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Posted By: pianoloverus Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 12:57 AM
I am not in any sense a jazz pianist but for the last ten years I've played almost exclusively note for note transcriptions of jazz pianists that I've found on many different sites.

My favorite players of jazz ballads(in no special order) are Keith Jarrett, Bill Evans, Fred Hersch, Dave Grusin, and George Shearing. I've played at least four ballads by each of those pianists.

I am curious to find out from those of you who know a lot more about jazz than me:
1. How would your list of the greatest players of jazz ballads compare to my list?
2. Can you describe in not too technical terms what you see as the similarities or differences between the playing of the pianists on my list? How would you describe their ballad playing?

Thanks!
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 06:55 AM
Yes, this is a great list of pianists that I join - except for Dave Grusin, who lost touch on acoustic piano in favor of electronic keyboards. Already listening to the GRP All-Star Big Band recordings, I noticed the terrible "glass" sound of the piano, with whom is impossible to play ballads.
Keith Jarrett was without a doubt the greatest balladist among pianists. He taught himself to vocalize the melodic line by imitating the phrasing of singers; which reminded the story of Anton Rubinstein, who imitated the great Adeline Patti bel canto on the piano.
However, the piano is not the leading instrument in the performance of ballads, but the wind instruments that are closer to the human voice: the saxophone and trumpet. Clifford Brown was the greater ballad trumpet player https://indianapublicmedia.org/afterglow/ballads-by-brownie.php , Coleman Hawkins and John Coltrane among saxophonists .
The analysis of the ballad specifics of the performance will come later.
Posted By: Simon_b Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 08:22 AM
Hi

Like Nahum I agree your list; these are the obvious choices, except Grusin, who I like, but have never heard play ballads.

I'd add Oscar Peterson. Not an obvious choice, given his reputation for virtuoso fireworks, but he was a great ballad player. You hear this best on some of his solo albums where his voicings and touch are wonderful.

Cheating, I'd add Nat King Cole from the After Midnight sessions, where he sang and played. It doesn't get much better than that.

As far as non Pianists go Ben Webster on Tenor Sax, would be my favourite.

Cheers
Posted By: pianoloverus Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 10:28 AM
One more I thought of that I like a lot for jazz ballads is Bill Charlap. Any opinions on his ballad playing?

For Dave Grusin, I have only heard his acoustic piano recordings. Here are three I like a lot and have played(Se Fue, Spartacus Love Theme, On Golden Pond):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-K7kKJ7IIog
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqIVHM-nvPw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QF6zx09a3TU

For Fred Hersch, I've played his versions of I'll Be Seeing You, And So It Goes, The Nearness of You, No One Is Alone.

Can anyone try to describe the styles of these ballad players? I am very interested in how a knowledgeable jazz pianist would describe them.
Posted By: KlinkKlonk Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 12:42 PM
Marian McPartland - Check out her radio show. She occasionally plays a solo ballad, like in this interview with Mulgrew Miller. "There will be other times" timestamp 24:42
Posted By: jjo Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 01:11 PM
I would describe Jarrett, Evans, Hersch and Charlap as lyrical players with great touch. I think they all have classical training. I would contrast that with Beboppers, like Bud Powell, or bluesy, hard swingers like Wynton Kelly, or percussive more rhythmically oriented players like Chick Corea.
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 04:28 PM
Bill Harlap is a fine example of a well-balanced post-Evans jazz pianist (Bill Evans was the first in the dynasty), but his greatest strengths are sound and arrangement. However, he is neither an innovator nor a composer; how it differs from other pianists on the list.
The strong point of D. Grusin is his arrangement. Maybe tosomeone is enough.
Coltrane's priority as the most eminent jazz ballader is not the result of my own whim , but the spontaneous conclusion of a systematic comparison of 12 eminent saxophonists. It was only when I made a CD with a compilation of the performance of the ballads by Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Johnny Hodges, Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, Stanley Turrentine, Sonny Rollins and more, plus Coltrane, that he suddenly rises above everyone mentioned as a giant.

