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Posted By: ugafert Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 11:09 AM
Hi all, I am new to Pianoworld and the piano world as a whole. I am sorry for my naive post in advance!

My daughter (6) has taken up piano lessons on the back of her music teacher saying that she has a real talent. She has been playing recorder for a while and is really good at note reading. Now I am aware that she is only 6, so dont want to buy an expensive piano and am therefore looking for a weighted keyboard that will allow her to learn and have fun at the same time. Friends of ours have the Casio PX730 which she likes the look of (the furniture style) although her piano teacher is more a fan of the Yamaha P-45. I would like to look for a casio as my daughter likes the play along functions. We definitely want the fixed stand/funiture model. But - oh dear - there are so many different casios out there and I dont really know where to start. I would like to buy second hand around the £300/350 mark and was hoping someone could point me to a good model to look for. I have seen the PX 750 but dont know if they are all equally good. PLEASE HELP!

Thank you so very much in advance!!!! Regards Ulli
Posted By: Burkey Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 12:30 PM
Take her to try a Roland FP-10.
Posted By: dmd Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 01:26 PM
I go by this …..
Quote
...her piano teacher is more a fan of the Yamaha P-45
.

Is there any particular reason you do not want the Yamaha P-45 ?
I would recommend the Casio PX S1000.

The price is a little over £400 to buy it new (although without a stand or pedals, which cost extra).

I bought a new Casio PX S1000 for £415 (however without a stand). The Casio CS-68 furniture stand was an additional £95. And the SP-34 Triple Pedal was another £50.

The Casio PX S1000 is just excellent relative to its price, and would fine for her until she is older.

However, it doesn't have any play along function and the user interface is a little complicated (it doesn't have a screen, so you have to use the chart in the instruction manual and hold down certain keys).

You can adjust the touch settings and set them to light (which I recommend), but you have to do that every time you turn it on.


Originally Posted by ugafert

I would like to buy second hand around the £300/350 mark and was hoping someone could point me to a good model to look for. I have seen the PX 750 but dont know if they are all equally good. PLEASE HELP!

If you can stretch to around £400-£450, then you can buy good new digital pianos (as above).

If you buy a new one, you should get at least a 3 year warranty or guarantee from the manufacturer, so it's probably safer than buying a second-hand one as when you buy second-hand the manufacturer's warranty might have expired.

If you are in the UK, I recommend the online shop Rimmers, as their prices are often quite competitive, depending on the week. Although they change the prices from week to week.

This week:

Roland FP-10 (including a furniture stand) is £435.00

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/roland-fp10-digital-piano-black-stand-package-p43501

The Yamaha P125 is £455.00 (but you need to buy a stand)

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/yamaha-p125-digital-piano-black-p40910

And Casio PX S1000 is £425.00

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-px-s1000-digital-piano-white-p43589

As a deal including the Casio CS-68 stand and SP-34 Triple Pedal, it is £565.

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-px-s1000-digital-piano-white-pro-package-p43593

And it will look like this:
[Linked Image]
At her age, almost any decent manufacturer, which I would think minimally includes Casio, Yamaha, Roland, Kawai, Korg, and maybe some others, will do, as long as you get one with 88 full-sized weighted keys. If you have your heart set on a Casio with a console stand, then the PX-770 is your best bet, but if a decent wooden stand will do, then you could look at the Casio CDP-S100 wtih wooden stand, like so:
https://www.musiciansfriend.com/keyboards-midi/casio-cdp-s100cs-digital-piano-with-wooden-stand

I also think the Yamaha P-45 or the Roland FP-10 would be good choices, assuming you can also find a stand for those you like. I'm less familiar with the more affordable Kawai and Korg models, so I can't help you there. But really, anything affordable in that range will be fine at that age.
Also, if you want something that is fun for children and has a lot of different play along functions, the Casio CDP S350 might be quite a good option.

(However its action for the piano is inferior compared to the PX S1000).

The Casio CDP S350 is on sale for £389.00 at the moment (without a stand)
https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/search/casio-cdp-s350


And furniture stand for the CDP S350 (Casio CS46 stand) is an additional £74.99

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casi...d-edge-design-for-cdps100-cdps350-p43408

Or £449 as a package. https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-cdps350-ultra-compact-digital-piano-stand-package-p43407

That said, the action on the CDP S350 is less realistic than on the PX S1000, so you would be sacrificing the quality of the action for the additional fun keyboard stuff. (Also the CDP S350 might be a bit complicated for a 6 year old)
Posted By: Gombessa Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 02:00 PM
I think you are on the right path. If you like the Casio, it'll be the requirement of the Yamaha your teacher likes.

