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Estonia Pianos
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Well, I don't think it is correct, but it is used commonly now.

Also, saying things like "That's me!" or "It's him!" is commonly accepted, even though those aren't correct, either. wink

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Morodiene: If you do a search for the word "tpyos" you might find that I've used this format of the word since back in 2008 (in this forum, since I've been using it for much longer than 5 years)! grin

Morodiene #2154320 09/20/13 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Morodiene
Of course, using "it" implies an inanimate object.

Oh dear. I hope that doesn't apply to the usage of "It's a boy!"


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Nikolas,

Is tpyos a Greek delicacy?


Marty in Minnesota

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Originally Posted by Minnesota Marty
Nikolas,

Is tpyos a Greek delicacy?
Heh..

Actually no.

Around 2005 I was involved in the making of a very weird meta game. One of the heroes had this word "tpyos" as an annoying habit and it got stuck with me.

And later in 2006, there was also the word "awesmoe" added to my vocabulary! Both are utterly wrong, and nothing to do with Greek, but I've stolen them since then! grin

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One of my pet peeves was environmental bumper stickers (e.g. Go Green - Love our Planet - Eat Local) on automobiles. Yesterday, however, I set the peeve free.

Forrest

Last edited by woodog; 09/20/13 10:46 AM. Reason: fear of the grammar police

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Morodiene #2154367 09/20/13 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Morodiene

Why is it that so many other languages have a word for non-gender specific pronouns and we do not? I find this very annoying. So I don't think there's a right or wrong answer to this one because quite simply, we don't have a word for it.

We have: it. The implication upset people, so "their" became popular...and hence we have one; it just happens to coincide with a plurality. If we're to get upset about multiple meanings being attributed to the same word, well, um, please, avoid looking at the word "set" too closely...anywho, I like to use "s/he" when referring to particular personages, the specific (as one would use the word "faithfully"), "their" when referring to a specific personage of unspecified origin (as in "sincerely"); the pianist may use their foot...., and, of course, "one" when referring to an unspecific personage of either unspecified origin or not, sparing, of course, the assumption of special congruence; one may use one's foot smile Um...I wouldn't abandon the principle for non-human entities, but people start getting confused and it just becomes insufferable; the density of one's bones is paramount in the consideration of when one is capable of flight. I...um...I'm not a stickler for these kind of things, but there *are* definitions of words and *implications* of words...I wish people would could differentiate between the two with greater prejudice.
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Originally Posted by WinsomeAllegretto
It depends on who whom you ask; but I think you are right. laugh


Sorry!


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BruceD #2154374 09/20/13 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Vid
[...]about where the pianist finds it hard to be soft so they just lay their foot down on the pedal for the duration of a soft passage.


... a sentence with a singular subject followed by a plural pronoun and a plural possessive pronoun referring to the same singular subject :

the pianist - they - their foot ... What?


In point of fact, Vid was using not only what has become accepted but what is accepted as correct, in that it avoids a cumbersome his/her, s/he, construction.

I know and accept its use but avoid it in writing when I can; I just can't help being a nerd, at times!

Cheers!


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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by WinsomeAllegretto
It depends on who whom you ask; but I think you are right. laugh


Sorry!


Wow. And I call myself an English tutor! Sorry about that.

Nikolas #2154405 09/20/13 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikolas


The word "literally" is now misused so commonly that dictionaries are including an alternate definition, e.g., this definition taken from merriam-webster.com:

Definition of LITERALLY
1: in a literal sense or manner : actually <took the remark literally> <was literally insane>
2: in effect : virtually <will literally turn the world upside down to combat cruelty or injustice — Norman Cousins>


Now you have a word that means itself and its opposite, thereby rendering the word meaningless.

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I don't understand all the fuss about literally, myself; surely it's just like any other hyperbole? "I bought millions of pineapples..." "I'm sorry, don't you mean '25' pineapples? Don't you know what 'millions' *actually* means?" Um...note; hyperbole, not exaggeration. Exaggeration is not meant to be noticed (I bought 26 pineapples) and a vacation from the truth, hyperbole is intended to represent an atmosphere; as a story teller of old may have done. I mean, um, it's...it's just hyperbole...lest we invite the pedantry-constabulaire into the respite of even our favourite phrases, must we not bar it now? I mean...it's basically just an expression....sorry, if I may be so bold as to presume, but it's literally an expression...this does not render the expression, or its literal, original understanding, as useless, ape to whom's own business will not keep, for it is not merely in their opposite nature that we have to consider their usefulness; I bled the radiator. From the context, we ascribe that I did not impale it or lacerate it...so too with literally; "I literally burned myself on the oven" is, as hyperbole, remember, does not truly beget exaggeration, an instance of the first meaning..."I literally killed myself running up the hill" is clearly an example of the second, unless it is some ill-formed and crude suicide note. So the word is not useless...it merely requires a touch of thought...um...if you want words that don't require this, that you consider all else without use, well...I'm sure we can find some in pretty books with lots of pictures..."the cow is in the field".....oh, but, um, does it mean vegetative field? Magnetic? Ah...the mysteries of life...language, I won't argue, can seem downright silly, even counter-constructive at times...but it lives, it lives with or without us; it is up to us to keep up, not the other way around.
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I don't understand how "literally" can be used as an example of hyperbole. I literally just don't understand it!