It all starts with sound; and the sound of Coltrane has a key that opens the souls of the listeners, in contrast to the sound of others directed to other parts of the personality ( and other body parts ). This quality puts Coltrane on a par with Yasha Heifetz, Vladimir Horowitz, James Galway or Hariprasad Chaurasia.
Compare two performances in the genre of " tragic ballads" : "I Remember Clifford" and "Alabama".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRA8EOR7Nm0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIZHCfAXOb0 -
Music imbued with spirituality and directed socially. Beyond any comparison with other artists in the history of jazz.
By the way, Jarrett's version of "I Remember Clifford" is fantastic, and proves the artist's sense of proportions, which forced him to exclude improvisation.
Posted By: KlinkKlonk Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 05:07 PM
Joe Henderson and Wayne Shorter plays great ballads too.
Posted By: tend to rush Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 07:02 PM
Bill Evans, Bill Charlap, Ellis Marsalis
Posted By: dpvjazz Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/26/20 07:46 PM
Pianoloverus
How would your list of the greatest players of jazz ballads compare to my list?

Here is my list in addition to the one already mention
Kenny Barron Saw Kenny play twice beautiful
John Lewis
Harold Mabern My mentor knew him and gave me some of his records
Cedar Walton Saw Cedar
Brad Mehldau
Andrew Hill Different but interesting
Michel Petrucciani Beautiful mastery of the piano
Bob James Saw Bob
Joe Zawinul Saw Joe with a thirteen piece band at the Catalina Jazz Club I also met at the same club Eldar Djangirov he was traveling with his dad because he was under age.
Hank Jones
Red Garland both Red and Hank could play ballads
Tommy Flanagan Tommy was one of the best
Erroll Garner
Earl Hines I saw and heard this guy in Phoenix in a hotel venue he had the longest fingers
Ahmad Jamal Saw Ahmad 4 times
MONK Ruby My Dear Round Midnight Monk's Mood

There are many others but this is a start
Posted By: pianoloverus Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 12:47 AM
Originally Posted by dpvjazz
Pianoloverus How would your list of the greatest players of jazz ballads compare to my list?
I haven't heard or played much or even anything by most of the pianists on your list! I played classical piano most of my life and only "play jazz" fairly recently and with the help of note for note transcriptions. I don't have a broad experience with jazz pianists. I have played Petrucianni's Besame Mucho and Mehldau's Secret Love but know very little else from those two. Besides some of the ballad players I mentioned, I've mostly played transcriptions of early jazz pianists like Johnson, Waller, and Gershwin.
Posted By: 36251 Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 03:38 AM
We can't forget:

Monk
Herbie

Bill Evans is still my first choice - three of the zillion that come to mind.

Danny Boy - trio
Goodbye
What is there to say
Posted By: dpvjazz Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 03:41 PM
‘2. Can you describe in not too technical terms what you see as the similarities or differences between the playing of the pianists on my list? How would you describe their ballad playing?

Space and lots of it. I remember Sonny Stitt playing in Phoenix and I went and saw and met him. He asked me how many beats in a whole note. Right away I said depending on the time signature 2.3 or 4.
He said no it’s a circle with a lot of space. Well I didn’t understand at the time but that’s what separates Pros from amateurs.

This was my mentor Prince Shell https://www.allanchase.com/prince-shell-in-memoriam
He played ballads better than anyone else and I have heard and I met a lot of really good musicians.
He would come to my house and play ballads on my PETROF 7’9 grand. I would lay under the piano and be transported to another dimension.

Allen Chase When I listen to his playing and writing, I’m reminded how much his music is part of me and the way I play, write, listen, and think as a musician. There are probably hundreds of people who feel the same way
There are many people who knew Prince Shell longer and better than I did and I hope they will record their thoughts about him. Lewis Nash, Tom Goodwin, Mary (Bishop) Perret, Charles Lewis, David Valdivia, John Dixon, and the late Emerson “Sleepy” Carrethers, Helen “Lady J” Jones, John “School” Porter, and Dave Cook, and probably many people I am forgetting or didn’t know, were all friends, as were his DuSable classmates and Chicago, Tennessee State, Navy, Air Force, and other bandmates.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSFhONYqaJ9_YFHYuilXBCw/videos?view_as=subscriber
Posted By: ˆTomLCˆ Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 05:00 PM
No mention of this guy? https://youtu.be/KKVOytNRAx4

Or this young lady? https://youtu.be/FZbGnevBx8g

and the great: https://youtu.be/-aiwpxtszwk

All quite different but all great.
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 07:10 PM
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
2. Can you describe in not too technical terms what you see as the similarities or differences between the playing of the pianists on my list? How would you describe their ballad playing?

