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The benefits of having a teacher.

Posted By: Serge88

The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 09:30 PM

I had a teacher many years ago and after that I just learned by myself. After 20 years I been in and out of piano playing but this summer, I got a teacher and after 6 months of lessons here's the main benefit of having a teacher.

- She push me beyond my limits
- She can see errors that I didn't notice.
- She can show me a few tricks to learn difficult passage.
- She's a guide, she's been there and knows the path to achieve my goal.

And the most important thing, with a lesson every week, I have to practice everyday.

S
Posted By: LadyAcadia

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 09:52 PM

How very true; especially the part of having to practice very day!

I like that my teacher has also given me opportunities to play music that I would otherwise pass up, to perform in public and how to accompany a vocalist.
Posted By: AnthonyPaulO

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 10:02 PM

How often should a beginner have lessons with a teacher? Is it a once a week thing?
Posted By: CLM Piano Learner

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 10:06 PM

Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
How often should a beginner have lessons with a teacher? Is it a once a week thing?


I've been taking lessons now for 3 years with phases where I've had weekly lessons (30 minutes each lesson) and also every other week (one hour per lesson). My progress has been much better under the weekly approach.
Posted By: Serge88

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 10:31 PM

Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
How often should a beginner have lessons with a teacher? Is it a once a week thing?


The best is once a week but when I started 20 years ago, it was twice a month because I was so busy with job, family and friends. Progress was slow and I quit after a few years.
Posted By: Joe302

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 01/31/19 11:54 PM

Hi,
Having a teacher is invaluable for me.
He keeps me on the right track and motivated.
My first year or so I was taking 30 minutes once per week.
About half way through the second year I was taking 45 minutes per week.
So far, this is the sweet spot for me.
Joe
Posted By: CadenzaVvi

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 01:58 AM

Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
How often should a beginner have lessons with a teacher? Is it a once a week thing?

I think the weekly approach is the best, but depending of your situation, you might consider once every other week, once a month... depending on your schedule and such.

As for practice, I think it is better to have a 30-minute lesson every week than an hour every two weeks.
Posted By: thepianoplayer416

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 02:54 AM

Most people would agree that having a teacher is invaluable. And recently someone posted a discussion topic about group lessons. I have taken several of them and find them helpful and engaging over private one-on-one lessons. Whether you go for private or group lessons, the bottom-line is to practice everyday for at least half an hour. You may not get the individual attention of a private teacher, but if you are learning to play for personal interest and not planning on taking any conservatory exams in the foreseeable future.

Typically, music lessons can be once a week for the whole year unless somebody wants to take a summer break. Each lesson you would go home and practice what was taught and if you have any questions, you can ask your instructor at the next lesson or send the person an Email.

Once I met a man who started learning piano on his own. At first he had no piano and would go to a friend's place regularly for his weekly practices. A few months later, a friend was moving and gave him a piano that had been with the family for many years for free. Within a year, he learned to play 5 pieces of Classical music by watching video demos on YouTube by imitating hand patterns. The pieces are in the upper intermediate level (from 5-7 min.) so definitely not for beginners. He can play them reasonably well at a slower tempo and convinced a few people he played for at least 10 years. Once I told the man that he had the potential to go much further with a teacher. He agreed but...
He has financial issues which makes it difficult for him to pay for his lessons. Even after his money issues get resolved, he has a fear (almost a paranoia) of reading music as if he is asked to learn a foreign language. Maybe he had a bad experience in his childhood years learning to sight-read with a piano teacher that he would never learn to read again. He is quite happy just practicing the same 5 piece week after week without learning new pieces by even the same composers. No teacher who is into Classical music would accept a student who would only learn by imitating hand patterns. The man has more personal issues than I imagined so we went our separately ways. I would continue my weekly lessons and let him do his own thing.
Posted By: Tyrone Slothrop

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 03:40 AM

Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
Even after his money issues get resolved, he has a fear (almost a paranoia) of reading music as if he is asked to learn a foreign language. Maybe he had a bad experience in his childhood years learning to sight-read with a piano teacher that he would never learn to read again.