Generally speaking, the manufacturers will add a few bells and whistles every other year or so and increment the numbers, so you'll have the PX-730 one year, maybe the 750 a few years later, then 770. The Yamahas go from the P-105 to P-115 to P-125. But the base piano features that are important (the action and the tone) will likely be exactly the same. When buying used, you don't want to go too old (since you're playing the wear and tear lottery) so I'd try to find a newer model, but it doesn't have to be the current model.

There aren't any truly bad choices out there today if you stick to the major manufacturers and get a fully hammer-weighted 88 key DP. Just stay away from marginal brands like Williams, Suzuki and Alesis (to name a few you may see on stores), they tend to be a bit lower rent from reports we've seen here, though I'm sure they have some fine models too.
Posted By: ugafert Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 02:14 PM
Thank YOU Thank YOU Thank YOU... Wow this is an overwhelming response and I might need a day or two do digest and completely understand your recommendations. The reasons why we are a fan of the Casio range is that she can have some play along features, I understand the Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles and seeing that she is only 6, she quite likes that. When you talk about newer models can I take it that the Casio PX 770 is the newest model compared to the PX 730? How does it compare to the S1000? Sorry might be a very stupid question. Thanks for the heads up on the warranty, havent really though about that.
Another cheap Casio Privia option with a furniture stand would be the Casio PX760 which is £499 new.

It might be less confusing for a 6 year old, although I'm not sure it has any play along functions.

It is £499 new (so it will include a 3 year warranty from Casio)
https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-privia-px760-digital-piano-black-p21722

[Linked Image]


Here is information about it on the Casio website:
https://music.casio.co.uk/casio-privia-digital-piano-px-760bkc5


Posted By: dmd Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 03:35 PM
Originally Posted by ugafert
Thank YOU Thank YOU Thank YOU... Wow this is an overwhelming response and I might need a day or two do digest and completely understand your recommendations. The reasons why we are a fan of the Casio range is that she can have some play along features, I understand the Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles and seeing that she is only 6, she quite likes that. When you talk about newer models can I take it that the Casio PX 770 is the newest model compared to the PX 730? How does it compare to the S1000? Sorry might be a very stupid question. Thanks for the heads up on the warranty, havent really though about that.


I suggest that you listen to …. #1 - her teacher (Yamaha P-45) …. and #2 - your child …
Quote
Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles and seeing that she is only 6, she quite likes that.
.

You are trying to get something "better" but in this case less might be more.

If a child is presented with a load of "fun" things to play with she is more likely to spend her time fooling around and not learning to play the piano.

The simplest solution is often the best solution.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 03:48 PM
I am a professional pianist and a veteran piano teacher. Kawai ES110 is the closest key action to a real piano. The tone is warmer too. My daughter is 9 and she hates the Casio action but lives he Kawai feel. She can play Bach and Chopin on the Kawai action but refuses to on the Casio action.
Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by ugafert
Thank YOU Thank YOU Thank YOU... Wow this is an overwhelming response and I might need a day or two do digest and completely understand your recommendations. The reasons why we are a fan of the Casio range is that she can have some play along features, I understand the Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles and seeing that she is only 6, she quite likes that. When you talk about newer models can I take it that the Casio PX 770 is the newest model compared to the PX 730? How does it compare to the S1000? Sorry might be a very stupid question. Thanks for the heads up on the warranty, havent really though about that.


I suggest that you listen to …. #1 - her teacher (Yamaha P-45) …. and #2 - your child …
Quote
Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles and seeing that she is only 6, she quite likes that.
.

You are trying to get something "better" but in this case less might be more.

If a child is presented with a load of "fun" things to play with she is more likely to spend her time fooling around and not learning to play the piano.

The simplest solution is often the best solution.



Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music. Developing the child's interest in music and their spontaneous creativity (simple compositions) is possibly the most important thing at that age, rather than rote learning - although ideally you would encourage both at the same time.

