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I've found that instead of practicing like this:

1) half an hour of Bach
2) an hour of Beethoven
3) two hours of tchaikovsky
3) an hour of Saint-Saens
etc.
etc.
-have a nervous breakdown
etc.
etc.
-go to sleep

what works better for me is dividing the practice time for every piece up into small chunks throughout the day, so that the memories of every piece are constantly being refreshed... like so:

1) 10 minutes of Bach
2) 15 minutes of Beethoven
3) 30 minutes of Tchaikovski
4) 10 more minutes of Bach
5) 10 minutes of Liszt
6) 30 more minutes of Tchaikovsky
7) etc.
8) etc.
9) have a more minor nervous breakdown
10) etc.
11) etc.
12) sleep

I've found that this works especially well with extremely difficult sections.

On the other hand, though, you no longer can get the most taxing pieces practiced at the beginning of the day when you're still fresh, so there's a downside.

Which do you think is better?
Originally Posted by CianistAndPomposer
On the other hand, though, you no longer can get the most taxing pieces practiced at the beginning of the day when you're still fresh, so there's a downside.

If you identify the most taxing parts of each piece, you can spend your first 10 minutes on the most taxing parts of Bach, followed by 15 minutes with the most taxing parts of Beethoven, etc.

Now I am just an amateur, but I practise more like your second schedule than like your first.
You can also decrease the time allotted on each so that all difficult sections get a chunk of the time when you are most fresh (whatever that is for you) 10, 10, 10, 10, 10 for instance. If you have identified the problems, and the goal for each, a lot can be done in 10 minutes. If I work on an individual piece for 30 minutes at one sitting, it is because I have pre-identified multiple problem areas, each one getting a small chunk of time

Works for me.
How much one practices a given section or passage of a work is really quite personal. I think one should never work past the point of mental fatigue or past the point of diminishing physical returns, but surely that's up to the individual, the time of day, the frame of mind, the physical condition, etc., etc.

Regards,
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