I just feel astounded by such stories. I can maybe understand if these were people who were illiterate altogether. Or maybe with a learning disability such as dyslexia. But most such people do read and write their native language, and don't appear to have learning disabilities. I just don't get it. It took me all of 2 days back in February with an iPhone app. It was so painless I even have trouble remembering the exact process of learning to read. Now, learning to play what you can read on the page - that's an entirely different matter wink

P.S. In case it's not clear, I am not using playing what is read, as part of learning to "read" itself - what I am referring to is the decoding of the music from the score into what should happen on the piano to make the music wink
Posted By: outo

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 06:16 AM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
Even after his money issues get resolved, he has a fear (almost a paranoia) of reading music as if he is asked to learn a foreign language. Maybe he had a bad experience in his childhood years learning to sight-read with a piano teacher that he would never learn to read again.

I just feel astounded by such stories. I can maybe understand if these were people who were illiterate altogether. Or maybe with a learning disability such as dyslexia. But most such people do read and write their native language, and don't appear to have learning disabilities. I just don't get it. It took me all of 2 days back in February with an iPhone app. It was so painless I even have trouble remembering the exact process of learning to read. Now, learning to play what you can read on the page - that's an entirely different matter wink

P.S. In case it's not clear, I am not using playing what is read, as part of learning to "read" itself - what I am referring to is the decoding of the music from the score into what should happen on the piano to make the music wink


Learning disabilities are quite common. I have seem estimates as high of 10% of people having some kind of learning challenge. Many people do not even know that their difficulties are a result of some cognitive defeciency. Dyslexia is just one form. A person can read and write perfectly while having problems with reading visual symbols such as musical notes. When a normal person learns to read text or notation, the decoding becomes automatic with enough right kind of practice. For someone with a learning disability this may never happen, no matter how much practice. It is extremely stressful for the brain and can explain why they quit trying. Some will figure out adaptive strategies that help to some extend.
Posted By: Tyrone Slothrop

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 06:50 AM

Originally Posted by outo
]Learning disabilities are quite common. I have seem estimates as high of 10% of people having some kind of learning challenge. Many people do not even know that their difficulties are a result of some cognitive defeciency. Dyslexia is just one form. A person can read and write perfectly while having problems with reading visual symbols such as musical notes. When a normal person learns to read text or notation, the decoding becomes automatic with enough right kind of practice. For someone with a learning disability this may never happen, no matter how much practice. It is extremely stressful for the brain and can explain why they quit trying. Some will figure out adaptive strategies that help to some extend.

Thanks for that explanation outo. But then my question is, of those who play or play with pianos is it only 10% or less that have never learned to read music? Because my sense is it is a lot more. Maybe I am just biased from being on Reddit where huge numbers of "piano/keyboard users" don't learn to read music.
Posted By: outo

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 07:13 AM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by outo
]Learning disabilities are quite common. I have seem estimates as high of 10% of people having some kind of learning challenge. Many people do not even know that their difficulties are a result of some cognitive defeciency. Dyslexia is just one form. A person can read and write perfectly while having problems with reading visual symbols such as musical notes. When a normal person learns to read text or notation, the decoding becomes automatic with enough right kind of practice. For someone with a learning disability this may never happen, no matter how much practice. It is extremely stressful for the brain and can explain why they quit trying. Some will figure out adaptive strategies that help to some extend.

Thanks for that explanation outo. But then my question is, of those who play or play with pianos is it only 10% or less that have never learned to read music? Because my sense is it is a lot more. Maybe I am just biased from being on Reddit where huge numbers of "piano/keyboard users" don't learn to read music.


There are many reasons why people do not learn to read music. My response was to explain how someone could be terrified to read music. I have a learning disability myself, which you probably could not tell from my writing.

