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On Friday I went to a clients house to "tune" her Steinway B. I had tuned it back in December. When I showed up the piano was in tune. But after playing the piano for a couple of minutes, I could tell the voicing had gotten very "spicy". So the tuning appointment turned into a voicing session. I needled everything down, lightly reshaped the hammers to reduce string cuts, and "pounded" in the voicing. The rest of the time was spent going back and forth with her playing various repertoire and she worked with me and her husband to nitpick the tuning for an hour.

I thought it would be fun to start a thread about the "full service approach".

Do you have any stories to share that can inspire others?


Ryan Sowers,
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I had an "interesting" day yesterday!

My first appointment was at a Korean Church - they have two pianos, one being a Korean grand that I have been picking away at for several years. When I arrived the piano was up to pitch and the unisons were pretty good. There were a couple of regulation issues that I decided to focus on: The damper lift with the pedal was somewhat uneven, and the checking was low. The voicing was also getting a little harsh.

Since the piano had a capstan adjustment for damper to pedal lift, it was pretty easy to even things up. While I was in there I noticed one of the spoons was quite a bit off from its neighbor - I checked it when I put the piano in and sure enough, that damper was lifting significantly earlier in the key stroke than its neighbor. Just lining up the spoon with its neighbor fixed it.

The checking issue was being exacerbated by the "back check destroying" hammer tails that are not uncommon on these types of grands. The aggressive grooves in the tails are prematurely wearing out the backcheck leather. I took some pictures of the backchecks to show the church. Hopefully they will fit replacement into their budget in the next couple of years. I quickly ran some 80 grit sandpaper over the tails just to smooth them out a bit and remove some of the glazing. I then went through and reset the back checks.

I generally have good success setting the backcheck as close as possible and then test it by depressing the key while pushing down on the hammer with my other hand. This flexes the shank a bit and simulates a ff blow to the key. I do this just to make sure the tail won't catch on a hard blow. It always pays to do a couple of samples with the action on your lap and then with it back in the piano, as sometimes things change.

After the backchecks were set, I checked the rep springs. Most were OK but a few were too jumpy.

When I test drove the piano I noticed a couple of subtle clicks on a couple of notes in the midrange. It turned out the pinning was a bit loose, so I repinned those two hammer flanges.

The hammer shape was still OK from previous reshaping efforts, so I just did some quick and judicious needling to bring it down some. I always like to follow needing with "pounding in". I put a cloth on the strings and mute/immobilize them with one hand while giving each key a fff blow with my other hand. Then I go back over it again with an in-between the string voicing tool (my favorite is from Pianoforte Supply - its like a machinists pencil) and make sure things are even note-to-note.

I was about an hour and 20 minutes in when I got a call from my secretary (AKA my wife!) who asked me where I was. Then with a shock I had the awful realization that I was at the wrong Korean Church! There was another one literally 2 miles up the same road with very similar pianos. I had switched them in my mind!

Luckily the other church was very nice about me missing the appointment - and we offered to tune one of their other pianos free of charge to make up for the inconvenience of the pastor having waited for me.

The other church accidentally received a free service. Question: Does accidental charity still count??


Ryan Sowers,
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Originally Posted by rysowers
I had an "interesting" day yesterday!

My first appointment was at a Korean Church - they have two pianos, one being a Korean grand that I have been picking away at for several years. When I arrived the piano was up to pitch and the unisons were pretty good. There were a couple of regulation issues that I decided to focus on: The damper lift with the pedal was somewhat uneven, and the checking was low. The voicing was also getting a little harsh.

Since the piano had a capstan adjustment for damper to pedal lift, it was pretty easy to even things up. While I was in there I noticed one of the spoons was quite a bit off from its neighbor - I checked it when I put the piano in and sure enough, that damper was lifting significantly earlier in the key stroke than its neighbor. Just lining up the spoon with its neighbor fixed it.

The checking issue was being exacerbated by the "back check destroying" hammer tails that are not uncommon on these types of grands. The aggressive grooves in the tails are prematurely wearing out the backcheck leather. I took some pictures of the backchecks to show the church. Hopefully they will fit replacement into their budget in the next couple of years. I quickly ran some 80 grit sandpaper over the tails just to smooth them out a bit and remove some of the glazing. I then went through and reset the back checks.

I generally have good success setting the backcheck as close as possible and then test it by depressing the key while pushing down on the hammer with my other hand. This flexes the shank a bit and simulates a ff blow to the key. I do this just to make sure the tail won't catch on a hard blow. It always pays to do a couple of samples with the action on your lap and then with it back in the piano, as sometimes things change.

After the backchecks were set, I checked the rep springs. Most were OK but a few were too jumpy.

When I test drove the piano I noticed a couple of subtle clicks on a couple of notes in the midrange. It turned out the pinning was a bit loose, so I repinned those two hammer flanges.

