2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
68 members (btcomm, andriven, bobrunyan, Bostonmoores, accordeur, brdwyguy, 14 invisible), 1,247 guests, and 497 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 16
A
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
A
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 16
I'm learning Bach's 2-part invention BWV 772 using the Henle Urtext edition. I'm OK with my progress over the last five weeks and I'm at the point of working to improve my mordents and phrasing. I was surprised to discover today that without realizing when or how I switched the fingering of the mordent over C5 in measure 5 from 534 to 524. My brain probably found 534 unnatural for a beginner? Now I'm struggling to get back to 534 without stumbling. I also tend to hit my pinky on the side of the D5 key.

To all of you who have learned this Invention, what fingering do you use for the measure 5 mordent? I have a lot of confidence in Urtext as the authoritative version and I suppose I need to strengthen and learn 534 finger control anyway, so should I keep at it to return to the correct fingering? I'm a little shocked that somehow I switched fingering so carelessly.

Here's a screenshot of the measure I'm referencing:
[Linked Image]

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 2,092
M
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 2,092
524 I found very bizarre. I personally would just do 434. That is very easy. I can play 534. It is harder. I suspect it is for musicality reasons not for easiness reasons but will see what others think.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,930
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,930
Originally Posted by AdagioLearner

I have a lot of confidence in Urtext as the authoritative version and I suppose I need to strengthen and learn 534 finger control anyway, so should I keep at it to return to the correct fingering?

Why do you think 534 is the "correct fingering"? It isn't Bach's. He didn't write any.

Actually, I'm surprised that an Urtext edition has been edited this way, but I suppose 'Urtext' is in the eyes of the beholder - or editor.......

Use whatever fingering you find easiest and can play cleanly. I find 534 quite easy, but 423 or 424 or 434 or 323 (if you have big hands) are all feasible. Actually, I find your 524 quite awkward, but hey, we're all different.

P.S. I believe your 'Urtext' edition has fingerings by one Victor Shevtsov.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
At the risk of starting a war, I would say any fingering. I use 323 to match the phrasing of the other segments that use the same pattern. The point is that the two notes preceding the mordant are usually played detaché, making the choice of fingering the mordant moot.

Joined: May 2018
Posts: 346
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 346
Urtext doesn't forbid fingerings.
But fingerings are always a suggestion, not a sole and only way to do it. smile


My piano journey from day 1
Started piano on February 2016.
Pieces I'm working on :
- Rameau, Les Sauvages
- Mozart, K545, 1st mov
- Chopin, nocturne op. posth. in C# minor
- Debussy, Golliwog's cakewalk
- Pozzoli, E.R. 427, etude no. 6
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,422
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,422
It's funny that you mention urtext with respect to this invention because there are in fact two different versions of it, both of which are urtext. Bach originally wrote this invention as most people know it using sixteenth notes and then later revised it to use a triplet motif.

Conventional sixteenth-note motif:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=iHNxdOTFt7c

Triplet motif:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=31r5ZgWeC0o

So much for "urtext". wink

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 30,976
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 30,976
Originally Posted by Moo :)
I can play 534. It is harder. I suspect it is for musicality reasons not for easiness reasons but will see what others think.
On mordents or trills(2313etc.) some people find changing fingers technically easier.

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
It's funny that you mention urtext with respect to this invention because there are in fact two different versions of it, both of which are urtext. Bach originally wrote this invention as most people know it using sixteenth notes and then later revised it to use a triplet motif.

Conventional sixteenth-note motif:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=iHNxdOTFt7c

Triplet motif:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=31r5ZgWeC0o

So much for "urtext". wink
Actually, you are missing information about Bach’s reason for writing these inventions. I just taught a class at university this January on the subjet (among others).

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play. He said to vary the rhythms, the notes, the harmonies, the counterpoint, whatever, as practice in improvisation. His students made copious notes of his suggestions and these ‘copies’ of the inventions have made their way into the supposed ‘urtext’ publications.