That said, it doesn't have to be combined in the same item. I mean, you could buy her a digital and a arranger keyboard separately? Arranger keyboards are very cheap, and would be a good idea to buy as a supplement.
Originally Posted by rintincop
I am a professional pianist and a veteran piano teacher. Kawai ES110 is the closest key action to a real piano. The tone is warmer too. My daughter is 9 and she hates the Casio action but lives he Kawai feel. She can play Bach and Chopin on the Kawai action but refuses to on the Casio action.

The Kawai ES110 is a relatively cheap option as well, in the UK. Also a good thing about Kawai is they have a 6 year warranty when you buy a new digital piano (while Casio only have a 3 year warranty).

The Kawai ES110 on sale for £454 (although without a stand).
https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/kawai-es-110-portable-piano-white-p37859

The Kawai HML-1B furniture stand would be an additional £100.
https://www.gear4music.com/Keyboards-and-Pianos/Kawai-HML-1B-Stand-for-ES-110B-Stage-Piano/1IX0?
Originally Posted by ugafert
Friends of ours have the Casio PX730 which she likes the look of (the furniture style) although her piano teacher is more a fan of the Yamaha P-45.


The PX-730 should feel and sound somewhat like a real piano. Which could be enough for several years. Casio did improve (or at least change) the key action in the following generation and they also improved (or at least changed) the sound engine too.

Originally Posted by ugafert
I would like to look for a casio as my daughter likes the play along functions.


Many other brands offer digital pianos with "functions" too. And sometimes the problem with "functions" is that they are awkward to use with weird key combinations only documented in the User's Manual. Some models solve this either with a built-in touch screen (like some Casios) or with a separate mobile app to run on a phone or tablet (including but not exclusively Roland and the latest Casios). And some other Casios at least have the functions printed on the panel above the keys, so that helps a little.

Originally Posted by ugafert
We definitely want the fixed stand/funiture model.


Sure. A good idea.

Originally Posted by ugafert
But - oh dear - there are so many different casios out there and I dont really know where to start.


Start by making a list of the "functions" that are actually required.

Originally Posted by ugafert
I would like to buy second hand around the £300/350 mark and was hoping someone could point me to a good model to look for.


That depends on the "functions" that are required. Not a lot of "functions" are needed for practising piano. But some can be either fun, useful or both. Such as:
- metronome
- recording
- backing rhytms
- various non-piano sounds
- lesson features, some are "gamified" like e.g. in Roland's "Piano Partner" mobile app.

Originally Posted by ugafert
I have seen the PX 750 but dont know if they are all equally good.


Like said both the key action and the sound generator are better (or at least different) in the x50 series and beyond compared to the x30 series and below.

Originally Posted by ugafert
I understand the Yamaha is more a keyboard without the bells and wistles


Not necessarily, but with the current product portfolio e.g. Casio does seem to offer more "bells and whistles" in the more affordable models and with Yamaha you need to go for more expensive models. Roland also has "bells and whistles" in somewhat affordable models like the RP-x01 and F-1x0R models. (RP-501R and F-140R for the latest and smaller numbers for used ones.)

And if buying a used digital piano it makes sense to test each key in various ways for any extra noises. Old worn-out digital pianos can be sneaky and only make noise when you touch the keys in specific ways, like tapping without pressing all the way down or letting it bounce back app freely.
Posted By: JoeT Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 06:10 PM
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music.


Nothing develops hearing and musical gifts better than a real acoustic instrument. Doesn't have to be a piano though, there are less expensive options, that are just as good.
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
[...] the Casio CDP S350 might be quite a good option. [...] (However its action for the piano is inferior compared to the PX S1000).


Aren't they mechanically identical?

And PX-S is "smart". Though I still don't know what's "smart" about it.
Posted By: Gombessa Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 06:23 PM
Originally Posted by ugafert
How does it compare to the S1000? Sorry might be a very stupid question.


The S1000 has a newer sound engine, which I assume sounds a little better. However, it was engineered to be very small (the smallest in it's class, as Casio says) and portable, and there are some compromises in the action to achieve that goal. You might want your daughter or your teacher to try it out first before jumping the gun on it.
Originally Posted by clothearednincompo
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
[...] the Casio CDP S350 might be quite a good option. [...] (However its action for the piano is inferior compared to the PX S1000).


Aren't they mechanically identical?