The hammer shape was still OK from previous reshaping efforts, so I just did some quick and judicious needling to bring it down some. I always like to follow needing with "pounding in". I put a cloth on the strings and mute/immobilize them with one hand while giving each key a fff blow with my other hand. Then I go back over it again with an in-between the string voicing tool (my favorite is from Pianoforte Supply - its like a machinists pencil) and make sure things are even note-to-note.

I was about an hour and 20 minutes in when I got a call from my secretary (AKA my wife!) who asked me where I was. Then with a shock I had the awful realization that I was at the wrong Korean Church! There was another one literally 2 miles up the same road with very similar pianos. I had switched them in my mind!

Luckily the other church was very nice about me missing the appointment - and we offered to tune one of their other pianos free of charge to make up for the inconvenience of the pastor having waited for me.

The other church accidentally received a free service. Question: Does accidental charity still count??


Interesting story, Ryan! And yes, accidental charity does still count - because you offered it to them for free! A lot of people wouldn't take responsibility for the mistake like you did, so good for you. smile

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Thanks Ando, my decision to offer a free service is mostly motivated by self-preservation than moral high ground! smile One of the fears we face these days is the threat of poor online reviews! I always hope to turn a problem into a positive experience for the client.

Oh man! My second appointment today was a doozy! An small Kimball grand from the 40's. The first thing I noticed when I played the piano was the sharps knocking against the name board. It was an odd design - no key cover. It was tricky getting the action out. the music desk had a hidden sliding hinge pin type of clasp in the bottom rear of each side. The name board was attached with screws coming into through the plate. And if that wasn't bad enough, it also had the "movers used a longer screw in the leg" syndrome where a leg screw was binding on the action preventing it from coming all the way out.

Another issue was the sustain pedal wasn't returning to rest position. The leaf spring attached to the underside of the piano that exerts some downward pressure on the sustain trap lever was sitting below the trap lever not doing anything. So I removed the spring and replaced it where it would actually work, and lubricated the contact point. I also noticed that the leather where the damper rod touches the trap lever was gone so I glued a new piece of thick leather in there - which also fixed the huge free play in the sustain pedal.

The action was full of gunk and when I pulled it out a mass of dust bunnies came with it. The lady of the house was embarrassed but I reassured her that this is all par for the course, and its why my vacuum cleaner always comes with me tucked in a rolling suitcase with lots of rags, and other miscellaneous cleaning supplies.

It was very satisfying to slide the action back into a clean action cavity, with out the sandy gritty sound of the action sliding on all the debris.

The tuning was mostly a touch up, thank goodness because the time flew by!


Ryan Sowers,
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This morning I tuned the piano at the church that I was supposed to tune on Tuesday!

It's a Young Chang and it had some "sticky keys". The most obvious problem was the 2 pens and a pencil clacking around in the action. One hammer was slow in the middle, so I repinned it. That same note also had a repetition lever flange that had come unglued from the rest the wippen. There was another note near the treble break that also had a loose repetition lever flange.

Speaking of glue: I carry several types with me in my main kit
Tacky glue (great for felt and leather)
Tite Bond molding and trim glue (great for gluing hammers back on)
Tite Bond wood glue
CA glue: thick, medium, and thin, and accelerator
Glue stick

Since I had the action out, I took out the fastvac and blew out the action cavity, action, and soundboard/tuning pin area. Since I tend to do this every time, it doesn't make a big mess to do this. It's good to stay on top of it.

Here's a pic of my vac:
[Linked Image]
It works well as a blower, and I carry two sets of hoses so I can use suction and blowing at the same time, which can also help control mess if you are careful.

I do not believe that most piano technicians routinely vacuum/blow out cliets' pianos. I have heard many times "my last technician never did that!" and it helps justify my higher fee.

Before I put the action back in I corrected a rogue damper that was lifting early.

After running through the tuning, I almost always do some voicing. This piano has been a challenge as it is a thin margin between "clangy" tone and dead tone. I continue to be surprised out how different sets of hammers react to voicing. It's always best to experiment on a few notes before going for "wholesale" types of changes. On this piano, a deep needle right at the edge of string cuts took the metallic edge off the sound without losing too much of the brilliance and clarity. I overdid it on a couple of notes and went over them with a sandpaper paddle. I almost always "pound in" a voicing to simulate a few hours of play to make sure that things are stable.


Ryan Sowers,
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Olympia, WA
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I tuned for a church with a Yamaha C5 that I have been servicing for almost 10 years. It has a partial DC system (50 + 38 watts of dehumidification and humididstat) and they keep the piano covered when not in use.

The tuning was solid. I started with my usual routine of pulling the action and getting out my fast vac and blowing everything out. I checked the DC system.

