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JSB was a Sadist

Posted By: cmb13

JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 12:52 AM

Want proof?

Just try BWV 934, the second section. Seriously, why? And this is supposed to be among the easy ones. Little prelude. Before the Inventions. Then the Sinfonías, then the WTC, then Goldberg?

No composer makes me feel like quite the failure that he does. Sure, there are other quite hard pieces, but he has a unique way of making the ones that look easy make me feel like a total failure.

Rant over.
Posted By: Morodiene

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:47 AM

It's a part of the process. Those little preludes would be something I would have to spend a lot of time on to get it close to what I want. But I think that comes after you've moved on to the more difficult things and revisit these gems. Just take ti slow and rest in the fact that you are learning something very difficult that will get easier next time around. smile
Posted By: BruceD

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 05:10 AM

Originally Posted by cmb13
[...]
No composer makes me feel like quite the failure that he does. [...]


Welcome to the club! I've been working on a three-part fugue (from WTC - Bk I) for two weeks, and it still limps hopelessly along.

However, "sadist," in the literal sense is a bit strong, isn't it?

Regards,
Posted By: johnstaf

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 07:30 AM

It's often the case that Bach's music requires a radically different approach to playing, to the extent that it feels like learning a new instrument. As always, we can't see how playable something is until we've learned to play it.
Posted By: earlofmar

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 07:38 AM

I love and hate JSB. I have been butchering one or another of his pieces virtually since I first started. But I doubt I could give him up, that would be admitting defeat. A couple of my high points so far on my journey have included getting an Invention and now a Sinfonia to exam ready status. But no matter how hard I try, they are never quite finished and it just drives me crazy, and I suspect Bach will always do that to me.
Posted By: dumka1

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 12:36 PM

I've been working on his d minor Prelude and Fugue from WTC I off and on for months now, and while I learned the fugue pretty quickly (I even managed to submit a very slow version of it to the Bach themed recital), the supposedly "easy" prelude almost made me cry and I was very close to giving up even though I'm usually quite persistent with my piano pieces. So, I can totally relate to the sense of failure. But at some point it clicked. With Bach it seems that it's often just a matter of time and sheer repetition.
Posted By: KevinM

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:21 PM

I remember enjoying Bach as a child. Perhaps it really was just the simplest pieces. The only Bach I've learnt this time round was early, the c-major prelude and I suspect that doesn't count for comparison.

My father was big on Beethoven, Bach and Mozart. These were the composers that got his approval for learning pieces from and of these 3 I think it was Bach I enjoyed the most.

So, I can't really identify with the sadist part.

I think my teacher loses control with me a bit, I'm always taking in music I'm interested in learning so she doesn't get the chance to direct progress as she would like, perhaps she is too accommodating to my requests and would be giving me bach to pieces to play if she had a chance.

Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:26 PM

Well, I'm pressing on. I figure, a Little Prelude every few weeks, then the Inventions. I do think it's a matter of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger". I think it will help in the end. His method of chord transitions and absolute hand independence has to be good for us!

Additionally, I should modify the opening statement to indicate he was a "brilliant sadist". There's no denying the complexity and the innovation of his work. And the fact is I absolutely love some of them. To this day, I'm using the WTC Prelude in C as a warm up every day, and I hope to find another one or two to use like that, not to mention my love affair with the Adagio, BWV 974.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:29 PM

Agree w all of the above, Bruce, you're probably right, but after deciding he was intentionally mocking me, those were the first words that came out of my mouth (in all fairness, there was an expletive thrown in for good measure, but I felt the better part of valor was to eliminate that in the title of the thread wink ).

Morodiene, I always love your words of encouragement, and I'm going to press on as above!!
Posted By: bSharp(C)yclist

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:36 PM

I'm working on Invention #8 now. It's fun smile
Posted By: KevinM

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 01:47 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13

Additionally, I should modify the opening statement to indicate he was a "brilliant sadist". There's no denying the complexity and the innovation of his work. And the fact is I absolutely love some of them. To this day, I'm using the WTC Prelude in C as a warm up every day, and I hope to find another one or two to use like that, not to mention my love affair with the Adagio, BWV 974.


