Piano World Home Page
(Maybe make it this one?)

How about a thread where we mention important concerts that are coming up, as far in advance as we can?

I for one would find it very useful. Like, I often wonder if people like Argerich or Sokolov or Lisitsa or Grosvenor or Beatrice Rana or (pardon me) grin Lang Lang or, I don't know, Franz Liszt are going to be appearing somewhere, and so occasionally I google some of them to see, but nobody can google everybody all the time, and so sometimes when we do find out, it's too late to do anything about it......
Well, a Chopin concert started 4 mins ago on Medici TV. Is that the sort of thing you are looking for?
I think it’s a great idea! I’d subscribe definitely.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Well, a Chopin concert started 4 mins ago on Medici TV. Is that the sort of thing you are looking for?

If it was Chopin performing it definitely is. grin
I would subscribe too, especially if there are any good performances on the west coast. I will travel to see them!
I would love such a thread—- as I need to travel to see outstanding concerts and need advance notice
Originally Posted by Mark_C
... or Beatrice Rana or ...


In Zankel hall in March. I've got seats in the front row!
And how's this for an unusual concert, also in Zankel.

https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calendar/2019/02/05/Leon-Fleisher-and-Friends-0730PM

Leon Fleischer's 90th birthday celebration. He'll do some solo stuff and some 4 hand stuff with some former students, including Jonathan Biss, Yefim Bronfman, Katherine Jacobson, and a 'surprise guest'.

Jon: Thanks for both of those!
Exactly the kinds of things I'm wanting to know about.

And even if they weren't, someone would! smile
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Jon: Thanks for both of those!
Exactly the kinds of things I'm wanting to know about.

And even if they weren't, someone would! smile


It breaks my heart to see such wonderful music scheduled but on a weeknight . There is no way I take off work three days to attend sick
Actually would be cool to maintain a group calander and load dates from several selected sites. Can this be hosted on this site somehow? I would be happy to help. We could put together a list of sites of interest. I’ve always felt it was a problem not knowing who was performing where and when (even in rock pop and jazz). Too much work?
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Originally Posted by Mark_C
... or Beatrice Rana or ...

In Zankel hall in March. I've got seats in the front row!

......and now we're in too. smile
(We'll be a few rows behind you.)

Thank you!!
Can we plug our own upcoming concerts, or should that be a different thread?

Edit: Better yet - I could be even more obnoxious and put it in my signature! ha
Originally Posted by Orange Soda King
Can we plug our own upcoming concerts, or should that be a different thread?

IMO:

It depends.

For example:

Yours, yes.
Mine, no. ha
Well, I'm doing one on Nov. 4 that will be live-streamed. First half is Schnittke's "Suite in the Old Style" with my violinist roommate, followed by Cherubini Horn Sonata No. 2 in F Major, and the second half is the "Horn" Trio Op. 40 by Brahms. It's a fundraiser/benefit concert, check out more info here (I think one can view this page even without a Facebook account):

https://www.facebook.com/events/1171887856285861/
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Originally Posted by Mark_C
... or Beatrice Rana or ...

In Zankel hall in March. I've got seats in the front row!

......and now we're in too. smile
(We'll be a few rows behind you.)

Thank you!!


Let's be sure to introduce ourselves. I'm a middle aged white guy with glasses who will be sitting with a middle aged black guy with glasses in the front row, just left of center. That should be sufficient information for you to pick me out of the crowd. smile
.....and I look like......oh never mind. grin

We'll look for you!
I got ticket for Martha Argerich in Berlin on Feb 26th playing Prokofiev 3. Daniel Barenboim is conducting. The big question is whether she'll show up.

Sokolov is playing in the Bozar in Brussels in March. I saw him there in April and he was fantastic. It's the perfect venue.

Mitsuko Uchida is playing Mozart Concertos there on January 31st.
Johnstaf: Thanks!

Originally Posted by johnstaf
Mitsuko Uchida is playing Mozart Concertos there on January 31st.

......and yes, she's another one that I would always be interested to know about, and I think many other people are also.
Leads me to a thought - maybe a new topic - who would you travel to see? To compile a list of upcoming events, compiling a list of touring pianists might be a good place to start.
Google Calendars has a public feature: https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37083?hl=en
This can be used to share any details noteworthy events on the calendar.
I am traveling to Mansfield, CT, UConn, to hear Frederic Rzewski performing his own "The People United Will Never Be Defeated" on Novenber 3rd.

