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Joined: Feb 2013
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Originally Posted by ZMaestro


Or you can sell the digital and add MIDI to your acoustic. Then you don't have 2 pianos taking up space. Plus you can record with the instrument that has the superior action. This is the best of both worlds.



Well *there's* an interesting suggestion; the superior action would be a real plus. Off to launch myself into yet another research project!






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Well, being the odd-ball around here, I have 4 acoustic pianos and a digital! smile

The advantage of a digital stage piano is that you can transport it very easily for outside performances or inside performances very easily. The digital is certainly not an acoustic, but a close second. The portability and versatility in itself if worth having one.

Plus, when my grandchildren come over for visit, they like to play the digital because of all the different sounds and accompaniment. They call it the "funky piano". And, it keeps them from pounding on my acoustics, to an extent. smile

Rick


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Good point about the portability, Rickster. I don't play much outside my home now, but if I ever did, bringing the DP along would be much easier that strapping the Kawai on my back, haha.


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Originally Posted by Radio.Octave
... For those who play both digitals and acoustics, do you find that going back and forth between the two messes with you technique?


A bit.


Originally Posted by ebonykawai
... digital upstairs near the bedrooms, so I got something that can be quiet when I need it to be. smile


Mine too... so I got something when I cannot hear myself playing the U3 with the top open.


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I am fortunate enough to own both an acoustic grand and a digital. Living in a very small apartment, it is essential that I have both, since I limit my time on the grand to one hour a day to respect my neighbors. If I had my druthers, I would only play the acoustic. However, the digital is awesome for when I need to practice beyond 8 pm or when I just need to get in a long session. Also, I try to limit scales and exercises and really tedious practice on my grand to not annoy my neighbors (who- knock on wood- have never complained!).

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Originally Posted by Radio.Octave
For those who play both digitals and acoustics, do you find that going back and forth between the two messes with you technique?


No, quite the opposite. If you only have and play one keyboard instrument, you don't develop the ability to adapt to others that you may encounter elsewhere.

It matters a lot what kind of digital you get. Some come quite close to emulating acoustics. Others quite close to emulating a row of doorbell buttons. A reasonable quality digital will be better than many of the worn out and unmaintained acoustics you'll find in bars, restaurants, and private clubs.




-- J.S.

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Originally Posted by JohnSprung
No, quite the opposite. If you only have and play one keyboard instrument, you don't develop the ability to adapt to others that you may encounter elsewhere.


THIS. Unless we play for a church or school, or are actively taking lessons, many of us don't have an opportunity to play another piano other than our own. As fun as it is to become extremely familiar with your own piano, it can be a rather shocking adjustment to suddenly play a different piano (as recently happened to me at a family funeral).

I played exclusively on a Privia for about a decade, then bought a grand. Moving back and forth gives my fingers an opportunity to adapt to two different keyboards - something many people don't have access to.


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I am considering to buy a digital for one sole purpose: composition. So that I don't have to write down everything.

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Oops- didn't answer the other part of the question. No, I don't think going back and forth between an acoustic and a digital piano messes with my technique. That said, someone first learning the piano should use an acoustic. I've been playing the piano for over 25 years. I accommodated my playing to a DP just a few years ago, but I wouldn't have wanted to build a foundation on a DP. It's just a different instrument from an acoustic. As the owner of both acoustic and digital pianos, I agree it gives you some flexibility when it comes to performing outside your home.

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I own an Mason & Hamlin BB 7' Semi-Concert Grand, a Yamaha C3 6' Conservatory Grand, and a Yamaha Clavinova CLP-560 88-key Weighted Digital Piano, 32-note polyphony - circa 1994 (which is now over my mom's house). My wife also owns a very excellent Technics SX-PX662 88-key Graded Hammer Weighted Digital Piano, 64-note polyphony - circa 2001 - that we keep in our 4 year old twin's play area. I've attached my oldie, but goodie, Yamaha TG-33 Tone Generator to the Technics Digital for additional instrumental and sound effects.

BUT...
I also have a PianoDisc & ProRecord Optical Key Sensing Recording System that was installed in my Mason & Hamlin BB at the factory, which turns this piano into a MIDI controller, recording device and player piano. This has replaced both the Technics and Yamaha as my primary digital recording device.

I currently use it mainly for creating MIDI Recordings (in parallel with my Digital Audio Recording) and occasional output to Notation software.


Jason Solomonides
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Nope, it doesn't mess you up, it actually makes you better. At least I hope so!

Two acoustics in my life (Yamaha G3, Bosendorfer 220), three different digitals (Nord Piano 2, Stage 2 and Electro 5 -- all with very different actions) and a AvantGrand digital hybrid that neatly splits the difference.

The AvantGrand has the stiffest action. Makes my fingers very strong. Also has MIDI, which is nice.

The Bosendorfer has the most responsive action, and shows all sorts of flaws in my technique. When I gig, the Nord acoustics are a breeze by comparison. And unweighted organ/synth technique is altogether different.


Life is too short to be playing bad music.

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Originally Posted by Eldridge
I am a classical pianist, and I find that even on its most resistant setting that the touch on my digital is too light for my taste; so I don't use it for practice.


Although I'm a play-for-my-own-enjoyment rather than a classical pianist, I agree with Eldridge that my digital's touch is much lighter than my acoustic. Since I don't have much in the way of technique, I can't say switching back and forth is a problem. But the digital is great fun with all its bells and whistles. In an apartment I'm limited to how much time I can spend on the acoustic, so the digital with its headphones is valuable to me.


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Digitals don't all have the same touch. They vary even more widely than do acoustics. Go to a big piano store and try a lot of acoustics. Then go to a Guitar Center or Sam Ash or whatever and try a lot of digitals. Talking about touch isn't as useful as just getting a feel for it by trying a lot of instruments.



-- J.S.

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