And PX-S is "smart". Though I still don't know what's "smart" about it.


That's my understanding as well - they are mechanically identical, but the PX-S has some fancier software stuff goin' on, most which I doubt a beginner (or even an intermediate) pianist would notice or be able to take advantage of. Still, the PX-S1000 looks like a nice machine, so I'm certainly not advocating against purchasing it.
Originally Posted by JoeT
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music.


Nothing develops hearing and musical gifts better than a real acoustic instrument. Doesn't have to be a piano though, there are less expensive options, that are just as good.

They are a blessing. But why restrict it to acoustic, and use the word "real" in front of acoustic? (As if only an acoustic instrument has ontological status).

Arranger keyboards are a stimulating instrument - and in children might encourage an interest in composing, arranging, improvising, recording, etc. That doesn't mean it can replace the value of a clarinet, drum set or piano, but neither can the clarinet, drum set and piano necessarily replace what you can do with an arranger keyboard.
Originally Posted by clothearednincompo
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
[...] the Casio CDP S350 might be quite a good option. [...] (However its action for the piano is inferior compared to the PX S1000).


Aren't they mechanically identical?

And PX-S is "smart". Though I still don't know what's "smart" about it.

When I compared them, the action on the CDP S350 "felt" significantly different to the PX S1000.

I played them side by side in the shop, and I really preferred the action on the PX S1000.

I originally intended to buy the CDP S350, but I changed my mind after playing them side by side in the shop, and went with the PX S1000 instead.

That said, if they are mechanically the same, then interestingly it must have been something else which made me perceive them as being different.

The CDP S350 would also be great for a child in my opinion and it is really cheap.
Posted By: JoeT Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 08:26 PM
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
Originally Posted by JoeT
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music.


Nothing develops hearing and musical gifts better than a real acoustic instrument. Doesn't have to be a piano though, there are less expensive options, that are just as good.

They are a blessing. But why restrict it to acoustic, and use the word "real" in front of acoustic? (As if only an acoustic instrument has ontological status).


Real acoustic instruments create unique sounds, even when played badly. (Not only talking about acoustic keyboard instruments, which are already pretty limited in the way that sound can be controlled.)

OTOH arranger keyboards just play back prerecorded samples and pre-made accompaniments. That's of course awesome for impressing adults, but it's not really what a child needs.
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

That said, if they are mechanically the same (?) ...


They are. smile

Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

... then that would be quite interesting that they managed to make them feel quite different.


I notice a similar effect when I play my PX-160 through various voices on PianoTeq, so it's not surprising to me that they genuinely felt different when you tried them out.
Posted By: dmd Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 08:45 PM
If I were choosing an instrument for my 6-year old to learn with, I would give the most weight to the one her teacher suggested..... the Yamaha P-45.

Instead of wading through countless options with countless pros and cons …..

Her teacher suggested theYamaha P-45 for a reason, it was not just a wild guess.

Curious ? You may wish to ask her teacher why she/he suggested the Yamaha P-45.

My guess is that the reason will be … because the Yamaha P-45 will enable her to stay focused on learning her lessons and not stray off into some "play time" tangent instead.

Just a thought.



Posted By: Burkey Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 08:58 PM
Originally Posted by dmd

My guess is that the reason will be … because the Yamaha P-45 will enable her to stay focused on learning her lessons and not stray off into some "play time" tangent instead.

The Roland FP-10 is also good for discouraging going off on a tangent - it only has a couple of buttons.

Also given that the FP-10 has only been out for less that a year so there is a high likelihood that the teacher is not aware it even exists, or has not played on it themselves.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/14/20 09:20 PM
The Casio PX S series actions has the misfortune of a short pivot length design, thus the force required to depress a key becomes much heavier the further back into the keys one plays. I didn't notice it at first, and I can play it, but after about 15 minutes its fatiguing and thus discouraging. It's far more exaggerated than on a real Steinway, Yamaha, or Baldwin acoustic piano which have substantially longer pivot distances, thus more efficient leverage.
PX S series is not a recommended action, imo.
For a different suggestion than the usual ones you’ve read here so far, see if you can find a Casio CGP-700 used and in good shape. Lots of versatility for the tech savvy generation, lots of fun sounds, and a speaker system that isn’t a weak-kneed afterthought:

https://www.pianobuyer.com/article/review-casio-cgp-700-and-privia-px-560/
Apologies for going offtopic:
Originally Posted by JoeT
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
Originally Posted by JoeT
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music.


