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Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1,217
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Joined: Oct 2010
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Daniil Trifonov Interview (In Polish)

With a very nice English transcript by our fellow PW member Mati:

Quote
I learned most of the pieces that I have played during both competitions after participating in the Chopin's competition. Three thirds of the repertoire I have already got to know during winter. I consider inappropriate to play the same repertoire in many competitions, even though it's a popular practice nowadays. Among others I have learned the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto, Mozart Piano Concerto, as well as the op. 25 etudes.

The competitions I have taken part in were very different. In Tel Aviv the competition was almost like a festival. The participants lived in the aparatments close to the sea. We could rest, get to know each other better, make friendships. During the Tchaikovsky Competition the atmosphere was much more dense and stressful. Though I was born in Nizhny Novgorod, I have lived and studied in Moscow for 9 years. I can say it is my city. It is where I was remembered, therefore the responsibility was even bigger. Of course I tried not to think about it while playing in the competition. I was concentrating solely on the music itself. Especially considering the fact that I've been on tour in Israel for 2 weeks after the Rubinstein Competition, where I've played 12 concerts in a row. Just after the last one I went to Moscow to choose the piano for the Tchaikovsky.

All three competitions are among the greatest, but the Chopin competition was very important for me. It carved the path to all of my further successes. The audience... the audience was very different in each of them. In Warsaw I could feel an extraordinary attitude towards the music of Chopin. The huge interest of the audience knowing the music well. In Tel Aviv, on the other hand, the audience understands the music, but the atmosphere is different. People are less emotional about the auditions, but a honest and positive attitude towards the participants can be easily felt. In Moscow it was different. There the audience is very demanding, being critical towards everything.

- How do you cope now, considering the great interest in you?

- Last weeks have been difficult for me. I had to find myself in the new situation. I have a general manager as well as few local ones in different countries. The last few weeks we were working on a schedule. We tried to plan it so there was not too many concerts, but also to use the offers from many different venues to the full potential. In the upcoming season I have planned 75-80 concerts. You ask about studies... of course, I have to combine playing concerts with my studies in Cleveland, where I've been appointed a very flexible curriculum. I'm in touch with my professor, who helps me choosing the new repertoire as well as helps me prepare it. These are the pieces I'll be playing for the next few months. I'm already working on a repertoire I will be playing in Spring. I have to plan everything to the tiniest details. Etudes op. 25 were the set I decided to prepare on my own, even though my professor said it's too early for me to play them. I was stubborn though. Now I am working on more etudes, including op. 10. I simply wanted to play these pieces. I work on my concert repertoire, but I also play what I love. As for the upcoming concerts - I'm preparing for my appearances in Poland, Russia, Japan, Germany, Israel, Switzerland, Great Britain, Brazil and Italy.

- What does the word career mean to you?

- I perceive career in a musical sense. It's not doing the biggest amount of concerts or something. For me the most important part is the musical development. I think I won't be participating in competitions anymore. Now I want to concentrate on discovering new pieces. I must learn to utilise every minute, I have very little time to spare. As for my other interests, I love reading. I also enjoy art a lot, as well as long many kilometre long strolls that help me calm down, refresh my mind and give me strength helping with my work at the piano.

- How do you prepare pieces?

- It's not that I always memorize them. At first I try to understand the composition. I study the form, the style. I also try to listen to old recordings of the masters - Rachmaninoff, Lipatti, Sofronitsky, Friedmann, Hoffmann, Cortot.

I will come back to my studies in Autumn, most probably in November - after concerts in Poland and Great Britain. I will go to Cleveland and will devote the whole month to my studies.

Joined: Apr 2009
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Thank You! It was a pleasure to read it! I think he is very talented, I've heard the broadcasts of Chopin and Tchaikovsky, he plays marvellously indeed...

Joined: Oct 2010
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I'm glad you enjoyed it! Trifonov truly is in the "Genius" category, and I really wish him all the best for a successful career! As this interview proves, he also a very thoughtful, intelligent person as well....I'd love to meet him!


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