Thanks for that, I know I've heard BWV 974 before, but I thought I must listen to what Craig loves so now I have a name for it. I understand your love affair.
Posted By: Dr. Rogers

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 02:42 PM

cmb13, my good doctor, what problems are you having with this prelude in particular?

Here are a few suggestions, probably worth what they cost you (and which I'm sure you already do):

  • This prelude (and nearly all of Bach's keyboard music) requires independence of hands. Not as much as a fugue, of course, but you have to work up to that.
  • How well can you play it hands separately? Even if you can play it fairly well hands separately, you will probably benefit from further hands separate practice. (There is nothing shameful or demeaning about hands separate practice. Personally, I continue to do occasional hands separate practice even after I have a piece pretty well mastered.)
  • Practice slowly. S.l.o.w.l.y. SSSSlllloooowwwllllyyyy. Occasional try it closer to performance tempo just to see how you're coming along, but this should be occasional. (I find I make very fast progress on pieces when I force myself to practice in a slow, disciplined manner.)
  • Practice using the blocking (divide and conquer) method. (Balance this with playing through the piece, is practice can get terminally boring if you're just working on one small section. But only playing through will retard your progress.)


And here are some things you may not have considered:

How well do you understand the harmony? Can you identify the chord at every beat? Can you identify which notes are chord notes and which are non-chord notes? Consonances vs. dissonances? How did Bach resolve the dissonances? Can you identify the modulations? Where are the cadences, and which cadences did Bach use?

Speaking from personal experience, I tend to make better progress on a piece once I understand what's going on harmonically. I find this especially useful during memorization.

When I was a child and teenager, I hated Bach with a passion. I didn't come to love Bach until I was in my 30s... one reason I started seriously practicing piano as an adult was that I wanted to play the Well-Tempered Clavier (I played P&F in D minor from WTC II for Grade 8, and am currently working on P&F in F minor from WTC I for ARSM.)
Posted By: peterws

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 02:55 PM

I just got the Inventions; starting at the beginning which a music teacher has marked for her pupil. I bought them on ebay, used. After some weeks it's coming together. It's strange; if I try to think about what I do, things grind to a halt. If iIcharge at it, my fingers seem to go in the right places which is crucial. It is a fun exercise; seems easy until the speed increases.

Whether it stays with me remains to be seen . .
Posted By: Sidokar

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:03 PM

The little preludes title is misleading. Some of these are essentially close to the inventions. Anyway are you comfortable with the logic of the composition ? I find it helps to play. Essentially the second section is going down the circle of fifth, the left hand usually plays the skeleton of the chord and the right hand is embellishing with a few recurring patterns.
Posted By: Music Me

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:29 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Well, I'm pressing on. I figure, a Little Prelude every few weeks, then the Inventions. I do think it's a matter of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger". I think it will help in the end. His method of chord transitions and absolute hand independence has to be good for us!

Additionally, I should modify the opening statement to indicate he was a "brilliant sadist". There's no denying the complexity and the innovation of his work. And the fact is I absolutely love some of them. To this day, I'm using the WTC Prelude in C as a warm up every day, and I hope to find another one or two to use like that, not to mention my love affair with the Adagio, BWV 974.

Well, I am totally with you on this. Learning Bach when I first started felt like solving a math problem - and I hated math! However, it became a must if I wanted to learn true finger independence and really helped with sight reading. I also have a love affair with the Adagio and Invention #7.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:43 PM

Originally Posted by Music Me

Well, I am totally with you on this. Learning Bach when I first started felt like solving a math problem - and I hated math! However, it became a must if I wanted to learn true finger independence and really helped with sight reading. I also have a love affair with the Adagio and Invention #7.