Bach would laugh at the seriousness we take in playing ‘every note as written’, as if it were the infallable ‘word’ of a god.

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,487
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,487
Originally Posted by prout
At the risk of starting a war, I would say any fingering. I use 323 to match the phrasing of the other segments that use the same pattern. The point is that the two notes preceding the mordant are usually played detaché, making the choice of fingering the mordant moot.


I was told the same thing-use any fingering that works for you. Makes sense since everyone's hand size, finger dexterity and reach are different.



[Linked Image]
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,032
E
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,032

I used 323, but fingering is always just a suggestion. There will sometimes be an optimal fingering but others where there are several solutions to the same problem.

Last edited by earlofmar; 07/21/18 09:48 PM.

Surprisingly easy, barely an inconvenience.

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 16
A
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
A
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 16
Thank you everyone for the very thoughtful responses and the encouragement to make my own choices. This is my first foray into Bach's piano music. It is true I am experiencing reverence and an awed appreciation for this great architect of sound. The beautiful construction of the Inventions seems to invite precision. But I need to remember I'm a part of the player/composer equation and should feel more comfortable with my choices. I hope that will come with experience.

BTW I have an excellent teacher but we are both taking summer vacations so it was great to get feedback from this forum.

Prout: I would love to take a university class on Bach. Can you recommend a good biography or analysis of Bach for a summer read?

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
O
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
Originally Posted by prout

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play.


Would you mind referring to a credible source for this story? Not that I don't trust you but there are so many "urban legends" about composers that I like to check. Knowing something about the education culture at the time I find it a bit suspicious that the students would dare to complain...

You are right when it comes to the importance of detailed notation, it was very different back then. The reason I prefer urtext is simply because it's easier to read, all the extra edited stuff bothers me and the added fingerings are always wrong for me.

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play.


Would you mind referring to a credible source for this story? Not that I don't trust you but there are so many "urban legends" about composers that I like to check. Knowing something about the education culture at the time I find it a bit suspicious that the students would dare to complain...

You are right when it comes to the importance of detailed notation, it was very different back then. The reason I prefer urtext is simply because it's easier to read, all the extra edited stuff bothers me and the added fingerings are always wrong for me.
Well, most of his students were his sons or his wives. grin

The ‘Bach Schule’ is well referenced and can be traced back directly to J.S. through his sons C.P.E. and W.F.

Here is the frontispiece of J.S. Bach’s publication of his two and three part inventions:

HONEST METHOD
by which amateurs of the clavichord - especially, however, those desirous of learning - are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligato parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style of playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition.
The handiwork of
JOH. SEB. BACH,
Chapel Master to His Serene Highness,
the Prince of Anhalt-Cöthen
The year of our Lord 1723


Right from the horse’s mouth.

Needless to say, the same instructions and hopes contained on Bach’s frontispiece apply equally to the piano since, while the piano is not as expressive as the clavichord - you can’t do vibrato or portamenti on a piano - it is capable of catabile sound in the hands of a musician.

For further sources of the Bach Schule read ‘Versace über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen, H.868, 870 (Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel)’ -
“Essay on the true art of playing the keyboard”.

It is available in German on IMSLP and English elsewhere. It provides detailed tables on ornamentation and fingering and so on.

I should add that the essential element of J.S. Bach’s keyboard technique, contrary to most other keyboardists at the time (all harpsichordists), is the use of arm weight. This is necessary when playing the clavichord, but not required when playing the harpsichord.

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
Above all, I should remark that ‘Cantabile style of playing’ DOES NOT mean ‘Legato playing’. It means playing the notes cleanly and with articulation and phrasing much as a violinist and singer would use. There is much air in Bach’s music.

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 757
L
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 757

@prout,
thank you very much for your posts.

