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Wondering about the Privia series...
I just got a PX560 and see it has "light", "normal" and "heavy." Just from a few minutes of playing, heavy takes way too much force. Normal seems OK, but still feels off compared to my real grand piano. The light setting seems to be the most sensitive.

I'm kind of leaning toward light, but was wondering what the rest of you like. Not sure how important it'll be anyway, as I plan to use the instrument for all the other sounds besides piano. I will probably never use the grand piano sounds unless I'm in the mood for a different flavor.


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Hi, Radio.Octave! I used my PX150 for few years and finaly came to "Heavy touch". After using medium curve for a while I noticed some problems with transfering on acoustic pianos with heavy keys. Firstly the third level seemed heavy for me too, but after few days - a week, I used to it. So I recommend to those, who plan to have piano trainings on DP, not to use "light curve". It's harder to control piano sound and harder to transfer to some AP's. And using "Heavy touch" you'll have no problems with most of them (light or heavy). Also it develops your physical strength and endurance. If you are not able to cope with the third level, try medium curve.
But if you don't plan to use it as a piano trainer, you can afford light touch to yourself, transforming your DP into some sort of synthesizer or a workstation.

Last edited by Kridlatec; 08/04/16 01:54 AM.

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Do you have the volume turned all the way up?

If not, do that first.

Then, see how "normal" and "heavy" feel.

I run my px-350 on "heavy".



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If you change the settings from light to heavy, it also softens the tone, making it quieter. So you can wack up the vol, and get a more mellow sound without it actually being heavier to play.
The weight required to operate the keys cannot vary but the internals can vary the response you get.
So, the soft setting which you indicate is similar to that on your grand might also indicate your grand has a bright dynamic sound.


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Originally Posted by Charles Cohen
Do you have the volume turned all the way up?

If not, do that first.

Then, see how "normal" and "heavy" feel.

I run my px-350 on "heavy".



I have it at about 3/4 volume now. I'll try adjusting that.


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Originally Posted by peterws
If you change the settings from light to heavy, it also softens the tone, making it quieter. So you can wack up the vol, and get a more mellow sound without it actually being heavier to play.
The weight required to operate the keys cannot vary but the internals can vary the response you get.
So, the soft setting which you indicate is similar to that on your grand might also indicate your grand has a bright dynamic sound.


Just comparing to what I'm used to on my piano, heavy doesn't feel sensitive enough. If I want at maximum intensity on the casio with that settings, I really have to pound it. So far, the light setting seems to make the keyboard most sensitive. Playing max. intensity doesn't require me to pound the keys. I'll have to experiment a bit more. I kind of wish there was a setting between light and normal.

I'd say my acoustic is pretty mellow. It's a Kawai grand, so if you've ever heard any Kawais, it's close to their usual warm, mellow sound. I've had it voiced down a bit, so it's even mellower.


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Originally Posted by Kridlatec
Hi, Radio.Octave! I used my PX150 for few years and finaly came to "Heavy touch". After using medium curve for a while I noticed some problems with transfering on acoustic pianos with heavy keys. Firstly the third level seemed heavy for me too, but after few days - a week, I used to it. So I recommend to those, who plan to have piano trainings on DP, not to use "light curve". It's harder to control piano sound and harder to transfer to some AP's. And using "Heavy touch" you'll have no problems with most of them (light or heavy). Also it develops your physical strength and endurance. If you are not able to cope with the third level, try medium curve.
But if you don't plan to use it as a piano trainer, you can afford light touch to yourself, transforming your DP into some sort of synthesizer or a workstation.


What you say about "harder to control piano sound" is what I'm seeing. It seems like the light setting makes the casio hardest to control. It's very sensitive and I have to watch myself not to play too hard. In a way, I think that might be good though because I have to be more deliberate in my playing. At any rate, I see myself using it 95% as a synth and not as a piano trainer, so it's probably not a huge deal. It seems a lighter touch is better for synth stuff anyway?


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Originally Posted by Radio.Octave
Originally Posted by peterws
If you change the settings from light to heavy, it also softens the tone, making it quieter. So you can wack up the vol, and get a more mellow sound without it actually being heavier to play.
The weight required to operate the keys cannot vary but the internals can vary the response you get.
So, the soft setting which you indicate is similar to that on your grand might also indicate your grand has a bright dynamic sound.


Just comparing to what I'm used to on my piano, heavy doesn't feel sensitive enough. If I want at maximum intensity on the casio with that settings, I really have to pound it. So far, the light setting seems to make the keyboard most sensitive. Playing max. intensity doesn't require me to pound the keys. I'll have to experiment a bit more. I kind of wish there was a setting between light and normal.

I'd say my acoustic is pretty mellow. It's a Kawai grand, so if you've ever heard any Kawais, it's close to their usual warm, mellow sound. I've had it voiced down a bit, so it's even mellower.


Guess I shouldve missed out the word "bright" . . . smile


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Originally Posted by Radio.Octave


What you say about "harder to control piano sound" is what I'm seeing. It seems like the light setting makes the casio hardest to control. It's very sensitive and I have to watch myself not to play too hard. In a way, I think that might be good though because I have to be more deliberate in my playing....