I am now talking about classical music, not pop/rock music:
These days it is possible (maybe even fashionable) to learn to play pieces without learning to read because it is possible with the options available online. When I was a child it was not so. You simply had to learn to read unless you were gifted enough to learn purely by ear from recordings. And recordings were not available for everything and certainly not online whenever you wanted. The other option would have been to find a teacher who would show how to play everything to you, but I doubt many would. So one just had to learn to read or quit. Whatever learning disability one had was one's personal problem. It did take away lots of the enjoyment from playing and probably was the biggest reason why I finally quit. As an adult I still never question the need to read when learning pieces, but would never perform with a score because of the high stress levels and low playing quality associated with reading notes.
Posted By: Animisha

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 08:53 AM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
But then my question is, of those who play or play with pianos is it only 10% or less that have never learned to read music? Because my sense is it is a lot more. Maybe I am just biased from being on Reddit where huge numbers of "piano/keyboard users" don't learn to read music.

I think that it is way more than 10%, and I think most of them don't have reading disabilities. They just don't take playing with their piano as seriously as we all do. It's a hobby, a pleasant pastime, they want to play popular tunes or even some classical pieces, and the easiest way to learn it is the best way. And there is nothing wrong with that. smile
Posted By: thepianoplayer416

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 09:25 AM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
I just feel astounded by such stories. I can maybe understand if these were people who were illiterate altogether. Or maybe with a learning disability such as dyslexia. But most such people do read and write their native language, and don't appear to have learning disabilities. I just don't get it. It took me all of 2 days back in February with an iPhone app. It was so painless I even have trouble remembering the exact process of learning to read. Now, learning to play what you can read on the page - that's an entirely different matter wink

P.S. In case it's not clear, I am not using playing what is read, as part of learning to "read" itself - what I am referring to is the decoding of the music from the score into what should happen on the piano to make the music wink


I see that a number of people are jumping into conclusions about the man in question and whether or not he has a learning disability. I first met him through another friend at a party. He once worked as a financial adviser and is retired in his 70s. According to his friends he worked well with numbers and took early retirement due to stress.

For a few years we became close friends with a common interest in piano playing. After hearing somebody learn to play pieces of Classical music at an advanced level by ear and watching finger patterns, I wouldn't come to the conclusion the man has learning disabilities. While many of us would think reading music is a faster approach to learning, he prefers to use the more painstaking approach of slowing down and stopping a video performance of a Chopin Nocturne many times just to see which keys were being pressed. The number of months it would take to perfect 1 piece, most people including myself would think he would have taken the effort to learn how to read the notes. A while ago, I started a conversation on music history & the biography of various composers. Knowing the time period a piece is written affects the way it is performed. The man showed no interest in music history. All he wanted was to perfect the pieces he started by following hand gestures & finger sequences off videos. As an monolingual English-speaker all his life, he said that music notation is a foreign language which is difficult to master and refused to discuss the subject again. He may have lived in other countries but didn't pick up a foreign word or phrase.

The last thing I found out about the mystery man was that he has an addiction problem to prescription medications. All the people I met at the party who knew him assumed he needed the medications to relieve stress from the work he was doing. About 2 years ago I observed that half the time the man got so sick he would be in bed most of the day. As far as I am concerned, the man may have been taken medications much longer and his addiction was the reason for his early retirement. I don't want to get into details about a man's private life and jump into conclusions based on speculation. As much as musicians take for granted that reading music and playing Classical music goes together, here is a man who is playing a few pieces some of us are struggling to learn with video demos as his only resource. As odd as his life story may be, we just have to accept his approach to learning piano.
Posted By: Ted

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 09:29 AM

The benefits of having my teacher, during my teenage years and early twenties were not measurable in terms of skills such as reading and writing music, physical technique or knowledge of chords and keyboard formations; I had taught myself these things before I met him and was expected to maintain and develop them more or less independently. Lessons would usually comprise my improvising for him and then he improvising for me. He did assign a lot of difficult pieces, which I usually managed to play, but in retrospect nothing had much to do with reading music or finger dexterity. It was his underlying musical ideas which fired me up with enthusiasm to get home and try them out, that made my years with him an indispensable part of my musical mind into the future. He operated on the assumption that I had music in me already and he was there to help me get it out, perhaps that is the most succinct way of putting it.
Posted By: outo

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 09:44 AM

Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416

I see that a number of people are jumping into conclusions about the man in question and whether or not he has a learning disability. I first met him through another friend at a party. He once worked as a financial adviser and is retired in his 70s. According to his friends he worked well with numbers and took early retirement due to stress.