One similar thing, which is on my mind for a long time now, concerning fingering and phrasing, in regard to
Alfred Kreutz, who was the editor of the Schott version of the Inventions, especially an early print .of
Edition Schott 01092 "Zweistimmige Inventionen". Kind of the opposite to Henle's Urtext edition without fingering.

I am repeatedly puzzled by the fingering given by Mr. Kreutz, who for sure was a verz skillful organist and pianist,
which only make sense to me in hindsight, with respect to his specific phrasing and probably to simplyfy memorisation.
At least on the internet, I could not find any explanations or criticism on Alfred Kreutz' editing.

The current edtion by Schott, as far as I can see from the previews on their internet site,
the vertical phrasing markers and some staccato are removed, but the fingering seems to be the same.

What would be your opinion on this?



@outo,
There are also "bernhard's" posts on pianostreet as a "referernce", in addtion to most of the scientific literature on JSB. wink

e.g.
http://pianoforum.net/smf/index.php/topic,2714.msg23310.html#msg23310
(how to teach/learn a piece form scratch using as example J. S. Bach’s invention no. 1)

here a long link list compiled by "berhard" himself:
https://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=5767.msg56133#msg56133


happy debating...

Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 69
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 69
I am working on this piece too. I think I use 2-3-2 for the mordent you are showing. But the important thing may be what comes before and after the mordent- what works for your particular reach and comfort? And what is most comfortable to play the mordent effectively? I have changed fingerings for some others so that they sound good to me and so I can go on to the next notes easily-that's the bottom line for me. I love the 2nd, ornamented version of this piece, by the way-I'm playing that one with great pleasure after hearing Andras Schiff's wonderful version on Youtube, as cited above. Of course his ornamentation is perfection, and much more complex that what I can play at present. A worthy goal however. Note- that version requires 2 against 3 in places.....I wish we could see him play this.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=31r5ZgWeC0o

You CAN watch this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHNxdOTFt7c

And if you click on the little wheel at the right bottom of the video, in the drop down you can run it at half speed or 75 % to see what fingerings are used. Sounds weird, but perhaps useful.

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
O
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
Originally Posted by prout
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play.


Would you mind referring to a credible source for this story? Not that I don't trust you but there are so many "urban legends" about composers that I like to check. Knowing something about the education culture at the time I find it a bit suspicious that the students would dare to complain...

You are right when it comes to the importance of detailed notation, it was very different back then. The reason I prefer urtext is simply because it's easier to read, all the extra edited stuff bothers me and the added fingerings are always wrong for me.
Well, most of his students were his sons or his wives. grin

The ‘Bach Schule’ is well referenced and can be traced back directly to J.S. through his sons C.P.E. and W.F.

Here is the frontispiece of J.S. Bach’s publication of his two and three part inventions:

HONEST METHOD
by which amateurs of the clavichord - especially, however, those desirous of learning - are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligato parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style of playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition.
The handiwork of
JOH. SEB. BACH,
Chapel Master to His Serene Highness,
the Prince of Anhalt-Cöthen
The year of our Lord 1723


Right from the horse’s mouth.

Needless to say, the same instructions and hopes contained on Bach’s frontispiece apply equally to the piano since, while the piano is not as expressive as the clavichord - you can’t do vibrato or portamenti on a piano - it is capable of catabile sound in the hands of a musician.

For further sources of the Bach Schule read ‘Versace über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen, H.868, 870 (Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel)’ -
“Essay on the true art of playing the keyboard”.

It is available in German on IMSLP and English elsewhere. It provides detailed tables on ornamentation and fingering and so on.

I should add that the essential element of J.S. Bach’s keyboard technique, contrary to most other keyboardists at the time (all harpsichordists), is the use of arm weight. This is necessary when playing the clavichord, but not required when playing the harpsichord.



All good reading but not really an answer to my question... not that it was very important for the grand scheme smile

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play.


Would you mind referring to a credible source for this story? Not that I don't trust you but there are so many "urban legends" about composers that I like to check. Knowing something about the education culture at the time I find it a bit suspicious that the students would dare to complain...