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The preposition rule is one with which I cannot up put.


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It's figuratively impossible, so don't fret, pet laugh


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Originally Posted by FSO
I don't understand all the fuss about literally, myself; surely it's just like any other hyperbole? "I bought millions of pineapples..." "I'm sorry, don't you mean '25' pineapples? Don't you know what 'millions' *actually* means?" Um...note; hyperbole, not exaggeration. Exaggeration is not meant to be noticed (I bought 26 pineapples) and a vacation from the truth, hyperbole is intended to represent an atmosphere; as a story teller of old may have done. I mean, um, it's...it's just hyperbole...lest we invite the pedantry-constabulaire into the respite of even our favourite phrases, must we not bar it now? I mean...it's basically just an expression....sorry, if I may be so bold as to presume, but it's literally an expression...this does not render the expression, or its literal, original understanding, as useless, ape to whom's own business will not keep, for it is not merely in their opposite nature that we have to consider their usefulness; I bled the radiator. From the context, we ascribe that I did not impale it or lacerate it...so too with literally; "I literally burned myself on the oven" is, as hyperbole, remember, does not truly beget exaggeration, an instance of the first meaning..."I literally killed myself running up the hill" is clearly an example of the second, unless it is some ill-formed and crude suicide note. So the word is not useless...it merely requires a touch of thought...um...if you want words that don't require this, that you consider all else without use, well...I'm sure we can find some in pretty books with lots of pictures..."the cow is in the field".....oh, but, um, does it mean vegetative field? Magnetic? Ah...the mysteries of life...language, I won't argue, can seem downright silly, even counter-constructive at times...but it lives, it lives with or without us; it is up to us to keep up, not the other way around.
Xxx


The whole point of using "literally" used to be to indicate that a statement was not hyperbole. Now it either indicates that it is hyperbole or that it is not hyperbole.

In your example, "I literally killed myself running up the hill", I might say this if I suffered cardiac arrest (the clinical definition of death) while running up the hill and was subsequently revived. In this usage it adds emphasis by indicating that even though the statement seems like hyperbole, it is not. Now there are people that just use the word for emphasis without regard for its actual meaning.

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Well...that is, in and of itself, the distinction, is it not? It's not up to the content of the word but the delivery and context to lead us to its meaning...um...out of interest, do you hold this contention with the word "actually" too? How do you feel about the word "really" which, once, meant truthfully but now means "very much so", or, arguably, "almost absolute"...almost, of course, meaning, in a simplistic way, "not" and, as such, "really" means "not"...how do you feel both of and about this? laugh Um...sorry, if it ever seems like I'm having a go at you, I'm really not....... laugh
Xxx


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No worries, even if you were having a go at me.

I do not really care about how people use words like "literally". You will notice that I never said that it peeved me. I just find it amusing and a bit sad. I understand that language is always evolving and that definitions are determined by usage, not the other way round. The only problem I have is when language becomes so imprecise as to cause problems in communication. Communication is, after all, the only reason for language to exist.

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You know, this has actually come up as a discussion recently with my flatmates...um...I'm okay with word definitions being added; it begets colour into expressionism and gives a wider (and more humourous) berth of possibility...I *cannot* abide when the meaning of a word changes (for instance: awful)..um...I don't know, it's fine...I suppose....*grumble* smile I will note, and I'm sure it will come across as xenophobic, but the British seem far more accepting of imprecision...Americans, I hesitate to note, prefer to have things more...spelt out... wink Really though, I mean, um, sarcasm is generally considered negative in America, no? Oh, and before you wonder, my best friend is American....soo.... wink #satire
Xxx


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Originally Posted by BruceD
I don't understand how "literally" can be used as an example of hyperbole.


I literally don't understand that statement. Metaphorically speaking, of course. wink


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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