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#2912991 11/17/19 12:52 AM
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Hi,

Just finished cutting a solo piano album, and need advice on mastering.. had little experience with mastering in the past.. was wondering if anyone on here uses them? And if there are any free online mastering suites.

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I have some experience. Mastering a piano can be a dbl edged sword. What is your source piano, style of music and other factors.
High end eqs, compressors., limiters and reverbs are mostly used. The most important thing is to have a goal for your sound.

What program do you use for recording?

Last edited by emenelton; 11/17/19 01:13 PM.
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I used the ballad grand, sampled from Yamahas CF3S piano, via the Yamaha P125
with a low depth concert hall reverb, via a direct digital audio recording using Yamahas
"Smart Pianist" Then used "Wavepad Audio Editor" for minor post production. Style of music is mellow to soft soundtracks,

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If the source is digital, then I think you just need a normalization to make the volume of your tracks uniform. Before the normalization it could help adding a little reverb in post-production, because I think the reverbs on most digital pianos are not very good.

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Thanks for the advice.. its been said a limiter would be of use in this recording.. I'm doing the research, but would anyone care to elaborate on what limiters actually do.

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Originally Posted by magicpiano
If the source is digital, then I think you just need a normalization to make the volume of your tracks uniform.


No, that's wrong. If that's a solo piano album, then only a group normalization might be needed - one that treats the entire album as a single piece and will normalize only according to the peak of the loudest track. Imagine being at a concert, is the piano amplified for quiet pieces?

Last edited by CyberGene; 11/18/19 09:00 AM.

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Originally Posted by Pianoworldstage
Thanks for the advice.. its been said a limiter would be of use in this recording.. I'm doing the research, but would anyone care to elaborate on what limiters actually do.


A limiter turns down the volume at peaks. You set a limit, and nothing can go above that. Once the peaks have been squashed, you'll have more uniform loudness. Limiters used on music act like compressors.

If it's classical music, you don't want to use any compression or limiting at all. For other types of music, it depends on the effect you want to have. Judicious use of compression can give you a "bigger" and smoother sound.

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Originally Posted by Pianoworldstage
I used the ballad grand, sampled from Yamahas CF3S piano, via the Yamaha P125
with a low depth concert hall reverb, via a direct digital audio recording using Yamahas
"Smart Pianist" Then used "Wavepad Audio Editor" for minor post production. Style of music is mellow to soft soundtracks,


There are 2 different ways to go. One is pushing the piano up to the front of the speakers. The other is to push the sound back and give the sound a concert hall or room perspective.

The upfront way is the easiest, just take a transparent limiter and set it to clip the top 1 - 2 dbs' and you're done. The sound is what it is and that could be your best immediate 'goal'.

To push the sound back, a sophisticated mastering engineer might use an 'ALTIVERB' simulation and put the piano in any one of a number of 'real' acoustic spaces, depending on your goals.

There is a Mastering section over on Gearslutz where you could visit. Be prepared to post a sample; CJMastering, among others there, are professional and always helpful.

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Originally Posted by CyberGene
Originally Posted by magicpiano
If the source is digital, then I think you just need a normalization to make the volume of your tracks uniform.


No, that's wrong. If that's a solo piano album, then only a group normalization might be needed - one that treats the entire album as a single piece and will normalize only according to the peak of the loudest track. Imagine being at a concert, is the piano amplified for quiet pieces?

Maybe I wasn't clear enough but that's exactly what I meant (normalize all the tracks as one). wink

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^ Ahh, OK, sorry, misinterpreted it the other way.

Last edited by CyberGene; 11/18/19 03:02 PM.

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It's my understanding that a little bit of compression / limiting is used on all professional recordings, including solo classical piano. Perhaps the folks here who are saying otherwise could provide some sources, as I'd be genuinely interested to learn more about this.


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Correct ... except for "a little bit". Substitute "a lot".
Originally Posted by TheophilusCarter
It's my understanding that a little bit of compression / limiting is used on all professional recordings, including solo classical piano. Perhaps the folks here who are saying otherwise could provide some sources, as I'd be genuinely interested to learn more about this.
Recorded music these days has very little dynamic range. If there had been recorded music three centuries ago Cristofori would have had no reason to invent the piano.

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I always crank up the volume for Moonlight Sonata Movement 1.

Anyone else do this? I definitely feel bad about it.

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Originally Posted by TheophilusCarter
It's my understanding that a little bit of compression / limiting is used on all professional recordings, including solo classical piano. Perhaps the folks here who are saying otherwise could provide some sources, as I'd be genuinely interested to learn more about this.


It's my job.


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