You are right when it comes to the importance of detailed notation, it was very different back then. The reason I prefer urtext is simply because it's easier to read, all the extra edited stuff bothers me and the added fingerings are always wrong for me.
Well, most of his students were his sons or his wives. grin

The ‘Bach Schule’ is well referenced and can be traced back directly to J.S. through his sons C.P.E. and W.F.

Here is the frontispiece of J.S. Bach’s publication of his two and three part inventions:

HONEST METHOD
by which amateurs of the clavichord - especially, however, those desirous of learning - are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligato parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style of playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition.
The handiwork of
JOH. SEB. BACH,
Chapel Master to His Serene Highness,
the Prince of Anhalt-Cöthen
The year of our Lord 1723


Right from the horse’s mouth.

Needless to say, the same instructions and hopes contained on Bach’s frontispiece apply equally to the piano since, while the piano is not as expressive as the clavichord - you can’t do vibrato or portamenti on a piano - it is capable of catabile sound in the hands of a musician.

For further sources of the Bach Schule read ‘Versace über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen, H.868, 870 (Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel)’ -
“Essay on the true art of playing the keyboard”.

It is available in German on IMSLP and English elsewhere. It provides detailed tables on ornamentation and fingering and so on.

I should add that the essential element of J.S. Bach’s keyboard technique, contrary to most other keyboardists at the time (all harpsichordists), is the use of arm weight. This is necessary when playing the clavichord, but not required when playing the harpsichord.



All good reading but not really an answer to my question... not that it was very important for the grand scheme smile


I refer you to Johann Nikolaus Forkel, Bach’s first biographer. Good reading and some discussion on the tedious drilling and dis-hearted students Bach fostered, which led him to produce his ‘inventios’.

Like Bach, who believed in self-teaching, I encourage you to find this info out for yourself, rather than have me feed it to you line-by-line. I have always found it much more satisfying to re-invent the wheel, because then I know why it works.

Cheers

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
P
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,468
Originally Posted by lophiomys

@prout,
thank you very much for your posts.

One similar thing, which is on my mind for a long time now, concerning fingering and phrasing, in regard to
Alfred Kreutz, who was the editor of the Schott version of the Inventions, especially an early print .of
Edition Schott 01092 "Zweistimmige Inventionen". Kind of the opposite to Henle's Urtext edition without fingering.

I am repeatedly puzzled by the fingering given by Mr. Kreutz, who for sure was a verz skillful organist and pianist,
which only make sense to me in hindsight, with respect to his specific phrasing and probably to simplyfy memorisation.
At least on the internet, I could not find any explanations or criticism on Alfred Kreutz' editing.

The current edtion by Schott, as far as I can see from the previews on their internet site,
the vertical phrasing markers and some staccato are removed, but the fingering seems to be the same.

What would be your opinion on this?
I am unfamiliar with Mr. Kreutz’s fingerings. I justed looked at his WTC 1 edition, and it appears his fingerings are biased for legato playing, a feature not common in pre-baroque and baroque keyboard playing.

Players at that time would cross long fingers past each other and use the same finger for contiguous notes (Chopin did this as well), for example.

Here are a few quotes from contemporaneous sources:

‘the finger which has just played should be lifted before the next one plays’ (Santa María, 1565)
‘never to apply the next finger until he has lifted the previous one’ (Mattheson, 1735)
‘ordinary procedure is to lift the finger from the preceding key very quickly just before touching the following note (Marpung, 1755)
‘without a little silence at the end of each note, organ music would be like an inarticulate series of vowels without consonants (Dom Bédos, 1778)

This is in clear contrast to Carl Czerny who stated ‘The common legato...must be employed in all cases where the author has not indicated any particular expression.’

These statements, of course, should never be taken as absolute rules. Treatises abounded in those days on performance technique. Clarity, finesse, phrasing, line, arc of emotion are all held dear to the musician. One should remember that the human voice (and the voices of other animals) formed the basis of our first music. Nivers (1665) said that the keyboard player should mark all notes distinctly and yet slur some of them, as a singer would do.

