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So I went to Melbourne to try the S7X at the Yamaha center. Three things, two positive and one maybe not so positive (depending on your point of view).

1. The bass is absolutely phenomenal. The bass on a C7X is good, but the S7X is a step above again. Yamaha put their own custom made bass strings in the SX series, but I'm guessing it's the acoustic resonance enhancement that is responsible. Even the CFX in the showroom wasn't necessarily better in the bass (although different in character due to the longer strings). Puts Fazioli to shame. Best bass I've ever heard, with the possible exception of the Steinway D.

2. Delicate pp playing is excellent due to the action. The crisp and delicate sound can be very beautiful.

3. And now something I'm not sure I like so much. The treble registers have a crisp sound with a strong attack and relatively low sustain behavior. You have to use percussive hand movements to get a strong sound out of the treble, especially if you want it to compete with the overwhelming bass. As someone else mentioned, it may not really sing in the treble compared to some other pianos. Lower sustain in the treble probably also means less smearing on the melody when holding the pedal down.

Comparing against the C7X in the same showroom, the S7X had a much nicer bass and a more refined sound. The biggest difference between the two was the bass IMO.

While I was in Melbourne, I decided to visit the Hailun dealer and try the Hailun 218 again, which is less than a third the price of the Yamaha S7X. I was actually very impressed. The bass is powerful, not comparable to the S7x, but still very good. But the main thing I noticed is that the treble has a very high sustain and "sings".

I guess it depends what kind of music you play. If you're playing something with relatively few notes and a nice melody, high sustain in the treble is good. But if you're playing something like Rach 3 with a lot of notes where you don't really hold the notes long anyway, the strong attack behavior of the Yamaha will give you the clarity and brilliance that you want. The Yamaha's feel like more sophisticated pianos with superior actions to the Hailuns, however.

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How was the treble on the C7X? Interested to see what you decide.

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Same as the S7X in terms of the crisp behaviour. Just doesn't have quite the same refined tone / harmonic profile.

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My 2 cents is that if the treble isn't very musical then it would be hard to enjoy such a piano. The Hailun sounds like the overall winner here as it sounds more balanced.

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I would not say it isn't musical. The crisp sound is beautiful in it's own way, and also sounds nice for Chopin and Scriabin. It's just lower sustain than some other pianos.

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I wonder whether treble would improve somewhat with playing in?

Last edited by dhull100; 04/11/21 05:33 PM.
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In James Pavel Shawcross's video on the S7X he absolutely loved the crisp treble. Something to keep in mind.

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Originally Posted by Sonepica
I would not say it isn't musical. The crisp sound is beautiful in it's own way, and also sounds nice for Chopin and Scriabin. It's just lower sustain than some other pianos.

I would imagine that you want long sustain for most of Chopin’s works. And early Scriabin, for that matter.

Am very glad you were able to try some instruments in person, and side by side.


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Seems like it is not “the one”.

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No piano is perfect. Even the Bosendorfer 214VC for double the price I found fault with its lack of power, particularly in the tenor region.

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So is it “the one” ?

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Did they have an S6x on the floor that you were able to play again? Perhaps that would have more of the balance you seek between registers.


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The 6's if anything have less sustain in the treble than the 7's.

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Originally Posted by Sonepica
In James Pavel Shawcross's video on the S7X he absolutely loved the crisp treble. Something to keep in mind.
You cannot be serious!

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I like his Volvo vs Bentley analogy in this video .

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You should consider asking the dealer if they can improve the sustain in the treble. It's possible that either with tuning or voicing it can be improved a little. OTOH even if it improves, any improvement might not be lasting. Unless you have 100K* to spend, buying a piano usually involves some compromises.

I don't think many would find the treble in this video lacking in sustain:

Last edited by pianoloverus; 04/11/21 06:47 PM.
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Originally Posted by Sonepica
So I went to Melbourne to try the S7X at the Yamaha center. Three things, two positive and one maybe not so positive (depending on your point of view).

