic we're spending more time at home. People like myself would practice music for an hour a day to relieve stress and boredom. There are people in the family who had taken piano lessons as long as I have but haven't heard any close relatives play lately (not without a teacher).

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Without the pleasure to be gained from piano playing and music making for one's own satisfaction, nothing else matters.

Certainly not performing for others (there are far easier ways to impress others, like juggling, doing hula hoops or somersaults or backflips, standing on one's head, even singing Nessun dorma/Casta diva out of tune etc).
Why would anyone have lessons on such a difficult instrument for years and years (if you're classically minded, which applies to everyone in Pianist Corner) unless you really love the music and what the piano is able to do under well-trained hands?

Unless, of course, if you're a kid and your parents forced you to......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
To get the pleasure out of playing, people needs to like the pieces they get into. Many of us play pieces for a teacher but have no personal connection with them.
I think an adult should certainly have a lot of say in the pieces, or at least most of the pieces, they study when taking lessons. And I think that should apply to teenagers and maybe even pre teens also. At a minimum the teacher can provide a selection of pieces and then have the student choose among them. Almost every classical piece is available on YT to listen to.

Of course, six decades ago when I took lessons, most of us probably played just what the teacher assigned but that doesn't mean that approach has to stay the same forever.

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Originally Posted by bennevis
Certainly not performing for others (there are far easier ways to impress others, like juggling, doing hula hoops or somersaults or backflips, standing on one's head, even singing Nessun dorma/Casta diva out of tune etc).

Juggling is not easy....

zeroing in on perhaps the least important point in the entire thread whome


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Yeah it's important to play the music we really love.
Or the whole process can be tedious.

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This is one of those puff piece articles written to sell pianos.

If someone plays piano for any of these (side quests) reasons, that guarantees mediocrity. grin

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Bravo EinLudov!
Enough of half baked trivialities, and in the 10 reasons I did not read for the joy of music!

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Nearly every hobby or activity has some side benefits ... and negative consequences. And so is piano playing. There are a number of drawbacks that are rarely mentionned. And i am skeptical about the so called health benefits.

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Originally Posted by EinLudov
If someone plays piano for any of these (side quests) reasons, that guarantees mediocrity. grin
While most of the best pianists probably don't play piano for any of the reasons in the article, it is an exaggeration to say someone guaranteed mediocrity if one plays the piano for any of the reasons mentioned.

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Originally Posted by EinLudov
This is one of those puff piece articles written to sell pianos.

Aha, I was wondering what the reason is for this article.

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Originally Posted by ErfurtBob
Originally Posted by EinLudov
This is one of those puff piece articles written to sell pianos.

Aha, I was wondering what the reason is for this article.

One of the references in the first post is from pianoemporium .com
Amazingly, this is in the store blog


https://www.pianoemporium.com/10-benefits-playing-piano/


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

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Originally Posted by Sidokar
Nearly every hobby or activity has some side benefits ... and negative consequences. And so is piano playing. There are a number of drawbacks that are rarely mentionned. And i am skeptical about the so called health benefits.


Agreed, but piano / music is also one of the most elevated art form, we shouldn't just equate it with any other hobby / activity.

Originally Posted by Liz Zhang
Yeah it's important to play the music we really love.
Or the whole process can be tedious.


I have to respectfully disagree, especially when you are in the learning process.

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Originally Posted by newport
Originally Posted by Liz Zhang
Yeah it's important to play the music we really love.Or the whole process can be tedious.
I have to respectfully disagree, especially when you are in the learning process.
At every level, for every type of music, and for every desired skill a teacher thinks is important there's a huge variety of music available to select from. So why not mostly choose something the student likes as opposed to something they don't?

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by newport
Originally Posted by Liz Zhang
Yeah it's important to play the music we really love.Or the whole process can be tedious.
I have to respectfully disagree, especially when you are in the learning process.
At every level, for every type of music, and for every desired skill a teacher thinks is important there's a huge variety of music available to select from. So why not mostly choose something the student likes as opposed to something they don't?

We are talking about the training and the practicing of art. There are of course many different ways to get there. If I am a teacher, I would not force anything on my student, but I wound not constantly ask them what they like or what don't like either because in many cases the student will have to take a long time to learn to like it.

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Originally Posted by newport
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by newport
Originally Posted by Liz Zhang
Yeah it's important to play the music we really love.Or the whole process can be tedious.
I have to respectfully disagree, especially when you are in the learning process.
At every level, for every type of music, and for every desired skill a teacher thinks is important there's a huge variety of music available to select from. So why not mostly choose something the student likes as opposed to something they don't?
We are talking about the training and the practicing of art. There are of course many different ways to get there. If I am a teacher, I would not force anything on my student, but I wound not constantly ask them what they like or what don't like either because in many cases the student will have to take a long time to learn to like it.
The overwhelming percentage of people choosing to take piano lessons are not concerned about learning some "art". They think/hope they'll get some enjoyment. I was very careful in my wording to include "mostly" because there are some times when it would be important for a student to learn a particular piece even if they weren't enamored with it. But I think those times are rare.

If a student hates Bach, why not see if they like Scarlatti better? They can try some Bach in the future. If a student doesn't like a particular Bach P&F there are many others at a similar level to offer them. If a teacher wants a student to learn a Chopin Mazurka why not give them a choice of several and have them learn the one they like most? If a student doesn't enjoy classical music why not let them study at least some pieces of non classical music?

Being motivated is one of the most important things in learning something, and IMO enjoying the pieces one is studying is one of the most basic ways to motivate someone.

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
...

If a student hates Bach, why not see if they like Scarlatti better? They can try some Bach in the future. If a student doesn't like a particular Bach P&F there are many others at a similar level to offer them. If a teacher wants a student to learn a Chopin Mazurka why not give them a choice of several and have them learn the one they like most? If a student doesn't enjoy classical music why not let them study at least some pieces of non classical music?

Being motivated is one of the most important things in learning something, and IMO enjoying the pieces one is studying is one of the most basic ways to motivate someone.

(This is not a response to your response :-)

With all due respect, I don't like to take a low-context approach when dealing with art. It's not all science and very personal, also a kind of ritual and a believe system. If you go into them with an utilitarianism attitude you will only get part of the benefit.

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