Forkel (1802) remarks that J.S. Bach, by taking the ‘middle path’ between legato and and staccato, had achieved ‘the highest degree of clarity in the playing of single notes as in the pronunciation of single words.’

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
O
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,765
Originally Posted by prout
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by prout

In a nutshell, Bach originally wrote excercises to teach keyboard. They were basically five note scales up and down. His students complained that the excercises were boring, so Bach fleshed them out into the two and three part inventions. He was very clear that what he had written were suggestions only as to what notes to play.


Would you mind referring to a credible source for this story? Not that I don't trust you but there are so many "urban legends" about composers that I like to check. Knowing something about the education culture at the time I find it a bit suspicious that the students would dare to complain...

You are right when it comes to the importance of detailed notation, it was very different back then. The reason I prefer urtext is simply because it's easier to read, all the extra edited stuff bothers me and the added fingerings are always wrong for me.
Well, most of his students were his sons or his wives. grin

The ‘Bach Schule’ is well referenced and can be traced back directly to J.S. through his sons C.P.E. and W.F.

Here is the frontispiece of J.S. Bach’s publication of his two and three part inventions:

HONEST METHOD
by which amateurs of the clavichord - especially, however, those desirous of learning - are shown a clear way not only (1) to learn to play cleanly in two parts, but also, after further progress, (2) to handle three obligato parts correctly and well; and along with this not only to obtain good inventions (ideas) but to develop the same well; above all, however, to achieve a cantabile style of playing and at the same time acquire a strong foretaste of composition.
The handiwork of
JOH. SEB. BACH,
Chapel Master to His Serene Highness,
the Prince of Anhalt-Cöthen
The year of our Lord 1723


Right from the horse’s mouth.

Needless to say, the same instructions and hopes contained on Bach’s frontispiece apply equally to the piano since, while the piano is not as expressive as the clavichord - you can’t do vibrato or portamenti on a piano - it is capable of catabile sound in the hands of a musician.

For further sources of the Bach Schule read ‘Versace über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen, H.868, 870 (Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel)’ -
“Essay on the true art of playing the keyboard”.

It is available in German on IMSLP and English elsewhere. It provides detailed tables on ornamentation and fingering and so on.

I should add that the essential element of J.S. Bach’s keyboard technique, contrary to most other keyboardists at the time (all harpsichordists), is the use of arm weight. This is necessary when playing the clavichord, but not required when playing the harpsichord.



All good reading but not really an answer to my question... not that it was very important for the grand scheme smile


I refer you to Johann Nikolaus Forkel, Bach’s first biographer. Good reading and some discussion on the tedious drilling and dis-hearted students Bach fostered, which led him to produce his ‘inventios’.

Like Bach, who believed in self-teaching, I encourage you to find this info out for yourself, rather than have me feed it to you line-by-line. I have always found it much more satisfying to re-invent the wheel, because then I know why it works.

Cheers


Don't think I'm interested enough to dig myself...could be true or could be a story invented to spice things up a bit wink

I've read on the music schooling of those days and seems the boys destined for a musical career were often treated more like slaves...boredom probably wasn't the worst of their problems...

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
Our Fall 2021 Free Newsletter is Out , see it here!
---------------------
Selling my Hammond & Leslie!
---------------------
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Effect of volume on experience of action
by op299 - 10/17/21 04:35 AM
A la recherche du Pete14 perdu
by Fleer - 10/16/21 11:57 PM
Jazz piano chord progression Mary did you know
by Nicepianoman39 - 10/16/21 10:17 PM
Climate Change & Boom
by Xam - 10/16/21 08:18 PM
Upright Piano Decisions… - Boston vs Schimmel
by Pianofly - 10/16/21 08:16 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics209,627
Posts3,140,257
Members103,028
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5