Thanks!

Not everyone who performs ballads is a great master of their performance; and it doesn't matter what his name is.
To understand the performance of ballads, one should dive deep into sound matter. In other words: listen, listen and listen; starting at the level of individual notes!

https://yadi.sk/d/dJS9uJlxE8VA9w

1. Keith Jarrett has the longest sustain among jazz pianists. His single sound is like a long sausage that he cuts into slices; and in each slice we feel the source of the long sausage. It is necessary to listen to its sound in its entire length: from attack to complete disappearance.

2. The next listening object is the connection of two sounds. This is the cardinal foundation of the melody vocalization technique on the piano.
When connecting two notes, one should pay attention to
the ratio of the dynamics of both attacks, as well as the ratio of the second attack and the corresponding point of decay of the first note's sustain.

3. Short motives of 3-6 notes. Notice how the touch changes on each of the 5 notes; how the dynamics are changing; how agogic is created - small changes in rhythmic tendencies and in the duration of adjacent notes. .

4. A phrase of 2 and a half bars. In addition to the above qualities, notice the melodic wave reaching its climax, and then powerlessly and sadly falls down.
For more clarity in the melody, everything is presented in slow motion as well.

Under this key, you can understand who is who, and why.
Posted By: Dfrankjazz Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/27/20 07:46 PM
Beautiful post, thank you Nahum.
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 06:19 AM
Thanks ,Dfrankjazz !

I forgot to mention a few things.

-Billy Strayhorn and young Herbie Hancock should be added to the pianists' list.
- To the mentioned qualities of sound production should be added the mastery of the timbre palette.
Posted By: Rhodes74 Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 07:53 AM
Originally Posted by Nahum
- To the mentioned qualities of sound production should be added the mastery of the timbre palette.

So true and necessary but for me just half the story!

If you describe the quality of voice and articulation i want to add the art of storytelling and building an enormous arc of suspense. There are many musicians (or actors) who can shape a line beautifully but lack the power and creativity for the long run.

In my opinion that really separates the masters.

-Rhodes74
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 08:27 AM
Originally Posted by Rhodes74
- There are many musicians (or actors) who can shape a line beautifully but lack the power and creativity for the long run.
Can you elaborate this in more detail? Especially in the light of the fact that K. Jarrett in this example only sets out a piece, does not improvise at all .
Posted By: Rhodes74 Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 09:19 AM
No contradiction!

I heard your montage and found it spot on. But quite certainly the magic does not stop here.

You showed the beauty of the voice, and i wanted to add the importance of soul and intellect(!) for a real great narrator. This is relatively rare and can be be really immersive for the listener.
Keith Jarrett is one of the best examples.

On the other hand i heard many musicians who are technically brilliant but kind of span their ideas over 4 bars.

(I won't give examples for that)


-Rhodes74
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 09:43 AM
Originally Posted by Rhodes74
You showed the beauty of the voice, and i wanted to add the importance of soul and intellect(!) for a real great narrator. This is relatively rare and can be be really immersive for the listener.
By default, here we are discussing live performers, not robots that accurately reproduce the given parameters.
Posted By: Rhodes74 Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 10:22 AM
yes, and is it not the reason we are seeing such a variety of personalities?

-Rhodes74
Posted By: indigo_dave Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 01:10 PM
Originally Posted by Simon_b
Hi

Like Nahum I agree your list; these are the obvious choices, except Grusin, who I like, but have never heard play ballads.

I'd add Oscar Peterson. Not an obvious choice, given his reputation for virtuoso fireworks, but he was a great ballad player. You hear this best on some of his solo albums where his voicings and touch are wonderful.

Cheating, I'd add Nat King Cole from the After Midnight sessions, where he sang and played. It doesn't get much better than that.

