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Originally Posted by Polyphonist
The perfect student would be one where I could find absolutely nothing to criticize.


In that case I think you will have a very long wait. Even the most experied of pianists get criticized, from their mannerisms, to the way they play.

There is not a single pianist alive today that anybody does not criticize.


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Originally Posted by Chris H.
The students I enjoy teaching most and really look forward to their lessons are the ones who always try their best. It doesn't matter about the level of playing or even their ability. If they have tried and are willing to learn then there is always plenty to do. It also helps if they communicate with you, particularly if there is something they don't understand.

So as a student, if you want to keep your teacher happy it's pretty simple. Try your best, communicate with them, be polite and courteous, show respect by turning up for lessons on time and paying fees promptly.

On the flip side the only lessons I don't enjoy are the ones where the student shows up unprepared and gives the impression they would rather not be there.


I try my best as a student, I am enthusiastic, take a keen interest in the pieces I play and realize that even though a piece does not grab me and I do not like it, I play it for experience because each piece gives you learning in different skills.

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Originally Posted by AZN
1) loves music
2) loves piano
3) practices regularly
4) remembers what I say
5) shows up to lessons and pays tuition on time
6) enjoys playing in front of an audience
7) is creative, imaginative, and artistic/musical
8) respects people
9) keeps an open mind for new ideas
10) thinks for him/herself instead of just imitating, copying, and/or emulating a model


thumb thumb

I like this list a lot!!


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Originally Posted by adultpianist
Originally Posted by Polyphonist
The perfect student would be one where I could find absolutely nothing to criticize.


In that case I think you will have a very long wait. Even the most experied of pianists get criticized, from their mannerisms, to the way they play.

There is not a single pianist alive today that anybody does not criticize.


And here we are again - I agree with you, and this is exactly why the "perfect student" doesn't exist.


Regards,

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Originally Posted by Polyphonist
Originally Posted by adultpianist
Originally Posted by Polyphonist
The perfect student would be one where I could find absolutely nothing to criticize.


In that case I think you will have a very long wait. Even the most experied of pianists get criticized, from their mannerisms, to the way they play.

There is not a single pianist alive today that anybody does not criticize.



Then again, perfect teachers might be almost as rare.
And here we are again - I agree with you, and this is exactly why the "perfect student" doesn't exist.


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I would think that a question like this has a pragmatic purpose, rather than being an invitation to philosophical debate. A student asking this question wants to know what kinds of things to do and not to do. Rather than getting hung up on a particular word, it makes more sense to address the purpose. If you are teaching, and a student needs your help, are you going to respond literally to a poorly phrased question, or are you going to surmise where the help is needed, and respond accordingly?

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Different teachers will give somewhat different responses, especially in this department:

1) thinking for oneself vs.
2) copying the teacher

There are teachers who are obviously very gifted performers, who would love to make carbon copies of themselves as artists. That's not necessarily a bad thing.

On the other hand, there are teachers who want to develop artists who are capable of making artistic decisions on their own.

Of course, there is a lot of common ground between the two.


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thank you all so much! polyphonist IS correct tho, nobody is perfect, so it was a poorly worded question. everyone has room for improvement thus making it a poor question. yes! these are all great tips and im glad to see opinions from multiple teachers.

to expand on what aznpiano said. at the very start there isn't a whole lot of room for me to really use the knowledge i have to make those decisions correct? I've been avoiding trying to steer my teacher and just letting him do his thing and everything he asks. I'm starting to the get to the point where i'm able to draw my own conclusions and didn't know the etiquette or if it is considered rude to ask "were you planning on teaching me xyz".
as i haven't learned any scales at all, just chords it seems from a method book. I LOVED dinking around and having fun "improvising" but learning the science behind what im doing would be great. I explore and find sounds i love and come to find out i just discovered keys and playing things in the same key and how scales are the notes that make up a certain key.



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Originally Posted by keystring
I would think that a question like this has a pragmatic purpose, rather than being an invitation to philosophical debate. A student asking this question wants to know what kinds of things to do and not to do. Rather than getting hung up on a particular word, it makes more sense to address the purpose. If you are teaching, and a student needs your help, are you going to respond literally to a poorly phrased question, or are you going to surmise where the help is needed, and respond accordingly?

I will answer (almost) any question a student asks me to the best of my ability. And yes, I will take their question at face value - I will answer what they asked, not what they might have meant to ask.

Last edited by Polyphonist; 07/15/13 06:27 PM.

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Originally Posted by AZNpiano


Here's my definition of a "perfect student."