When I played the piano, the most noticeable issue was a click in the sustain pedal. The next biggest issue was just that the voicing was getting strident, especially in the bass section.

The pedal click was coming from the pedal box. Since I wouldn't have to do much tuning I went ahead and used that time and removed the lyre, and the bottom of the pedal box. The click was coming from the pedal pins having too much free play in the plastic dowels that support them. By hammering on the dowels I was able to close the pin holes enough to make them snug on the pins again. Reassembled the lyre and the problem was solved.

I finished by spending about 30 minutes go over the voicing. The bass took a couple of passes with a 3 needle Japanese voicing tool. Here's a picture of the one I use:

[Linked Image]

It's a great tool! I use German needles that I get from Pianotek. They seem to be the strongest I have used so far. The tiny hex key stores inside the handle under a screw on cap. I drilled anther hole in that area under the cap to store extra needles so I always have some right with the tool.


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I tuned a C & A Hamburg D recently. I noticed a small screw near the tuning pins, so I checked the music desk and found that many of the screws were loose, and some were missing. I tightened the loose ones, replaced the screw I found, checked for more lost screws, and left a note to replace the missing screws. Glad to know I am not the only one with a screw loose!


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So often Steinway desks can have the screws that hold the desk to the frame work loose when a pianists is writing on music placed there. I check them when I am removing the desk to tune. If they are loose I tighten them. If they are starting to strip out I disassemble it and rebuild the threads in the wood with the thinnest super glue. Then I put the desk back together at the end of the tuning which is plenty long enough for the glue to cure.

I carry the teflon plumbers pipe thread tape to use to fill up slightly loose pedal bushings and trap work pins.


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Great tips, BDB and Ed! I'll start checking those screws! And I really like the teflon tape idea! Excellent.


Ryan Sowers,
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Sometimes it is easy to get in over your head in appointments!

Yesterday I had a new client with an Acrosonic that had a very sluggish action. I pulled one of the worst hammer flanges (no easy task with the action in) and treated it with some Protek and vigorously exercised it for 10-15 seconds. It helped but not enough.

Since the family lives way out in the countryside, I decided I'd try to dive in and see what I could get done. It's always a bit of a tough decision to pull a spinet action at an appointment. However this was an action with a pickup rail, so its a little quicker.

I like to pull the 2 dampers ad the bass/tenor break and use them as clamps on the pickup fingers to keep the rail and the fingers from coming apart. It works like a charm, with the added bonus that you wont have to worry about ripping off those dampers when pulling the action.

With the action out, I took it outside and blew out a substantial amount of dust. Then at the dining room table, I treated all the flanges with Protek. I then put the action back in, but didn't secure it in place yet with the screws and bolts. I just wanted to see if the flanges were free. There were about 7 that still did not want to return reliable, so I marked them with chalk, pulled it out again, and repinned those parts. By the time I got the action back in and working I was at my 2 hour point, but in general, I'm OK going going to 2.5 hours. I wanted to at least run through a quick and dirty tuning.

A frequent technique I use when tuning a piano that is flat, is to quickly pull one string of each plain wire unison up a little over twice as sharp as the note is flat. It is not done with any real precision. To do a whole section takes under a minute. The goal is that when I'm bringing two strings of a unison up to pitch, I'll be bringing one down a little more. It can go a long way towards counteracting drift.

So for speed tuning, I'll pretension quickly using the above method. Through in a temperament strip in the middle and just ballpark the temperament and octaves in the midrange. Then I pull the strip and install it "every other one" so that I can pull in the second string of the unison without having to move any mutes around. I pull in the third string by shifting the strip over using the same "every other" method.

The bass I tune without mutes. I listen to the sound of the octave, and then pull one string of a bichord up to beat a little faster than how the octave sounded and then pull the other up to match. It's basically an exaggerated "shimming" technique. I do the same thing in the treble using a single mute: listen to the octave. Mimic the beating in the unison and then pull the second string up to match. The third string (if I estimated correctly) should be more sharp than the other strings were flat, and I bring it down.

By the time I played the piano a little and made out the invoice it was close to 3 hours. Luckily my last appointment was flexible and didn't mind me running late. The owner of the Acrosonic was super happy, and gave me a tip. He had seen all the work I had done, and not only appreciated the amount of work he witnessed, but his appreciation for piano technology was greatly improved!


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Sounds like a rewarding job in the end, Ryan - even if it looked like a headache in the middle of it. It's interesting to read your field stories and get a sense of what your day is like. Nice job.

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Thank you for sharing Ryan.

Just a suggestion which I think will compliment and enhance your pitch adjusting and tuning. Instead of using one strip mute and then reinserting it, use the two strip mute method. I know that there are many muting methods (I have used a number of them, as I am sure you have too) but the two strip method is extremely efficient for pitch adjusting and for tuning.