Barbara, I'll have to check out that invention, esp if it's anywhere near the Adagio....
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:44 PM

Originally Posted by KevinM
Originally Posted by cmb13

Additionally, I should modify the opening statement to indicate he was a "brilliant sadist". There's no denying the complexity and the innovation of his work. And the fact is I absolutely love some of them. To this day, I'm using the WTC Prelude in C as a warm up every day, and I hope to find another one or two to use like that, not to mention my love affair with the Adagio, BWV 974.


Thanks for that, I know I've heard BWV 974 before, but I thought I must listen to what Craig loves so now I have a name for it. I understand your love affair.

Glad you like it, Kevin! I have recorded it, as has b#(C)yclist, and others, on our youtube channels, but my favorite version is still by Irena Lankova. There's a thread about this piece I can dig up if you're interested.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:51 PM

Great points above, Doc Rogers.

I do like to analyze music in the ways you've outlined, but I was really hoping to go through the Little Preludes more rapidly, one every few weeks, rather than spending a lot of time with detailed harmonic analysis. This was meant to ba side project while I study the more advanced Romantic repertoire I prefer. Maybe that's the issue...they need more TLC. That said, I have noticed and paid attention to certain chords, and I think this really does help. I haven't really analyzed the chord progression, though.

Playing the piece hands-separately is much easier, and I can do it. I agree about slow practice, maybe I should slow this one down. And you're on target - I play through it too much. I should work on just a few measures at a time, slowly, to perfection, before putting them together.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 03:54 PM

Originally Posted by Sidokar
The little preludes title is misleading. Some of these are essentially close to the inventions. Anyway are you comfortable with the logic of the composition ? I find it helps to play. Essentially the second section is going down the circle of fifth, the left hand usually plays the skeleton of the chord and the right hand is embellishing with a few recurring patterns.

Haven't notice that progression (descending circle) - will have to reexamine this one in that light.


I think it's the fact that there are finger changes in what seems to be illogical ways in nearly every measure, at different points in the measure, in each hand, that really fouls me up. I've simplified the finger changes (versus Henle's) in some spots, only to have it bite me when I realize a measure later why their fingering works better than my edit.
Posted By: MichaelJK

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 05:54 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13

I think it's the fact that there are finger changes in what seems to be illogical ways in nearly every measure, at different points in the measure, in each hand, that really fouls me up. I've simplified the finger changes (versus Henle's) in some spots, only to have it bite me when I realize a measure later why their fingering works better than my edit.


Fingering in Bach can be maddening if you don't approach it the right way. You are realizing how non-obvious the fingering is for you, which is due to the complexity of the music.

It takes time to get comfortable with this. I can assure you that it's worth putting in that time, however!

The key to all of this is learning how to untangle the complexity of the music. As an exercise, you might try the following:

- Play the left hand as written, but play only the first 3 eighth notes in the right hand in each measure
- Play the left hand as written, but play only the right hand notes which fall on the beats

I would not suggest playing hands separately in music like this.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 06:38 PM

Why would you not suggest hands separately? Seems contrary to the recommendations of others.
Posted By: Sidokar

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 06:38 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13


I think it's the fact that there are finger changes in what seems to be illogical ways in nearly every measure, at different points in the measure, in each hand, that really fouls me up. I've simplified the finger changes (versus Henle's) in some spots, only to have it bite me when I realize a measure later why their fingering works better than my edit.


Yes the left hand plays only 2 notes mainly, either a third or the 7th of the chord. For example in bar 22, there is a C-E natural, that stands for C7 as a dominant for F. The rest of the chord is in the right hand: C-E-G-B flat and you land on F on the downbeat of bar 23. Same in bar 24 there is an F and a E flat for F7, the last note of the bar has the A natural, so F-A-C-M flat, dominant of B flat in bar 25 And so on.

