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Originally Posted by Terry Michael
Falling in love with pieces when I was young was a disaster. If I have one piece of advice to give beginners is TRY (real hard) to resist pieces your just not technically ready for. I can play those pieces now because I’ve come a long way in technique but honestly trying (and I mean for months!) when I was younger and having problems because I just didn’t have the chops has tarnished them a bit.

I fell in love with several pieces that were way beyond my technique when I was a kid - I mean, way, way beyond.

Like Fantasie-Impromptu, 'Heroic' Polonaise and Rondo capriccioso.....even Rach 3 grin - when I was at Grade 5.

Of course, I got hold of the scores (easy then, because the school music library was easily accessible to all music students) and tried to play through the music. It was a lot of fun, but I knew my limits and would keep putting them away, then try to tackle them again in a few months. And so on.......until my technique caught up with my aspirations. I'm talking years.

Absence makes the heart grow fonder, as Socrates once said. grin(Or maybe Sextus Propertius).


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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Originally Posted by Terry Michael
Falling in love with pieces when I was young was a disaster. If I have one piece of advice to give beginners is TRY (real hard) to resist pieces your just not technically ready for. I can play those pieces now because I’ve come a long way in technique but honestly trying (and I mean for months!) when I was younger and having problems because I just didn’t have the chops has tarnished them a bit.

I'm just glad I had a sensible teacher who didn't allow me to get ahead of myself. These days I simply love the music too much to want to butcher it with my inferior technique, and so I, to stay within the metaphor, sigh and long for my love from afar like a medieval minstrel for his highborn lady wink


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Originally Posted by Sibylle
These days I simply love the music too much to want to butcher it with my inferior technique, and so I, to stay within the metaphor, sigh and long for my love from afar like a medieval minstrel for his highborn lady wink


This pretty much describes my relationship with Mendelssohn's Rondo Capriccioso smile

I do fall in love with pieces of music a lot and these pieces come from various (classical) styles and periods. I was going to post and say I was promiscuous as far as music is concerned, but I like "polyamorous" better smile

As for pieces I could actually play and also fell in love with, relatively recent infatuations include Schumann's "Arabesque," Mendelssohn's "Venetian Gondola Song" (Op. 30 no. 6), Tchaikovsky's "October", and Ginastera's "Danzas Argentinas," especially #2 (I've only played the first two, the third dance looks too hard for me). Haydn's sonata in E minor (34) comes pretty close.

I'm also in love with Chopin's "Nocturne" op. 9 no 2 and am planning to learn it next year. I'm also eyeing the third movement of Beethoven's "Tempest," but we'll see... This one might remain unrequited love.

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And how could I forget Scarlatti's sonata in F minor (K466) and Chopin's Waltz, op. 69 no. 1?!!

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Nah! I'm too hard-hearted to fall in love!

Cheers!


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“Of all the gin joints, in all the towns in the world, the D minor Rachmaninoff Sonata walks into mine.”


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To some exceptions, most of the pieces I love are not piano pieces, a lot of vocal, polyphonic, quartet, Quintet, ensemble; In fact I do not make any particular connection between loving a piece of music and my desire to play it at the piano, it is the contrary. Practising a piece makes it a sort of object of performance and I am getting emotionally detach from it. So I prefer studying the pieces I love and avoid playing them - I'd rather listen to a good recording or a live performance, so I enjoy the music much more than playing it myself.

I tend to choose pieces to play because they present a particular technical, historical or interpretative interest; except some atonal music for which I really feel little interest like Microkosmos, I do not mind playing just about any type of music.

There are pieces like Bach's fugues which I love studying and playing but not really listening to, I guess I find them more interesting architecturally than musically. And there are also old pieces that are rarely or not at all recorded at the piano , the English Virginalists, Sweelinck, Frescobaldi, Froberger so I play them for myself or the few of my friends who can stand this type of music.

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Originally Posted by Sidokar


There are pieces like Bach's fugues which I love studying and playing but not really listening to, I guess I find them more interesting architecturally than musically.


I know what you mean, I also love playing Bach's fugues (more so than the preludes) but I wouldn't say I'm in love with them.

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Recently, Ravel's Jeux d'eau. My teacher thinks it's all color and bright shiny objects. I think it is profound. The big sequence paragraphs, the glorious coloristic figurations combined with the harmonies that they encapsulate, etc. OK, I'm most entranced by the big passage in the middle (you all know what I'm talking about) and I don't like the ending. But . . . I'm in love with it. Here's one reason why (and it has nothing to do with the artist).


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Originally Posted by SiFi
....I don't like the ending....

In such a situation, I see the task as being to find a way to see it and play it that you will (not just like but) love.