Nothing develops hearing and musical gifts better than a real acoustic instrument. Doesn't have to be a piano though, there are less expensive options, that are just as good.

They are a blessing. But why restrict it to acoustic, and use the word "real" in front of acoustic? (As if only an acoustic instrument has ontological status).


Real acoustic instruments create unique sounds, even when played badly. (Not only talking about acoustic keyboard instruments, which are already pretty limited in the way that sound can be controlled.)

OTOH arranger keyboards just play back prerecorded samples and pre-made accompaniments. That's of course awesome for impressing adults, but it's not really what a child needs.

I haven't had a keyboard for years. However, when I had a keyboard and I was 14-15, I would already make all the layers myself e.g. record my own drum track, my own walking bass, my own comping piano, my own "saxophone" improvisation.

When you play and combine all the instruments in the band yourself, it's one of the quickest and most fun (and least demanding) ways to understand concepts from music theory. You don't need to explain to a child about the need for writing rootless voicings on the piano, when they made the walking bass track themselves which included the roots.

As for auto-accompaniments - in my opinion these themselves can be very good training for young students, as they function as both a metronome and they teach simple harmonic changes. So children who play with the auto accompaniment should be developing a good sense of pulse, the same as if they were using a metronome with their practice.
Posted By: camperbc Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/15/20 01:05 AM
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
I haven't had a keyboard for years. However, when I had a keyboard and I was 14-15, I would already make all the layers myself e.g. record my own drum track, my own walking bass, my own comping piano, my own "saxophone" improvisation.

When you play and combine all the instruments in the band yourself, it's one of the quickest and most fun (and least demanding) ways to understand concepts from music theory. You don't need to explain to a child about the need for writing rootless voicings on the piano, when they made the walking bass track themselves which included the roots.

As for auto-accompaniments - in my opinion these themselves can be very good training for young students, as they function as both a metronome and they teach simple harmonic changes. So children who play with the auto accompaniment should be developing a good sense of pulse, the same as if they were using a metronome with their practice.

I completely agree with you, 3am_stargazing. I was about to type out the same sort of reply, in fact almost word for word, so you saved me the effort, thanks!
Posted By: RinTin Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/15/20 01:12 AM
Folks, she's 6 years old. And the OP hasn't posted in this thread since he started it.
Posted By: dmd Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/15/20 03:09 AM
Originally Posted by rintincop
Folks, she's 6 years old. And the OP hasn't posted in this thread since he started it.


Well, you are partly correct ….. he posted again at 9:14 this morning.

However, it is worth repeating for those who may have missed it …. she is 6 years old ….. get a grip.
Posted By: ugafert Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/15/20 10:31 AM
Haha, you make me all smile. Sorry but I am in London and the time difference cut me off, also left my laptop at work so sorry for the delay in my reply. I can see how passionate you all are about pianos/keyboards etc which is great and exactly the reason why I have posted in the first place. My daughter has played recorder for 2 years now and although she is only 6 years old, she is playing with 9-10 year olds as she is quite advanced and loves it. Equally, she only started playing the piano a few weeks back but is already playing with both hands. So while I dont know if thats a good sign or not, she is enjoying it and we want to give her a base to explore how far she wants to go. Some of your comments are a bit to technical for me, sorry, but I understand that there is a big difference in some of the models, otherwise there would not be so many. Her teacher recommended the Yamaha because she learnt on it but she also has a proper piano in the house so more than one to choose from. Now the casio appealed to us as it sparked excitement in her to have some background music going etc. I have been offered a px 750 for about £350 which might be a good price? I have just read one review that the keys are not weighted which would be a showstopper as I want her to play on a realistic instrument. Sorry to be such a pain! Thanks for all your help, will look into the Kawai and Roland models too. Thanks
Originally Posted by ugafert
Haha, you make me all smile. Sorry but I am in London and the time difference cut me off, also left my laptop at work so sorry for the delay in my reply. I can see how passionate you all are about pianos/keyboards etc which is great and exactly the reason why I have posted in the first place. My daughter has played recorder for 2 years now and although she is only 6 years old, she is playing with 9-10 year olds as she is quite advanced and loves it. Equally, she only started playing the piano a few weeks back but is already playing with both hands. So while I dont know if thats a good sign or not, she is enjoying it and we want to give her a base to explore how far she wants to go. Some of your comments are a bit to technical for me, sorry, but I understand that there is a big difference in some of the models, otherwise there would not be so many. Her teacher recommended the Yamaha because she learnt on it but she also has a proper piano in the house so more than one to choose from. Now the casio appealed to us as it sparked excitement in her to have some background music going etc. I have been offered a px 750 for about £350 which might be a good price? I have just read one review that the keys are not weighted which would be a showstopper as I want her to play on a realistic instrument. Sorry to be such a pain! Thanks for all your help, will look into the Kawai and Roland models too. Thanks