I don't think anyone here jumped to any conclusions about your man, the discussion was on a more general level about possible reasons that make people avoid reading music.

Learning disabilities and the consequences differ greatly from person to person and despite them one can success in many areas in life, even school. You cannot tell looking only at the end result.


Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416

After hearing somebody learn to play pieces of Classical music at an advanced level by ear and watching finger patterns, I wouldn't come to the conclusion the man has learning disabilities.


Well, it is certainly not impossible to play (or even read) advanced music with a learning disability. It's just often way harder and one may need to use unconventional methods. But one needs to be able to handle the anxiety caused by the problem itself added with the ignorant attitude from others (even teachers) towards your problems.
Posted By: Nahum

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 09:58 AM

Originally Posted by outo
[

Learning disabilities are quite common. I have seem estimates as high of 10% of people having some kind of learning challenge. Many people do not even know that their difficulties are a result of some cognitive defeciency. Dyslexia is just one form.
There may also be problems of sight, problems of the width of visual field, problems of simultaneous perception of several voices , sight stability problems (f.e. shaky apples of eyes) . I don’t know if statistics take this into account.
Posted By: outo

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 10:07 AM

Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by outo
[

Learning disabilities are quite common. I have seem estimates as high of 10% of people having some kind of learning challenge. Many people do not even know that their difficulties are a result of some cognitive defeciency. Dyslexia is just one form.
There may also be problems of sight, problems of the width of visual field, problems of simultaneous perception of several voices , sight stability problems (f.e. shaky apples of eyes) . I don’t know if statistics take this into account.


The 10% is just a rough estimate anyway and the line between "normal" and "challenged" cannot be clearly drawn out. But very true, sight issues certainly don't make it any easier.
Posted By: Michael P Walsh

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 10:25 AM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
Even after his money issues get resolved, he has a fear (almost a paranoia) of reading music as if he is asked to learn a foreign language. Maybe he had a bad experience in his childhood years learning to sight-read with a piano teacher that he would never learn to read again.

I just feel astounded by such stories. I can maybe understand if these were people who were illiterate altogether. Or maybe with a learning disability such as dyslexia. But most such people do read and write their native language, and don't appear to have learning disabilities. I just don't get it. It took me all of 2 days back in February with an iPhone app. It was so painless I even have trouble remembering the exact process of learning to read. Now, learning to play what you can read on the page - that's an entirely different matter wink

P.S. In case it's not clear, I am not using playing what is read, as part of learning to "read" itself - what I am referring to is the decoding of the music from the score into what should happen on the piano to make the music wink


Some people just have fears of the unknown and what they perceive to be extremely difficult. Instead of facing it they just avoid it altogether. It becomes a mental block. I'm the same in terms of sight reading. I avoid it. Now I can read music, I understand it's language perfectly well but actual real sight reading I avoid. Instead I take things one bar at a time and purposefully memorise each bar. It's a form of sight reading (otherwise I wouldn't understand it at all) but it's not done in the conventional manner of what most musicians call sight reading.
Posted By: ghosthand

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 10:44 AM

I always feel a bit melancholic when I read all this wise advice on "you must practice at least one hour a day" and so on. Once upon a time it was a motivation issue for me too. Nowadays I want so badly to practice but I CANNOT because my life does not allow it. I practice whenever I have the time but so very often I just don't have the possibilities. Don't talk about "priorities" here because noone would disagree about my priorities if they had known the full story ... well, those who don't like piano playing would of course say that I should drop piano practice completely but I refuse to do that.

But it is right now an utopia to have a regular practice schedule. And the nearest teacher lives so far away that I must reserve at least half a day to get there, have my lesson and go back home, so this "30 minutes a week" is also out of the question. The most intense schedule I have had as an adult, was one hour every fortnight but it often had to be adjusted to suit my job schedule. I run my own freelance business and I need to adapt to very short lead times and deadlines all the time, I can seldom plan for the next week.