I wouldn't say that if it were a piece by, say, Joe Doe. ha
But it it's Jeux d'eau, by a composer like Ravel, I'd figure that if....
-- if I love the composer, and
-- if I love the (rest of the) piece, and
-- if I suspect that he knew what he was doing
-- including that he wouldn't end the piece with something less great than the rest of the piece
-- and if I'm not liking it.....

It means I haven't discovered what he was going for, what he 'meant' -- and I have to look and think some more.

And I'd try not to worry about or be bound by how anybody or everybody else plays it.

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Man I love the ending of that piece.

Mark gives good advice though.


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Agree with SiFi that Ravel's Jeux d'eau is bewitching (and although Lindsay is way more fetching, Richter's performance really does it to me!). Unfortunately (or fortunately??), if a composition has had a great deal of exposure, I'm less likely to develop a serious crush. It has to be melodic (at least have some melodic bones), and be rather different from the pack. I'm working on my "first" Balakirev (courtesy of SiFi's inspiration), a Waltz. I've avoided the Carmenish siren Islamey, not the least because I've discovered among the hazy hagiographies that Scriabin sprained his hand practicing it (and eventually recovered), and while poor Moszkowski was (allegedly) performing it, something snapped ("a neurological disorder in his arm") and from that he day was never able to perform again. Talk about a heart(arm)breaker!!

Rubinstein said that when he was performing he would pick the prettiest girl in the audience and play to her. Recalling SiFi's "have you ever been in the moment" thread, since my youth I haven't had a piece well enough in hand not to be mentally wincing blind and thinking "Don't screw up! Don't screw up!".... not looking for love(s). (Besides, I've got a (really nice) gal).

(Please grant me a Me-To-insensitivity dispensation: I'm old).


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Unfortunately, I do tend to fall in love a lot. I say unfortunately because sometimes it requires a lot of discipline to not get side-tracked by all my future would-be projects. Right now I'm working on a Beethoven sonata and trying to polish 3 Chopin etudes and a nocturne, and while I enjoy working on every single piece I'm working on right now, I need to resist the temptation to work on other things like Ravel's Jeux d'eau or Liszt's au bord d'une source. I think -deep down- that soon I won't be able to resist that temptation any longer smile

If anyone is not familiar with Liszt's au bord d'une source, please go listen to horrowitz or andre Leplante play it right now!

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Originally Posted by dumka1
...
I'm also in love with Chopin's "Nocturne" op. 9 no 2 and am planning to learn it next year. I'm also eyeing the third movement of Beethoven's "Tempest," but we'll see... This one might remain unrequited love.

My favourite movement of my favourite sonata grin We really do have similar taste!

What do you think of Chopin's Nocturne op. 27 no 2? That's my all-time favourite.


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Originally Posted by BruceD
Nah! I'm too hard-hearted to fall in love!

I don't believe that for one second! grin Go on, spill!

Jeux d'eau is wonderful. One of those pieces that never get old.


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Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by dumka1
...
I'm also in love with Chopin's "Nocturne" op. 9 no 2 and am planning to learn it next year. I'm also eyeing the third movement of Beethoven's "Tempest," but we'll see... This one might remain unrequited love.

My favourite movement of my favourite sonata grin We really do have similar taste!

What do you think of Chopin's Nocturne op. 27 no 2? That's my all-time favourite.


It's a lovely Nocturne, but, now that I started listening to classical music more regularly (since resuming my piano lessons about 4 years ago), I realize, with some embarrassment, that I tend to prefer more melody-driven pieces than more "abstract," dreamy, mood-creating pieces. Not so much in terms of listening to, I guess, as in terms of what I'd like to learn myself, given my limited time for practice. I played Chopin's Nocturne op. 72 no. 1, for example, and I liked it a lot but never fell in love with it. This is probably why I can't fully fall in love with most Impressionist pieces, even though I appreciate them a great deal. But this might change in the future.

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But but but! It's the melody that has me so enchanted. It took me several listens though, before no. 2 began to "stick" in my head, maybe it'll still happen to you one day smile


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Originally Posted by Sibylle
But but but! It's the melody that has me so enchanted. It took me several listens though, before no. 2 began to "stick" in my head, maybe it'll still happen to you one day smile


Yes, I know. There were moments in it that gave me goosebumps. 72.1 has a beautiful melody, too, but it's less obvious than what I prefer. But yes, one doesn't have to fall in love necessarily at first sight (=listen). smile

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Originally Posted by Sibylle
But but but! It's the melody that has me so enchanted. It took me several listens though, before no. 2 began to "stick" in my head, maybe it'll still happen to you one day smile


+1. It is the melody for me as well.



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