1. Personally, I would recommend buying new for this budget price range. As digital pianos are subject to wear and have a shorter lifespan (they are more like disposable consumer electronics, than acoustic pianos). The newer models are also often improving to some extent every few years. There's also a limited manufacturer's warranty. The warranty expires after 3 years for Casio in the UK.

2. I recommend trying in a shop showroom, but then buying from an online retailer like Rimmers which has really cheap prices. Rimmers has quite bad communication and mixed reviews online (they don't really message you when you order from them), but I had a good experience buying from them in the sense my digital piano arrived a day after I ordered it in perfect condition. You can also compare with other online retailers - some have better reviews and prices than others. For example, Gear4music has good reviews, while Andertons has bad reviews.

3. PX 750 seems to be an older and discontinued model, so £350 seems to be too expensive for an older model. Because you can buy the new model (PX 760) for just £150 more.

3. In the £400- £550 range (including furniture stands), there's still a lot of options with weighted keys.

The new version of the Casio you were offered (the Casio PX 760) is £500.

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-privia-px760-digital-piano-black-p21722

If you want more of a "bells and whistles" arranger keyboard, the Casio CDP S350 (plus furniture stand) is £450.

https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/casio-cdps350-ultra-compact-digital-piano-stand-package-p43407

You can scroll through other options in this price range:
https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/pianos-c3/digital-pianos-inc-portable-pianos-c10#page3:sort3

The Kawai ES 110 is £454. But with the Kawai furniture stand (which you would have to buy separately) it would be around £540 total.
https://www.rimmersmusic.co.uk/kawai-es-110-portable-piano-white-p37859
Posted By: akc42 Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/16/20 06:27 PM
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
[
Perhaps for a 6 year old (or even any age), "fooling around" with fun things on the keyboard, is not always such a bad idea. It is training their ears and possibly sparking their creativity and interest in music.


A year ago when my grandsons were 5 and 7 respectively, I bought a Yamaha NP32 in introduced them to the piano with Piano Marvel (www.pianomarvel.com). They loved it - in fact so much so that the 7 (now 8) year old has been taking lessons for a year and is preparing for his grade 1 exam.

I did sell the Yamaha NP32 and bought a Yamaha P45 for myself so I could practice in holiday. If I were to do it again I would by the P45 initially (it has 88 properly weighted keys and is about £100 cheaper than the Roland FP10 and Yamaha 121 and Kawai ES110) - but still introduce my grandsons to Piano Marvel.

The really nice thing about piano marvel is that it teaches the children the things they need to learn as a piano student - yet its packaged like a video game so that want to "practice" over and over again to score 100%. The 5 year old had an hours session and the 7 year old had a 3 hours session the first time and neither wanted to stop. So at the basics it covers note lengths and rhythms and moves on the scales and chords and ear training - but also includes simple pieces to learn that get progressively harder as you get more advanced. I myself had to learn Bach's Prelude in C last year and am now trying to learn a bit of Mozarts Eine Kliene Nachtmusik at level 6.
Posted By: Jasper E. Re: Casio keyboard for my daughter (HELP) - 01/17/20 09:43 PM
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

If you want more of a "bells and whistles" arranger keyboard, the Casio CDP S350 (plus furniture stand) is £450.


To be honest, for a child where the future usage is open, I would not recommend going for the CDP line because the PX (and AP) line has much better key action.

Among the PX series I would recommend models from year 2012 -- typically the x50, x60, x70 models but there are some new exceptions.

It can be a wise decision to buy a used digital piano when the piano is originally at least a category better at least and not a fossil, and as long as it is really in a good condition.
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