As far as non Pianists go Ben Webster on Tenor Sax, would be my favourite.

Cheers

Simon, we have some parallel preferences. I've heard some Ben Webster ballad playing that make me tend to agree. I'll throw in Johnny Hodges. IIRC Duke had a nickname "Rabbit" for Hodges. For me it's that darting phrasing with little starts and stops, like a rabbit or other rodent.

Also, ironically, I was listening to the Nat King Cole After Midnight Sessions just last week.

I'm going to submit Duke Ellington to add to Nahum's Billy Strayhorn. Duke, like Billy, didn't play a lot of extended single line melodies in his improv. He often filled with descending arpeggios and rhythmic punctuating jabs. I figure is was a consequence of playing with a big band where single lines wouldn't cut thru.

And of course, Keith Jarrett. I've often enjoyed listening to Keith's melodic fills at the end of a phrase.
Posted By: emenelton Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/28/20 02:03 PM
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I'll throw in Johnny Hodges. IIRC Duke had a nickname "Rabbit" for Hodges. For me it's that darting phrasing with little starts and stops, like a rabbit or other rodent

I don’t think rodent is the same either metaphorically or literally.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 12:30 AM
I have a good chart for this original ballad by Monty Alexander
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 01:55 AM
I have this ballad chart too.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 01:59 AM
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 02:02 AM
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 02:03 AM
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 10:03 AM
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
2. Can you describe in not too technical terms what you see as the similarities or differences between the playing of the pianists on my list? How would you describe their ballad playing?

Thanks!
These worthy questions deserve clear answers in the field of pianism and performance. Performance philosophy questions are interesting in themselves, but they are a separate topic.

Old Folks


1. Keith Jarrett's version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeuaiuUBBFI


Ernestine Anderson with Monty Alexander - my favorite vocal version ; can't hear it without tears!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MvAPEwK02I


3.Monty Alexander's version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuyHSLFU3ms


1.It also introduces Jarrett's typical concept of intro-theme-improvisation-theme- outro = interlude ; as well as the above mentioned qualities of performance of the theme. Here 100% of the focus is on the melody, including variation; but without any remplissage; while the left hand is correctly accompanying. Every note is functional!
I read somewhere that Jarrett had a period when he worked exclusively on the performance of naked melodies. He even copied a specific vocal performance with all the peculiarities; e.g. Peggy Lee's with George Shearing version of Don't Ever Leave Me in album The Melody At Night, With You .
About improvisation, I can only say that it is based on motivic development (as opposed to variation), which turns the performances of K.J. in one long, continuous (thanks to the brilliant rhythm section) line - from the first to the last note. The division into choruses is abolished. It's like the idea of ​​a long sustain of a single sound, transferred to the concept of playing the whole piece from the very first to the very last note, where pauses, sometimes long ones, are just as functional as the notes.


2.Here Monty Alexander is undoubtedly influenced by both the singer and the version of Jarrett that appeared 2 years earlier. Throw in the Fender Piano with its long sustain, and you have fantastic accompaniment - every vocalist's dream, and a masterpiece of improvisation, especially at the beginning. Unfortunately, further there is a confrontation between dynamic development and the tendency to brilliant remplissage , which is not always logically justified .
Posted By: indigo_dave Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 12:38 PM
Originally Posted by emenelton
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I'll throw in Johnny Hodges. IIRC Duke had a nickname "Rabbit" for Hodges. For me it's that darting phrasing with little starts and stops, like a rabbit or other rodent

I don’t think rodent is the same either metaphorically or literally.

I googled it. Reportedly Duke said Hodges looked like a rabbit when he played. I still think of his playing like a rabbit - hopping and darting around, then stopping for a moment or two, then darting around. Duke also reportedly sometimes called Hodges "Jeep".
Posted By: emenelton Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 03:30 PM
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
Originally Posted by emenelton
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I'll throw in Johnny Hodges. IIRC Duke had a nickname "Rabbit" for Hodges. For me it's that darting phrasing with little starts and stops, like a rabbit or other rodent

I don’t think rodent is the same either metaphorically or literally.