I am traveling from Europe.
Originally Posted by OE1FEU
I am traveling to Mansfield, CT, UConn, to hear Frederic Rzewski performing his own "The People United Will Never Be Defeated" on Novenber 3rd.

I am traveling from Europe.

Also exactly the kind of thing I'm thrilled to know about, and wouldn't have.
We'll be looking into going.
If you are anywhere near Seattle, the President’s Piano series at Meany Hall, on the University of Washington campus, is impressive (intimate 1250 seat hall, beautiful acoustics). Last week we heard Marc-André Hamelin in recital. Coming up: Jeremy Denk in January, Filippo Gorini (Feb.), Emanuel Ax (April), and in May, Yekwon Sunwoo, Cliburn 2017 winner. Also: Stephen Hough with the Taiwan Philharmonic in November.
Very few people travel more than a small distance to see a concert. People who live in a given place know which venues have classical concerts and should check the online listings for those places. It takes just a few minutes to bookmark all the concert listings for all the venues.

Any listings on a PW thread are just duplicates of those listings, and they will only be a minuscule percentage of those listings that are easily available online. If someone is interested enough to travel far to see a famous pianist, just check their website for their concert schedule.
You would make a fine critic. grin

(I think many might feel a thread like this is a very useful additional resource.
I certainly do.)
Originally Posted by schinl
Google Calendars has a public feature: https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37083?hl=en
This can be used to share any details noteworthy events on the calendar.


Exactly! We could create one, link it here, and have people submit based on location or based on artist.
First attempt:

Piano Calendar

Trying to see if there is a way to click a link and get it to import automatically. No luck so far.
I think Yuja Wang is coming to the LA area in March. I may go see it smile
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
I think Yuja Wang is coming to the LA area in March. I may go see it smile


"it"? smile
Sorry, I meant the show/performance smile Here is a link.

https://www.laphil.com/events/performances/186/
There should be a clickable link enabling add to calendar but most sites don't seem to have one. Eventbrite does but it is a limited site.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Very few people travel more than a small distance to see a concert. People who live in a given place know which venues have classical concerts and should check the online listings for those places. It takes just a few minutes to bookmark all the concert listings for all the venues.

Any listings on a PW thread are just duplicates of those listings, and they will only be a minuscule percentage of those listings that are easily available online. If someone is interested enough to travel far to see a famous pianist, just check their website for their concert schedule.


Plover
You live in NYC so you have many options the remainder of us do not have. I have traveled from western Florida to NYC Follow specific pianists? I get to hear so few, that my list to follow would go around s NYC block. Please don’t assume the usefulness to others unless you live in a town of 30,000
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Very few people travel more than a small distance to see a concert. People who live in a given place know which venues have classical concerts and should check the online listings for those places. It takes just a few minutes to bookmark all the concert listings for all the venues.

Any listings on a PW thread are just duplicates of those listings, and they will only be a minuscule percentage of those listings that are easily available online. If someone is interested enough to travel far to see a famous pianist, just check their website for their concert schedule.


Plover
You live in NYC so you have many options the remainder of us do not have. I have traveled from western Florida to NYC Follow specific pianists? I get to hear so few, that my list to follow would go around s NYC block. Please don’t assume the usefulness to others unless you live in a town of 30,000
You traveled from Florida to NYC for a single concert??

I can't think of any pianists I would travel more than a couple of hours to hear even if I lived in a remote area. I can listen and watch them, sometimes in live performances, on YouTube. It's hard for me to imagine anyone would have a list of more than 10 pianists they would travel a distance to hear.

If whoever said they are traveling from Europe to hear Rzewski play his People United variations is traveling that far ONLY for that concert, I have to say I find that bizarre. I think he plays it on Youtube.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus

You traveled from Florida to NYC for a single concert??

I can't think of any pianists I would travel far to hear if I lived in a remote area. I can listen and watch them, sometimes in love performances, on YouTube. It's hard for me to imagine anyone would have a list of more than 10 pianists they would travel a distance to hear.

If whoever said they are traveling from France to hear Rzewski play his People United variations is traveling that far ONLY for that concert, I have to say I find that bizarre. I think he plays it on Youtube.


I think travelling to concerts is great. I have only a short flight to every major city in Western Europe. I go over in the morning, have a relaxed day, and then come home the next day. The pianists are probably doing the same thing a couple of times per week. grin
Many people I know travel for all sorts of recreational reasons. I have friends who travel to see Dave Matthews or other jam bands, friends who do marathons or ultras in various cities and even other countries, some who travel to see presidential libraries, some who travel to see baseball games at various parks even if the teams come here occasionally, etc.

