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Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Book

Posted By: tim1987

Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Book - 06/18/10 03:17 PM

Has anyone got this book by Bill Dobbins which is a transcription of the first 5 songs from Chick's ECM solo record? It's from 1971 which has some lovely creative, melodic lines and great playing. Highly recommended!

I especially like Noon Song and Song for Sally which actually later became known as Sea Journey. I need to work on my co-ordination for playing the right hand lines over that l/h vamp.

Some links: Piano Improvisations Transcription by Bill Dobbins

Noon Song

Song for Sally
Posted By: davefrank

Re: Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Book - 06/18/10 05:33 PM

yes, this book is great! Great piano playing.

Dave Frank
Posted By: charleslang

Re: Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Book - 06/18/10 11:11 PM

Fun to compare these to Jarrett in the same era. "Sometime Ago" has some of the same licks I remember from some Jarrett, but it's more steady in rhythm, even though it does got a lot of rubato.
Posted By: Dave Ferris

Re: Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Boo - 06/19/10 03:33 AM

You can bet if it has Bill Dobbin's name listed as author, it's as close as you can come to 100% accurate. Bill's ears are a freak of nature, from Uranus or something. laugh

I personally don't have that particular book but I do have his transcriptions of "Now he sings, now he sobs". Also the Herbie Hancock book. If you follow along with the record it's scary accurate.
Posted By: tim1987

Re: Chick Corea Piano Improvisations Vol 1 Transcription Book - 06/20/10 07:31 AM

Bill must have a insane ear to be able to transcribe them pieces! Not just the voicings, but also attempting to accurately transcribe the rhythms. Though I haven't tried every song, they seem to be very, very accurate.

This book is also great to see the application of quartal voicings as well which really gives Chick that signature sound, as well as his percussive touch.

Just one theory question about double flats. I've read that the point of double flats is in relation to the progression of the harmony and relationship to the chord.

So in bar 5 of "Ballad for Anna" there is a chord that sounds and looks like a A maj 7+5. But the notation has the root as a B double flat. Is the reason partly because it's in Eb Minor with 6 flats, so there is no such thing as an A and also it's relationship to the harmonic progression? I just can't get my head round he doesn't just say A natural.

There are other examples in "Song of the Wind" which has some double sharps, I believe the key signature is F sharp minor with 3 sharps.
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