1. The bass is absolutely phenomenal. The bass on a C7X is good, but the S7X is a step above again. Yamaha put their own custom made bass strings in the SX series, but I'm guessing it's the acoustic resonance enhancement that is responsible. Even the CFX in the showroom wasn't necessarily better in the bass (although different in character due to the longer strings). Puts Fazioli to shame. Best bass I've ever heard, with the possible exception of the Steinway D.

2. Delicate pp playing is excellent due to the action. The crisp and delicate sound can be very beautiful.

3. And now something I'm not sure I like so much. The treble registers have a crisp sound with a strong attack and relatively low sustain behavior. You have to use percussive hand movements to get a strong sound out of the treble, especially if you want it to compete with the overwhelming bass. As someone else mentioned, it may not really sing in the treble compared to some other pianos. Lower sustain in the treble probably also means less smearing on the melody when holding the pedal down.

Comparing against the C7X in the same showroom, the S7X had a much nicer bass and a more refined sound. The biggest difference between the two was the bass IMO.

While I was in Melbourne, I decided to visit the Hailun dealer and try the Hailun 218 again, which is less than a third the price of the Yamaha S7X. I was actually very impressed. The bass is powerful, not comparable to the S7x, but still very good. But the main thing I noticed is that the treble has a very high sustain and "sings".

I guess it depends what kind of music you play. If you're playing something with relatively few notes and a nice melody, high sustain in the treble is good. But if you're playing something like Rach 3 with a lot of notes where you don't really hold the notes long anyway, the strong attack behavior of the Yamaha will give you the clarity and brilliance that you want. The Yamaha's feel like more sophisticated pianos with superior actions to the Hailuns, however.

How was the treble sustain on the CFX? Perhaps a CF6 would be more to your liking?


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Originally Posted by j&j
How was the treble sustain on the CFX? Perhaps a CF6 would be more to your liking?

The CFX treble sustain might have been slightly better than the S7X/C7X. But not as good as the Hailun 218. I suspect the CF6 would have the same characteristics. I think it's Yamahas in general, rather than specifically the new CX/SX pianos.

But while playing fast passages from the Rach 3 on the Hailun 218, I also felt that the Yamaha may have had the edge. This is because the sound on a longer sustain piano doesn't have time to develop when playing rapidly, giving the strong attack on the Yamaha the edge.

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Sonepica
In James Pavel Shawcross's video on the S7X he absolutely loved the crisp treble. Something to keep in mind.
You cannot be serious!

laugh thumb

Maybe hold out for the new Bosendorfer 230 VC ? Unless its price is prohibitive.

I've played the S7X, CF6, CX7 and 214 VC all in the same room. As a Jazz player, my preference would be the CF6, because of the clarity and tone. The S7X is fabulous and has, as mentioned, the bigger bass but it also has an overall softer hue to the sound-- like a Bosendorfer.

If I were strictly a classical player-- 214 VC all the way, no question. Most refined sound out all of them but over the long haul, I think, as a Jazz player, I might (?) tire of the sound and yearn for the girth of a NY Steinway, or possibly a Fazioli. Or even a traditional C7X.

On the other hand, any of the Yamahas mentioned, especially the S7X, would be great to own, just being highly super picky.

Sounds like the S7X isn't the one if you have doubts about it beforehand. For that kind of money, you have to absolutely love it unconditionally. wink

Originally Posted by dhull100
I wonder whether treble would improve somewhat with playing in?

An expert/elite tech can do wonders with voicing.

Last edited by Dave Ferris; 04/11/21 08:12 PM.

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Originally Posted by Sonepica
Originally Posted by j&j
How was the treble sustain on the CFX? Perhaps a CF6 would be more to your liking?
The CFX treble sustain might have been slightly better than the S7X/C7X. But not as good as the Hailun 218.
I have heard the CFX at least 20 times in recitals. I think the idea that this piano is lacking in sustain or anything else is totally wrong.

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