For now this is exactly why I'm practicing with Light; to force me to focus on getting bettter playing softer. It was around the 18 month point from beginning lessons where I started to recognize my playing overall tends to be too loud.... probably not unusual for beginners. Upon trying the heavy setting it occured to me that yes, this generally quiets the sound by having the computer get rid of it IE. does not address the underlying problem of me regularly imparting too much force on the keys. Setting to Lighter or Light / Light+ ( on a Roland and also a Kawai but is the same basic effect/feature as on your Casio) it has taken a while but if i really focus on attack force ( it also helps if I slow down) Ive gotten better at playing softly/piano .... along the way I've also learned that if I slightly depress the keys to just before the letoff point, and then attack, I can reliably produce pp/pianisimo, something I had previously struggled with since beginning. After practicing this a while, upon setting Touch back to normal, now I can reliably produce ppp.

Also, other comments in this thread indicates that tweaking Touch setting does not actually alter the key weighting, so thanks for this! Ive read a lot of threads here in which Touch tweaking is discussed and some of the comments suggest that Touch setting does what it does by raising/lowering key weight and that notion had been confusing to me.



Last edited by drewrst; 08/04/16 05:49 PM.

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Can I hear more opinions about this please?

I thought light-touch sensitivity would be do wrong doing when I first purchased my piano and have been playing that way.

But now that I tried light sensitivity it makes the instrument harder to control. Which one translates to an average grand sized piano better?

I mean in light sensitivity the piano sound gets too bright too soon. On the other hand in heavy touch settings it seems to stay mostly on the mellow side of things. I'm baffled by this as I've never played a grand before and don't know which one I should train myself with.

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Any Casio users? This has been eating me lately.

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I've played a bit recently on a PX150 and a PX350M, as far as I can tell they share the same action.

The Casios IMO have the lightest hammer-action short of something like a Williams keyboard. Don't get me wrong, I actually like the Casio action, but IMO it's pretty far from an acoustic piano, at least the grands I've played.

I have NOT tried adjusting the touch sensitivity, but if I owned a Casio, I would almost certainly default to heavy. After developing opinions of the various Roland/Yamaha/Kawai/Korg actions I've been playing, I finally got some serious time behind a couple of Bosendorfer and Yamaha grands, and both are IMO heavier than any digital action I've tried...there are differences with the static and dynamic/inertial weight for sure, but in terms of playing duration and fatigue, I find the APs wear out my fingers sooner than any of the DPs. So budget actions like Casio and Yamaha GHS feel way too light to be "realistic" imo.


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Kaanguner,
there are various reasons why a peron might want to tinker with the touch response setting BUT the basic purpose, regardless of brand, is to provide the player with a way to adjust their playing force style so that they can more consistently produce dynamics that match the score of music they play. Some people tend to be heavy handed - I am one - and setting this parameter to "heavy" will lighten up the resultant sound. Perhaps other people are the opposite and usually play by not exerting a lot of force on the keys, so they may want to use the light setting. I do not think this parameter is for making the DP sound more or less like an AP. It really depends on your ears and how much force you exert in your typical keystrokes.

Are you taking lessons or regularly practicing by playing with sheet music? What kind of results do you usually get - too quiet, to loud, or just right? Do you find that you are able to usually produce the dynamics, as written in the music, with the setting at normal, or light or heavy?


Last edited by drewr; 12/08/16 08:53 PM.

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I also run my PX-350 on "Heavy" touch. I found that gives me a good range of MIDI velocities (about 13 to about 117), without pounding, or needing too-light-to-be-consistent "ppp" playing.

I learned as a kid on a baby grand, and the "heavy" touch matches pretty well to what I remember. But I haven't played any grand pianos recently, except:

. . . One Yamaha, at an old-age home, that was _really_ heavy, compared to the PX-350 and my teacher's
. . . acoustic upright.

I wasn't prepared for that, but it worked out OK.



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Main problems with my current settings:

The uprights that I have tried seems to get too bright too soon compared to HEAVY settings at PX-150. They felt like my Casio settings were a bit too much for the real thing. As in X amount of force would get 35velocity on PX150 but 55 on an upright.

Another problem I have with Heavy settings is I can't reproduce max amount of velocity consistently. As in when I bash my keyboard I get up to 115-120 and can't hit the 127 velocity mark. Plus there are the issues with other notes in the chord. I mean if I bang a 6 notes chord with both of my hands the loudest two notes would be 115-120 at heavy settings but other four would hover around 70-80 where as in Light settings it'd be around 100 with loudests being 127 at max. Which seemed more consistent to me.

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Originally Posted by drewr
Kaanguner,
there are various reasons why a peron might want to tinker with the touch response setting BUT the basic purpose, regardless of brand, is to provide the player with a way to adjust their playing force style so that they can more consistently produce dynamics that match the score of music they play. Some people tend to be heavy handed - I am one - and setting this parameter to "heavy" will lighten up the resultant sound. Perhaps other people are the opposite and usually play by not exerting a lot of force on the keys, so they may want to use the light setting. I do not think this parameter is for making the DP sound more or less like an AP. It really depends on your ears and how much force you exert in your typical keystrokes.

Are you taking lessons or regularly practicing by playing with sheet music? What kind of results do you usually get - too quiet, to loud, or just right? Do you find that you are able to usually produce the dynamics, as written in the music, with the setting at normal, or light or heavy?



I stopped learning pieces on piano ( but plan on starting again). I'm just mostly improvising on it at the moment.


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