I googled it. Reportedly Duke said Hodges looked like a rabbit when he played. I still think of his playing like a rabbit - hopping and darting around, then stopping for a moment or two, then darting around. Duke also reportedly sometimes called Hodges "Jeep".

just taking exception to your equivocation of 'a rabbit' with 'other rodent'

If a band leader called you a rabbit because of your playing, it probably would cause a few raised eyebrows and a grin; calling you a rodent however is not good in any way and finally, rabbits are not rodents.
Posted By: indigo_dave Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 03:59 PM
Originally Posted by emenelton
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
Originally Posted by emenelton
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I'll throw in Johnny Hodges. IIRC Duke had a nickname "Rabbit" for Hodges. For me it's that darting phrasing with little starts and stops, like a rabbit or other rodent

I don’t think rodent is the same either metaphorically or literally.

I googled it. Reportedly Duke said Hodges looked like a rabbit when he played. I still think of his playing like a rabbit - hopping and darting around, then stopping for a moment or two, then darting around. Duke also reportedly sometimes called Hodges "Jeep".

just taking exception to your equivocation of 'a rabbit' with 'other rodent'

If a band leader called you a rabbit because of your playing, it probably would cause a few raised eyebrows and a grin; calling you a rodent however is not good in any way and finally, rabbits are not rodents.

I stand corrected. I thought I'd read that rabbits were rodents. I was really thinking more of the behavior. I watch squirrels in my front yard thru the window while playing piano. I saw a chipmunk video recently and observed that behavior.

Back to music. I love the stories around Ellington and the human ecosystem he enabled (another potential language dispute ? ). I read someplace long ago that on occasion when Hodges played something exceptionally well or inventively, he would rub his thumb and index finger together, signaling to Duke he deserved a tip. And sometimes Duke would tip him.
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 04:11 PM
The concept of performing a ballad has repeatedly changed in the history of jazz: first it was a blues ballad (St. James Infirmary), then a dancing slow fox, which turned into a slow swing; and only in the late 50s, in the concepts of Bill Evans and Miles, the ballad took shape as what is familiar to us today (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVJ5jgZU6gU).
At the same time, two points should be noted: the solo pianistic style of the ballad proceeded, and still proceeds from Chopin's prelude technique; and also, K. Jarrett pushed ballad performance much further than Bill Evans, changing the traditional 4/4 = 12/8 feeling to 8/8, which changed the sense of swing in the ballad, and required new types of techniques .KJ is a resolutely innovator of jazz pianism, and just during the period of his "Standards" series !
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 07:47 PM
Bill Evans was apparently the first to use in ballads highlighting soprano of LH chords on every beat - unlike Erroll Garner . K. Jarrett developed this transparent rhythmic effect by shifting repetition from soprano to other chords voices.

3.Monty Alexander's concept is different: he tightly fills all the pauses of the theme with passages and remplissages ; not allowing the rhythm section to be an equal partner.
It's pity- sometimes he just doesn't give the melody a chance to breathe.I would put it this way: he has a wonderful motivic thinking, in which passages a la Peterson interfere. He has so many ideas , unlike others , that he should have limited himself.
Posted By: emenelton Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 08:13 PM
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
I stand corrected. I thought I'd read that rabbits were rodents.

I read someplace long ago that on occasion when Hodges played something exceptionally well or inventively, he would rub his thumb and index finger together, signaling to Duke he deserved a tip. And sometimes Duke would tip him.