1) loves music
2) loves piano
3) practices regularly
4) remembers what I say
5) shows up to lessons and pays tuition on time
6) enjoys playing in front of an audience
7) is creative, imaginative, and artistic/musical
8) respects people
9) keeps an open mind for new ideas
10) thinks for him/herself instead of just imitating, copying, and/or emulating a model


As a student, I can appreciate all of these except maybe #4. I certainly try to remember what my teacher says, but I sure can't remember to apply it in all situations. He often has to tell me things about my technique that I know he has told me before. (But wait, this means I remember them, at least enough to feel that I ought to know them. So maybe it's not so bad... smile )


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Originally Posted by Polyphonist
Originally Posted by keystring
I would think that a question like this has a pragmatic purpose, rather than being an invitation to philosophical debate. A student asking this question wants to know what kinds of things to do and not to do. Rather than getting hung up on a particular word, it makes more sense to address the purpose. If you are teaching, and a student needs your help, are you going to respond literally to a poorly phrased question, or are you going to surmise where the help is needed, and respond accordingly?

I will answer (almost) any question a student asks me to the best of my ability. And yes, I will take their question at face value - I will answer what they asked, not what they might have meant to ask.

I'm no piano teacher by any means. But my job is very similar to that of a piano teacher, from a teaching perspective. I teach people how to generate and install SSL certificates (computer security stuff). I get people that have a great idea of what they are doing and i get people that have 0 idea. What makes me good at my job is that i understand the IDEA the person is trying to convey to me, not beat them up for using incorrect verbiage. I'll clarify what they said with an easy to understand analogy to check with them for my understanding of what they are trying to convey to me. I feel these are good techniques for communicating to people on a personal level and accomplishes more. Communication is about conveying ideas and thoughts to another person, the method of doing so is moot in my humble opinion. How one uses that method DOES help convey your thoughts more efficiently, I don't disagree with you there. I used a poor word choice, most definitely. However, as a teacher myself, I find I'm THAT much of a better teacher for knowing how to "read between the lines" if you will.
I believe everyone should, teachers especially, should strive for this quality.

Last edited by Sweet06; 07/15/13 11:33 PM.

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As a student, I am always coming up with my own strategies for learning. I know what to do and what not to do.

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Originally Posted by Sweet06
I'm no piano teacher by any means. But my job is very similar to that of a piano teacher, from a teaching perspective. I teach people how to generate and install SSL certificates (computer security stuff). I get people that have a great idea of what they are doing and i get people that have 0 idea. What makes me good at my job is that i understand the IDEA the person is trying to convey to me, not beat them up for using incorrect verbiage. I'll clarify what they said with an easy to understand analogy to check with them for my understanding of what they are trying to convey to me. I feel these are good techniques for communicating to people on a personal level and accomplishes more. Communication is about conveying ideas and thoughts to another person, the method of doing so is moot in my humble opinion. How one uses that method DOES help convey your thoughts more efficiently, I don't disagree with you there. I used a poor word choice, most definitely. However, as a teacher myself, I find I'm THAT much of a better teacher for knowing how to "read between the lines" if you will.
I believe everyone should, teachers especially, should strive for this quality.


Well said. I, too, have taught a lot, tho not piano. There's a lot of learning, including learning from students, to being a good teacher.

And for the record, I think "perfect student" is perfectly understandable smile It's an adjective - a "perfect student" is about someone who is learning, and so it is talking about someone who learns, and someone in the role of student and all that entails. A student who "has no faults" as a student is a different person than a performer whose performance has no faults. Besides, "perfect" isn't defined only as "faultless" - in my dictionary that's not even the first defintion.

Polyphonist likes to pull chains. IMHO smile


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Originally Posted by jotur
And for the record, I think "perfect student" is perfectly understandable smile It's an adjective - a "perfect student" is about someone who is learning, and so it is talking about someone who learns, and someone in the role of student and all that entails. A student who "has no faults" as a student is a different person than a performer whose performance has no faults.

Cathy


I define perfect as performing to one's personal individual capability as it exists at that moment.


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The perfect student listens to what I say, practices hard, and comes back each week with intelligent questions.

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I think the correct word for what we are seeking (as opposed to perfect) is "ideal."


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Originally Posted by DanS
and comes back each week with intelligent questions.


like goldilocks, the questions have to be just right.

Hard enough to be interesting, not so hard you don't know the answer. <g>


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Originally Posted by MM
I think the correct word for what we are seeking (as opposed to perfect) is "ideal."

I agree. I think there is no perfect students or perfect teachers in this world, only "ideal".


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Originally Posted by ezpiano.org
Originally Posted by MM
I think the correct word for what we are seeking (as opposed to perfect) is "ideal."

I agree. I think there is no perfect students or perfect teachers in this world, only "ideal".

What's the difference?


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Polyphonist, leaving completely aside the question of perfect or ideal: are there some characteristics that you prefer a student of yours to have?


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