Last edited by Mark Davis; 03/29/16 04:29 PM. Reason: Re read Ryans post and got the answer to my deleted questions

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Originally Posted by rysowers
Sometimes it is easy to get in over your head in appointments!

Yesterday I had a new client with an Acrosonic that had a very sluggish action. I pulled one of the worst hammer flanges (no easy task with the action in) and treated it with some Protek and vigorously exercised it for 10-15 seconds. It helped but not enough.

Since the family lives way out in the countryside, I decided I'd try to dive in and see what I could get done. It's always a bit of a tough decision to pull a spinet action at an appointment. However this was an action with a pickup rail, so its a little quicker.

I like to pull the 2 dampers ad the bass/tenor break and use them as clamps on the pickup fingers to keep the rail and the fingers from coming apart. It works like a charm, with the added bonus that you wont have to worry about ripping off those dampers when pulling the action.

With the action out, I took it outside and blew out a substantial amount of dust. Then at the dining room table, I treated all the flanges with Protek. I then put the action back in, but didn't secure it in place yet with the screws and bolts. I just wanted to see if the flanges were free. There were about 7 that still did not want to return reliable, so I marked them with chalk, pulled it out again, and repinned those parts. By the time I got the action back in and working I was at my 2 hour point, but in general, I'm OK going going to 2.5 hours. I wanted to at least run through a quick and dirty tuning.

A frequent technique I use when tuning a piano that is flat, is to quickly pull one string of each plain wire unison up a little over twice as sharp as the note is flat. It is not done with any real precision. To do a whole section takes under a minute. The goal is that when I'm bringing two strings of a unison up to pitch, I'll be bringing one down a little more. It can go a long way towards counteracting drift.

So for speed tuning, I'll pretension quickly using the above method. Through in a temperament strip in the middle and just ballpark the temperament and octaves in the midrange. Then I pull the strip and install it "every other one" so that I can pull in the second string of the unison without having to move any mutes around. I pull in the third string by shifting the strip over using the same "every other" method.

The bass I tune without mutes. I listen to the sound of the octave, and then pull one string of a bichord up to beat a little faster than how the octave sounded and then pull the other up to match. It's basically an exaggerated "shimming" technique. I do the same thing in the treble using a single mute: listen to the octave. Mimic the beating in the unison and then pull the second string up to match. The third string (if I estimated correctly) should be more sharp than the other strings were flat, and I bring it down.

By the time I played the piano a little and made out the invoice it was close to 3 hours. Luckily my last appointment was flexible and didn't mind me running late. The owner of the Acrosonic was super happy, and gave me a tip. He had seen all the work I had done, and not only appreciated the amount of work he witnessed, but his appreciation for piano technology was greatly improved!
I think the term for what you did it is "targeted!" Maybe not a totally immaculate result, but you got a heck of a lot done in three hours and left the owner with, if not a Bosendorfer, a far better playing and sounding instrument.

Don


Don, playing the blues in Austin, Texas on a 48" family heirloom Steinway upright, 100 year old 54" Weber upright, unknown make turn of the century 54" upright -- says "Whittier NY" on the plate, Starr, ca. 100 years old full size upright.
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I've had good luck spraying wet TFL on sticky Baldwin parts. Did that earlier this week on a sluggish Baldwin Acro with good results.

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Originally Posted by rysowers
I tuned for a church with a Yamaha C5 that I have been servicing for almost 10 years. It has a partial DC system (50 + 38 watts of dehumidification and humididstat) and they keep the piano covered when not in use.

The tuning was solid. I started with my usual routine of pulling the action and getting out my fast vac and blowing everything out. I checked the DC system.

When I played the piano, the most noticeable issue was a click in the sustain pedal. The next biggest issue was just that the voicing was getting strident, especially in the bass section.

The pedal click was coming from the pedal box. Since I wouldn't have to do much tuning I went ahead and used that time and removed the lyre, and the bottom of the pedal box. The click was coming from the pedal pins having too much free play in the plastic dowels that support them. By hammering on the dowels I was able to close the pin holes enough to make them snug on the pins again. Reassembled the lyre and the problem was solved.

I finished by spending about 30 minutes go over the voicing. The bass took a couple of passes with a 3 needle Japanese voicing tool. Here's a picture of the one I use:

[Linked Image]

It's a great tool! I use German needles that I get from Pianotek. They seem to be the strongest I have used so far. The tiny hex key stores inside the handle under a screw on cap. I drilled anther hole in that area under the cap to store extra needles so I always have some right with the tool.



Is it recommended to keep the piano covered when not in use?


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Originally Posted by PhilipInChina


Is it recommended to keep the piano covered when not in use?


I recommend in churches and schools to keep the lid closed with a piano cover to help the De humidifier work better.

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+1 Bob!


Ryan Sowers,
Pianova Piano Service
Olympia, WA
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