The right hand is really made of a few patterns, this is motivic composition: many of them are an association of 3 notes within a third + another 3 that form a triad or a 7th in opposite direction. The patterns are connected through a continuous flow by steps. So the first 8 bars (Second section) are all connected, then 4 bars of "cadence" leading to the central point of G minor (we started in E flat major relative of C minor) dominant minor of C minor and another phrase of 8 bars, 6 of which conected and 2 final cadential: D6 (IV in the bass), G, C.

So, all in all, that does not help to choose the fingering but personally when I play Bach, I think each hand as its own content, connected together through the harmonic scheme. If you know the chords well, the progress of the music becomes much more transparent so you can anticipate what is coming next.
Posted By: MichaelJK

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 06:48 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Why would you not suggest hands separately? Seems contrary to the recommendations of others.


If you find hands separate practice to be useful, then you should do it. It doesn't matter what I think.
Posted By: Henri2106

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 08:17 PM

I love BWV 934 and have been struggling with it on and off for some time. Absolutely essential to get the non-intuitive fingering just right, of course, and frustrating. But the beautiful sobriety of this piece always brings me back to try again... also love BWV 999 in the same key, that I find a lot easier to manage and really enjoy.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 08:23 PM

Originally Posted by MichaelJK
Originally Posted by cmb13
Why would you not suggest hands separately? Seems contrary to the recommendations of others.


If you find hands separate practice to be useful, then you should do it. It doesn't matter what I think.

No problem, I was just wondering why you stated that, in music like this, you feel this way. Just curious.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 08:23 PM

Great analysis, Sidocar, will have to examine it more closely when I get home later. Thanks!
Posted By: MichaelJK

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 08:48 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by MichaelJK
Originally Posted by cmb13
Why would you not suggest hands separately? Seems contrary to the recommendations of others.


If you find hands separate practice to be useful, then you should do it. It doesn't matter what I think.

No problem, I was just wondering why you stated that, in music like this, you feel this way. Just curious.


The reason I said that is because it is often very tempting to spend a lot of time practicing hands separately, and then getting frustrated when hands together doesn't seem to become any easier. I think this applies to most music, but especially with Bach, hands together is practically a different piece of music. Most of the difficulties in Bach come from the coordination of the hands, and practicing hands separately can really be more of a safety blanket.

For example, you notice a wrong note in the right hand, and so you stop and work on the right hand by itself. It seems fine, so you put the left hand back in, and the problem comes back immediately. That's because the problem was actually in the left hand, not the right hand. But, the music is so complex, it's not obvious what's causing the problems. In my opinion, it's better to tackle that complexity head on.

It's like trying to learn to drive a car by sitting in the driveway practicing your steering by itself, and then practicing the brake by itself, etc. That does work if you've correctly isolated the problems, but come on, with driving you know that the real challenges are in the coordination between all of those movements, not in the isolated movements themselves.

I'm especially saying this to you because you said that you don't have a problem playing this piece hands separate. So, separating the hands is not going to uncover any difficulties for you, merely delay them. If you did have problems playing hands separate, I might revise my answer a little bit.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 09:21 PM

Good points, thanks for the clarification. Appreciate it. I usually do play it hands together, unless I'm figuring out a section, or fingering for a section. I think going for a few measures at a time, rather than straight through, is going to be key.
Posted By: Music Me

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 10:10 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by Music Me

Well, I am totally with you on this. Learning Bach when I first started felt like solving a math problem - and I hated math! However, it became a must if I wanted to learn true finger independence and really helped with sight reading. I also have a love affair with the Adagio and Invention #7.

Barbara, I'll have to check out that invention, esp if it's anywhere near the Adagio....

I love the way Sir Andras Schiff plays it-very slow. It gives it a completely different emotion. It almost doesn't sound like Bach, if you can imagine that. Please check it out.
Posted By: MeganR

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 10:14 PM

I love Bach. I can spend hours listening to his keyboard works. I pretty much always want to have a Bach piece on the go (although at the moment I'm learning a Scarlatti sonata). I've only been playing four years so until I started working on the Little Preludes, it was really more what could be thought of as "Bach-ish" pieces, as in the Anna Magdalena Bach notebook. I think of it as working on a jigsaw puzzle, and don't really care how long it takes me once I've started on learning a piece. It's months rather than weeks.