On the other hand, I had 20 minutes every week when I was a school kid and it was a worthless schedule if you ask me. To little time to work in-depth with anything, and too little time inbetween for practice - after all, I had school too. And I lost my motivation that way, so I did not practice as much as I could have, so I had to show up, week after week and make apologies to my teacher ... You know, in this way your original goal (to learn to play the piano because you love it) somehow gets replaced with "please your teacher" and that takes the fun out of it. And I was too young to be able to analyze the situation. Today, the problem is the opposite, now I struggle to find practice time, not to get out of it ...

I believe it is good to have lessons often when you are a beginner, need a lot of guidance and have short assignments. Or when you are advanced and have hours to practice every day. But I am advanced in the aspect that I work with long and difficult works, full sonatas and so on. With my irregular practice possibilities they take many months, sometimes years, to learn. There is absolutely no point for me in having short lessons where we can work only with snippets of a piece.

Having said that, my conclusion is that lesson time and frequency is a highly individual matter, it is no solution that is ideal for everyone. I have reached the stage, though, when I do not pity those who cannot motivate themselve to practice even though they have the possibilities - either you love to play the piano, and then you play the piano as much as you can (and that varies according to your circumstances), or you are perfectly happy with the situation just as it is and that is ok too. The choice is yours. But the drive to practice (or not to) should not come from your teacher.

Otherwise, it is good to have a teacher. Playing the piano can be quite lonely and you need feedback and input from someone who both is paid to give you honest feedback and input and also is skilled enough to do it properly. The lessons are good for structuring. You can, if you are lucky, get help to participate in group gathering and recitals and that is incredibly fun. My own piano teacher is also a very sweet and nice person who I look forward to meet ... unfortunately she is on sick leave, long-term, so at the moment I don't have a teacher to see. frown I have an offer to get lessons online from the other side of the planet but this requires arrangements that are not feasible at the moment.
Posted By: elenmirie

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 10:49 AM

Apropos of nothing, I'm going to jump into this discussion. I'm married to someone who has a great desire for music, a background in music as a DJ and karaoke singer in the 1960s- 1980s, and can't, won't, refuses to learn the first thing about music.

<rant>

If I could go back in time, I would give a piece of my mind to the people that taught him to love music without giving him the basics of how to navigate the waters of Western music. He sang as a boy soprano in a church choir, it wasn't a cathedral, but it was the foremost Anglican church in a major town near London - name withheld to protect the guilty. They paid the kids a princely sum (for kids) to turn up and sing. BUT. They taught them everything by rote, no reading, no solfege, no theory. NOTHING. Just turn up and sing the notes we tell you, and here's your sixpence.

Result: A 63 year old man that loves music but doesn't want to be a beginner and has hands injured from years of cricket and being a goalie at football. I tried getting him into an a capella choir once, where everything was learned by rote (with solfege and recordings) but no reading music. The five guys in the choir welcomed him, thought he was brilliant. BUT. He wouldn't do it. In fact he broke into tears when telling me that he wouldn't do it. Somehow it was all too much.

I tried to teach him just a little bit of piano (play a triad) but his hands wouldn't go into a 1-3-5 position (see above about sport injuries) and that was the end of that. I thought that was the beginning, very basic stuff, but I was wrong.

He loves what I do, he thinks it's great that my playing is improving. I'm going to make it a priority to play something that he can sing along to, one of the pop songs that he loves.

But these are the crimes that are committed against people that hold them back in later life. It's getting worse, I think. Only the privileged have access to early music lessons, now. Try telling someone who didn't grow up in the right family that they can do music, and see what happens.

</rant>
Posted By: elenmirie

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 11:09 AM

Ghosthand: Blessed be.
Posted By: Animisha

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 11:27 AM

Ghosthand and elenmirie - you both tell such touching stories! I really feel for both.