Thank-you Mr Indigo!
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 11:10 PM
Ballads and rabbits? I don’t know much about that.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 11:19 PM
Yeah Monty sometimes has more technique than he knows what to do with, he often is guilty of too many notes as is Peterson He is also inconsistent in quality, but that is par for the course with many improvisers and I accept it. But somehow I prefer his musical character. Evans and Jarret could never play “Feelings” like Monty does in the video above. “ Montreux Alexander” is my all time favorite jazz piano trio album. When I’m dying that’s what I want to listen to. Monty has a different sounding soulfulness, more bluesy, more busy, more show-ey, than the other two men. I’d rather listen to Monty than many of the greats (Monk, McCoy, Corea) and that sounds sacrilegious but that’s me. I prefer him to Peterson too, although Peterson is s greater pianist and musician.
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/29/20 11:20 PM
Originally Posted by Nahum
Bill Evans was apparently the first to use in ballads highlighting soprano of LH chords on every beat - unlike Erroll Garner . K. Jarrett developed this transparent rhythmic effect by shifting repetition from soprano to other chords voices.
That sounds intriguing but I don’t understand what you wrote.
Posted By: Nahum Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/30/20 06:39 AM
Originally Posted by RinTin
I’d rather listen to Monty than many of the greats (Monk, McCoy, Corea) and that sounds sacrilegious but that’s me.
I agree. I wanted to mention McCoy: he runs from long melodic notes, unless it's an octave tremolo. It's clear why - his sound without pedal includes a short sustain.



Originally Posted by RinTin
That sounds intriguing but I don’t understand what you wrote.

I fell into a little despair!

[Linked Image]
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/30/20 07:58 PM
Dear Nahum,

Thank you for that, it's always great to see what's happening. I hadn't noticed Evans playing repeated quarter note rhythms in the top voice of the left hand with his trios. Any recommendations on particular tracks where he does this? Or is it found in his solo piano playing? It seems to me that all quarter notes emphasize the pulse, I do it with the Bud Powell shells sometimes and call it beating the thumb (softly of course) particularly when playing solo piano. It lays down a 4 to the bar feel. I am aware of Evans playing lots of little "inner melodies" in the top voice of his left hand with quarters and eights mixed, but all quarters I hadn't really observed before. And of course Jarrett played lots of little inner melodies in his solo piano ballads too.
Barry Harris, whom I have studied for decades, also explores a lot of inner voice movements in his left hand.

Thanks
RinTin
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/30/20 10:19 PM
Hiromi plays ballads like this sometimes, the melody is played with the 5th finger, the sixteenths adapt to the harmony. Arpeggios in a harp like manner, similarity to the Bach Prelude No. 1 WTC. I have integrated this style among others into my solo ballad playing on tunes such as Polka Dots and Moonbeams, Smoke Get's In Your Eyes, Easy Living, etc.

The last measure shows how the eighth notes are woven into the texture

[Linked Image]
Posted By: RinTin Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/30/20 10:31 PM
Then during the improvisation section Hiromi plays "tresillo " rhythm pattern in the left hand with very basic 1 5 10 voicings. It reminds of Ravel Concerto in G slow movement but in tresillo rhythm, especially when she repeats each single note in the RH improv like he did.


[Linked Image]
Posted By: pianoloverus Re: Great jazz ballad players - 10/30/20 10:53 PM
As a non jazz pianist who only plays note for note transcriptions of jazz pianists, I unfortunately don't understand a fair amount of the discussion on this thread. But I am still transfixed by the beauty of many jazz performances! Here are a few of the ones that I love and have played. I'm interested in other posters' reactions to these pieces.

Jarrett Over the Rainbow(Tokyo '84, by far my favorite of his many performances of this piece);
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK8gJjsQdVU

Fred Hersch:The Nearness of You
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ON7kJ10BRZE

Shearing:In the Still of the Night
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2Hrkh5-dx4

Bill Evans:Lucky to be Me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o31HMrCEg-k

Brad Mehldau:Secret Love
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhWjvATgJCk

Dave Grusin:Se Fue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-K7kKJ7IIog
Posted By: dpvjazz Re: Great jazz ballad players - 11/02/20 05:20 PM
I really liked Bill and Keith anything those two play I like. Jarrett's over the rainbow is fantastic Brad is refreshing and I have seen Fred a couple of times perform and it was good. Bill is still my favorite and I know it wasn't a ballad but his playing on Green Dolphin Street was a chordal master piece. .Webster 2 : relating to music characterized more by harmony than by counterpoint. Maybe NAHUM or Dave F can give us a harmonic break down of what Bill was playing. Here a couple of links to my mentor Prince Shell who influence a lot musicians here in Phoenix. COME IN FROM THE RAIN and STAIRWAY TO THE STARS

https://youtu.be/pBMogiemxA0

https://youtu.be/lf2-cBGGmY4
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