I think my teacher would prefer I do more hand separate work, but I like to understand how it all fits together so I tend to jump in hands together so I can hear it better. I'm also what I pretty much consider a beginner on the theory side, still working on that, and I haven't analyzed chord structure as suggested above.
Posted By: Henri2106

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 10:17 PM

Eons ago I had a teacher who made me learn polyphonic pieces by singing each voice. She made me play each voice separately, then I would sing the alto voice while playing the bass with the left hand. And then, of course, she made me sing the bass line while playing the alto with the RH. When I finally put the two together with BH, I can assure you it sounded much richer than anything I could do with ‘normal’ practice. It was not easy, but I really believe dear old Marie-Agnes had it right...!
Posted By: Henri2106

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 10:24 PM

That little Scarlatti aria is very pretty and I’m sure it is quite manageable at your level. It’s actually the first piece I worked on seriously when I took up the piano again after a 25-year interruption. You can probably add in a couple of ornamentations, such as at the end of each of the two sections. Good luck!
Posted By: MichaelJK

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/16/19 11:12 PM

Originally Posted by Henri2106
Eons ago I had a teacher who made me learn polyphonic pieces by singing each voice. She made me play each voice separately, then I would sing the alto voice while playing the bass with the left hand. And then, of course, she made me sing the bass line while playing the alto with the RH. When I finally put the two together with BH, I can assure you it sounded much richer than anything I could do with ‘normal’ practice. It was not easy, but I really believe dear old Marie-Agnes had it right...!


Yes, that's a great thing to practice!

I want to clarify that what I was saying about hands together/separate is about physical coordination. It is absolutely a good idea to look at the voices individually, and in various combinations, so that you can develop your understanding of the counterpoint. In my opinion, that is not a good way to solve a fingering problem, though, because fingering is really a whole body issue, not an issue in just one voice.
Posted By: Purrblast

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/17/19 11:17 PM

I'm deep into my 12th Bach piece (BWV 926) and I must say it's same grade of heavy struggle every time. Yes, it's very rewarding once you finally can play it. But I started to treat pieces from other composers like little rests before next Bach, at the same time feeling more and more respect towards his music.

I can't help but imagine that there used to be some old, now long forgotten method of learning Bach music, that Bach followed. Since it's gone we are stuck with the slow and suboptimal route. That is till one advances to the level so high that one bruteforce-learn Bach pieces regular way.
Maybe someday someone will rediscover the old way.
Posted By: pianoloverus

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/17/19 11:55 PM

I think one good way to learn Bach pieces more quickly is to find editions with good fingerings.
Posted By: BruceD

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/18/19 12:10 AM

One caution about practicing contrapuntal works hands separately is that frequently a voice may move between the hands. The sense of that voice and its direction may be lost if practicing hands separately becomes the normal way to learn such a work.

But of course there are times when hands separate practice is helpful in learning any work.

Regards,
Posted By: Medved1

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/18/19 02:38 AM

JSB was the first "real" composer I spent time with, albeit in the form of Anna Magdalena's book, plus a couple of the inventions. I got through a prelude and fugue this summer (carefully cherry-picked the easiest I could find!). I agree with the idea that his music is a world unto itself, and harder than it looks (which is pretty hard to start with). But there's the wonderful feeling that you are getting a piano lesson from him, accross the hundreds of years.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/18/19 10:43 AM

Originally Posted by BruceD
One caution about practicing contrapuntal works hands separately is that frequently a voice may move between the hands. The sense of that voice and its direction may be lost if practicing hands separately becomes the normal way to learn such a work.

