2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
51 members (beginagain, An Old Square, 36251, anotherscott, APianistHasNoName, Abdol, ambrozy, 13 invisible), 605 guests, and 462 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
#3065418 01/05/21 08:32 AM
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 18
N
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
N
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 18
Okay, PianoWorld members seem friendly, supportive and knowledgeable with well thought-out responses - except for a thread about Ludovico Einaudi.

This may seem like a humble brag, and perhaps it is partly, but I think my piano teacher is pushing me too far, too fast. My first lesson was at the beginning of Sept 20 and now she’s got me playing one of Grieg’s Lyric Pieces (waltz).

My question is should I worry about missing out on fundamentals or should I just go for it? She says I could splash about in the shallow end for longer but there’s little she can do for me down there. She is an ABRSM ex-examiner so I presume she knows what they talking about.

Full disclosure - I did take a couple of years lessons about 40 years ago until I failed Grade 2 and have subsequently played guitar, saxophone, ukulele and did some choral singing.

If my teacher is reading this - hi!

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 7,062
7000 Post Club Member
Offline
7000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 7,062
I don't have any advice for you about your specific question, but

Originally Posted by NordWest
Okay, PianoWorld members seem friendly, supportive and knowledgeable with well thought-out responses - except for a thread about Ludovico Einaudi.

I always love a good shout-out! whome

Actually, I do have a comment about your question. Given your musical background, and the fact that playing actual repertoire pieces is a great way to get fundamentals, I don't think she's pushing you too fast. If the pieces you're working on are so hard that it takes forever to get them playable and it's hard to maintain your motivation, then probably those pieces are too hard. But if you're moving along a pace that works for you, it's probably fine.


Started piano June 1999.
Proud owner of a Yamaha C2

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 190
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 190
When I restarted piano I thought my teacher dropped me in the deep end by presenting pieces that took months to learn. If you can play this lyric piece from the music in say one month perhaps it is ok, anything very much longer and I would suggest it is too difficult.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,068
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,068
Originally Posted by NordWest
Full disclosure - I did take a couple of years lessons about 40 years ago until I failed Grade 2 and have subsequently played guitar, saxophone, ukulele and did some choral singing.
If you can read music in both clefs, and all your fingers are working fine pianistically, you might be OK.

If you're still struggling after two or three weeks to play the notes slowly, tell your teacher you need to go back a few steps. (Grieg's Op.12/2 is ABRSM Grade 4 standard).

Teachers teaching adults - especially those who have had lessons as kids - often start them playing pieces at intermediate level quickly, probably because they might get bored otherwise. What other pieces have you learnt with her so far?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,561
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,561
Originally Posted by NordWest
Okay, PianoWorld members seem friendly, supportive and knowledgeable with well thought-out responses - except for a thread about Ludovico Einaudi.

This may seem like a humble brag, and perhaps it is partly, but I think my piano teacher is pushing me too far, too fast. My first lesson was at the beginning of Sept 20 and now she’s got me playing one of Grieg’s Lyric Pieces (waltz).

My question is should I worry about missing out on fundamentals or should I just go for it? She says I could splash about in the shallow end for longer but there’s little she can do for me down there. She is an ABRSM ex-examiner so I presume she knows what they talking about.

Full disclosure - I did take a couple of years lessons about 40 years ago until I failed Grade 2 and have subsequently played guitar, saxophone, ukulele and did some choral singing.

If my teacher is reading this - hi!

Hi Nordwest,

Sorry, but in my opinion, complete nuts....... crazy crazy.......Years ago I had some music students too, but
my starting point was the interest of the student, a good pedagogical principle .... of course as a teacher you will act as a guiding teacher .... but this doesn't seem like your next step....Depends of course also of your interest and age, technic etc.....

Kind regards
Johan B


[Linked Image]
Kawai CA95SB (Previous:Yamaha CLP320PE & DGX620)
Motto's:
'Music is a way of living' & 'Nil volentibus arduum'
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 18
N
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
N
Joined: Jan 2021
Posts: 18
Thanks for replies - I’ve been playing this thing for a few weeks and I can get it together okay but the tempo is more adagio than presto. It sounds lovely at that speed - like a nocturne.

I do practice a lot (2-3 hours a day); but I think I’ll talk to her and tell her that at this point my goal is enjoying myself rather than progressing as fast as I can. I want to be a complete pianist rather than just be able to rattle off classical repertoire.

Once again, thanks.

Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,321
I
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,321
Pieces must not be overwhelming for a good progress. They must seem difficult but doable.

Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 4,011
Z
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Z
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 4,011
A good teacher will instil the basics whatever material you're using. They apply to all music from the simple to the advanced so if you're missing them your teacher can find the holes and fill them in.

Only if you're self-teaching will you need to include the most elementary material to avoid overwhelming yourself - and even then you may not notice the lack of fundamentals yourself because you don't know what they are or know how to get them. Josh Wright, for example, lists the right notes, rhythm, articulation, voicing and dynamics with appropriate pedalling, rubato and tempo. How you acquire these depends a lot on correct posture and ergonomic motion. The best we can do as autodidacts is to avoid wrong notes, rhythm, etc, and inappropriate pedalling, rubato and tempo.


Richard
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,487
Gold Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,487
Not a piano teacher by any means so take this with a grain of salt. Your experience is similar to mine, you have a lot of musical background, just not on piano. I’m also learning most of my fundamentals from repertoire and have been pretty much since I started (with scales and some hanon type etudes.) I’m quite pleased with my progress 4 years later

Assuming you’re playing Opus 12 No 2, I think it’s actually a reasonable piece at your level. Your musical background should make the rhythms no problem, so the triplets probably aren’t as hard as if you didn’t have that background. It’s mostly 2 note block chords and introduces some small jumps in the left hand. There isnt really any unusual fingering and it has some interesting dynamics to learn how to play. And she’s having you take it very slowly, which is appropriate. Seems very appropriate to me and is similar in nature to some of the earlier pieces I played.

Last edited by Chrispy; 01/07/21 02:58 AM.

Now learning: Debussy Clar de Lune, Mozart Sonata in C K. 545, Joplin The Chrysanthemum
Instruments: Yamaha N1X, Roland GO:PIANO, Piano de Voyage
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,135
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2,135
I do have some music background. In my school days I got into playing violin. I learned to read the treble clef reasonably well. Back in those days I had limited exposure to piano and never thought I have enough hand coordination to get into it.

Fast forward 3 decades I decided to take up piano as an adult. In the beginning, I can read through pieces with a treble clef on the top & bottom lines. Being proficient reading the bass clef took a while. I never regret all the hours of practice I put into learning my pieces on my own. The teacher came later.

Now I have a balance between playing exercise pieces for learning techniques including Hanon & Czerny Etudes, easy arrangement of Classical & Jazz pieces. After a holiday break in December, I'll be connecting with the teacher through Zoom again until the middle of the year at least.


Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai VPC-1 or Roland A88 MKII (or FP30X)?
by detektorosradio - 12/08/21 06:03 PM
Birdcage Piano Tuner needed in Virginia
by zander35 - 12/08/21 04:45 PM
Another "Which Midi Controller Should I Buy"
by cody.carrig - 12/08/21 04:05 PM
Chopin's Polonaise 26/2 and staccato duration
by Mati - 12/08/21 04:04 PM
How good is a Chickering 105 B concert grand?
by tommyhaha - 12/08/21 02:34 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics210,462
Posts3,151,652
Members103,560
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5