Ghosthand, have you considered a video teacher who gives you feedback?
Posted By: Tyrone Slothrop

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 02:00 PM

I felt privileged to hear both ghosthand tale of herself and elenmirie's tale her husband. Very moving. A virtual hug to both of you and elenmirie's husband.
Posted By: spartan928

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 03:30 PM

I'd like to reiterate what serge mentioned in the first post and add one thing. I find the social pressure of a teacher is actually very important. You have to perform for someone else and that alone is an aspect of piano performance that is a skill. I'm about 10 months into lessons, raw beginner when I started, and I still get nervous when I go and make more mistakes. But, I've come to believe this is useful. Learning to have a calm, relaxed mind and hands when playing for the teacher is a skill itself I have been working on because I want to perform the piano for others in the future as my ultimate goal.
Posted By: elenmirie

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 03:40 PM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
I felt privileged to hear both ghosthand tale of herself and elenmirie's tale her husband. Very moving. A virtual hug to both of you and elenmirie's husband.

Hugs back, Tyrone! Thanks.
Posted By: elenmirie

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 03:43 PM

Originally Posted by Animisha
Ghosthand and elenmirie - you both tell such touching stories! I really feel for both.

Ghosthand, have you considered a video teacher who gives you feedback?

Thanks Animisha! We go onward, through the fog... smile
Posted By: Progman

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 08:51 PM

Originally Posted by spartan928
I'd like to reiterate what serge mentioned in the first post and add one thing. I find the social pressure of a teacher is actually very important. You have to perform for someone else and that alone is an aspect of piano performance that is a skill. I'm about 10 months into lessons, raw beginner when I started, and I still get nervous when I go and make more mistakes. But, I've come to believe this is useful. Learning to have a calm, relaxed mind and hands when playing for the teacher is a skill itself I have been working on because I want to perform the piano for others in the future as my ultimate goal.


+1, at 7 months in I am much better at performing for my teacher. The other thing, whenever I describe to her a technical problem she has the answer. Whether fingering, or counting, or marking the score, or even just how to think about something.....She tells me how to think! Love my Teacher
Posted By: CadenzaVvi

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/01/19 09:35 PM

I deeply agree with the fact that the need for a teacher vary from person to person. And sometimes, you could want lessons but can't, for many reasons, and I think that shouldn't refrain anyone to start an instrument.

But it is also important to know that starting learning music on your own will surely result in bad habits that you'll have to work on later (ideally) and will lead to slower progress.

Also, every teacher is not suited for any student. You have to find the one that fits your goals and personality. It can be challenging for some (depending on your region and availabilities).


As for myself, I know I wouldn't have pursue the piano without a teacher. I wouldn't have known how to address some of my problems and would have been discouraged by my lack of progress. In a way, I admire those who can learn by themselves. But I don't envy them, because what my teacher brings me is invaluable and I wouldn't want to go without it.
Posted By: Serge88

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/02/19 02:51 PM

Finding the right teacher is important.

When I started I didn't know anything about classical music, I was more interested in pop rock music. My teacher was a classical piano teacher so I discovered Mozart, Bach and Beethoven but at one point I had enough of classical and I quit.

My new teacher studied classical and she just graduated from university in piano jazz. She also play keyboard in a metal band, she a perfect match for me, we do classical and non classical piano.
Posted By: Tyrone Slothrop

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/02/19 03:10 PM

Originally Posted by Serge88
My new teacher studied classical and she just graduated from university in piano jazz. She also play keyboard in a metal band, she a perfect match for me, we do classical and non classical piano.

Wow. Your teacher sounds a little bit like Viktoriya Yermolyeva! smile
Posted By: Serge88

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/02/19 06:24 PM

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

Wow. Your teacher sounds a little bit like Viktoriya Yermolyeva! smile



smirk Yes she does.
Posted By: Tyrone Slothrop

Re: The benefits of having a teacher. - 02/02/19 06:34 PM

Originally Posted by Serge88
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

Wow. Your teacher sounds a little bit like Viktoriya Yermolyeva! smile

smirk Yes she does.

Yes she does or yes she is? wink wink
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