Regards,

Great point!
Posted By: WiseBuff

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/19/19 09:57 PM

I've been learning the Allemande from French Suite #4. It looks MUCH easier than it is. It's at about half tempo and the fingering is feeling more comfortable but not automatic yet. I love the French Suites but they are difficult for me.
Posted By: ebonykawai

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/20/19 12:50 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Want proof?

Just try BWV 934, the second section. Seriously, why? And this is supposed to be among the easy ones. Little prelude. Before the Inventions. Then the Sinfonías, then the WTC, then Goldberg?

No composer makes me feel like quite the failure that he does. Sure, there are other quite hard pieces, but he has a unique way of making the ones that look easy make me feel like a total failure.

Rant over.


Welcome to my world, LMAO. 😂😂😂😂😂

It's taken me since June to get his Invention #1 in hand, lol. I'm still not done with it, but hopefully the next 2 weeks should get me there. Bach is hard because your brain and fingers play 2 different melodies simultaneously, and his fingering can be tricky, though it's super important to get used to because you'll definitely need those skills with harder repertoire like, for instance, Chopin. Finger switches, or going 1-5-4-1-5-4 down the keyboard (I'm dealing with this right now, LOL) become commonplace. Great learning experience! Drives you mad at first, but you'll TOTALLY get used to it! Just keep at it, I suck all the time but it eventually works out. ❤️
Posted By: ebonykawai

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/20/19 12:58 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by BruceD
One caution about practicing contrapuntal works hands separately is that frequently a voice may move between the hands. The sense of that voice and its direction may be lost if practicing hands separately becomes the normal way to learn such a work.

Regards,

Great point!


I agree, for me it's super iimportant to get the voices down solid in my head first, rather than trying to let my fingers figure them out separately, if that makes sense. For me anyway, the better I can sing the voice with my mouth, the easier it becomes in getting the hands to find it. Listening to recordings can help, I tend to do a lot of prep work before I even start a contrapuntal piece. I slow down a lot of Youtube recordings of the great pianists playing stuff. My ears help me an awful lot in my playing.
Posted By: cmb13

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/20/19 01:53 PM

Originally Posted by ebonykawai


Welcome to my world, LMAO. 😂😂😂😂😂

It's taken me since June to get his Invention #1 in hand, lol. I'm still not done with it, but hopefully the next 2 weeks should get me there. Bach is hard because your brain and fingers play 2 different melodies simultaneously, and his fingering can be tricky, though it's super important to get used to because you'll definitely need those skills with harder repertoire like, for instance, Chopin. Finger switches, or going 1-5-4-1-5-4 down the keyboard (I'm dealing with this right now, LOL) become commonplace. Great learning experience! Drives you mad at first, but you'll TOTALLY get used to it! Just keep at it, I suck all the time but it eventually works out. ❤️

Ha! Deja vu! Reminds me of your Famous Quotation! I decided to take Bach more seriously, felt it would be good for me (like icky medicine), so here I am!
Posted By: akc42

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/20/19 06:27 PM

I am doing a second time round on Bach's Invention 13. Including today's lessons, I've spent 3 weeks learning about Chords and Chord Progressions and Jazz. Today my teacher got me to improvise around the repeated Am, E7 chords on the first line. Homework (ie practice) is to learn all the chord inversions (with 7ths) around each of the chords in the piece and do more improvisation around all the chords in the piece.

The first time around it was all finger memory, and it would occasionally go wrong and I'd get lost. This (I hope!!) is a concerted effort to embedded the piece more deeply within me. Whatever, it is a great deal of fun.
Posted By: bSharp(C)yclist

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/20/19 09:02 PM

I think Inventions are the perfect replacement for Hanon ;0
Posted By: ebonykawai

Re: JSB was a Sadist - 08/22/19 04:45 PM

Originally Posted by cmb13
Ha! Deja vu! Reminds me of your Famous Quotation! I decided to take Bach more seriously, felt it would be good for me (like icky medicine), so here I am!


Let me know how you're enjoying the following fingering: 5-4-5-4-5-1-4-5-4-5-1-4

😂😂😂😂
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