I traveled to NY to see Beegie Adair; made a weekend of it and spent the weekend with my brother, who lives in NJ. I bought tickets to see Lisitsa in Amelia Island, a 6 hr drive, but then she booked another venue right in my town so I cancelled the other one. I also once bought tickets to see Umphrey's McGee in Atlanta but then they came to Miami so I cancelled that one too. My brother once went to Chicago for a special wine tasting after work, came back the same night in and out of Newark.

We've got one life to live, may as well make it count! Traveling by plane is not much different than a long bus ride was years ago. Plus, I have friends and family all over the country, so we make a weekend out of it.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Very few people travel more than a small distance to see a concert. People who live in a given place know which venues have classical concerts and should check the online listings for those places. It takes just a few minutes to bookmark all the concert listings for all the venues.

Any listings on a PW thread are just duplicates of those listings, and they will only be a minuscule percentage of those listings that are easily available online. If someone is interested enough to travel far to see a famous pianist, just check their website for their concert schedule.


Plover
You live in NYC so you have many options the remainder of us do not have. I have traveled from western Florida to NYC Follow specific pianists? I get to hear so few, that my list to follow would go around s NYC block. Please don’t assume the usefulness to others unless you live in a town of 30,000
You traveled from Florida to NYC for a single concert??

I can't think of any pianists I would travel more than a couple of hours to hear even if I lived in a remote area. I can listen and watch them, sometimes in live performances, on YouTube. It's hard for me to imagine anyone would have a list of more than 10 pianists they would travel a distance to hear.

If whoever said they are traveling from Europe to hear Rzewski play his People United variations is traveling that far ONLY for that concert, I have to say I find that bizarre. I think he plays it on Youtube.


Plover
Of course you wouldn’t travel— You don’t need to. But if you lived someplace without concerts, I bet you would. Think outside of your own little world. Some of us are hungry for great performances. Can I do it often? Of course not
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
You traveled from Florida to NYC for a single concert??

I've travel from Washington DC to NYC regularly for the opera since I'm a member of the Met. The 2018-19 season has just started and they will have three performances of the Ring Cycle. That will not only bring me up to NYC, it will keep me there for a few days. this time, I've talked with a friend in Utah about going with me, so he would be traveling even further for the performing arts. I've even traveled from DC to NY State (mid-state) for an extremely rarely performed opera. I don't see that as a big deal. I guess it depends on what it means to you, eh? I've even travelled to another country for a concert before. Can't remember where I was, but it wasn't Austria, and I travelled to Salzburg for an opera.

Given that these days, performing arts tickets can be up to $300 for orchestra/parterre (Met for example), a little travel seems almost like an incidental expense/bother.
I live in New York, and I've traveled to Boston a few times specifically for concerts.

For certain performers I might well travel a much longer distance. For example, to see Argerich I'd consider going halfway across the country. For others, like Chopin or LIszt, I'd go to Mars. ha
Originally Posted by Mark_C
For certain performers I might well travel a much longer distance. For example, to see Argerich I'd consider going halfway across the country.
I saw her three or four times right in NYC.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Plover
Of course you wouldn’t travel— You don’t need to. But if you lived someplace without concerts, I bet you would. Think outside of your own little world. Some of us are hungry for great performances. Can I do it often? Of course not
I said I wouldn't travel even if I lived in a remote area without easily available concerts. Maybe part of my thinking is due to the endless number of performances on Youtube.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Plover
Of course you wouldn’t travel— You don’t need to. But if you lived someplace without concerts, I bet you would. Think outside of your own little world. Some of us are hungry for great performances. Can I do it often? Of course not
I said I wouldn't travel even if I lived in a remote area without easily available concerts. Maybe part of my thinking is due to the endless number of performances on Youtube.

Well, if Youtube is like a concert to you, then maybe your are alive at the right time in history wink
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Mark_C
For certain performers I might well travel a much longer distance. For example, to see Argerich I'd consider going halfway across the country.
I saw her three or four times right in NYC.

So? grin

As they say, "what's your point".....
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Mark_C
For certain performers I might well travel a much longer distance. For example, to see Argerich I'd consider going halfway across the country.
I saw her three or four times right in NYC.

So? grin

As they say, "what's your point".....
You didn't have to leave NYC to hear her play.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Mark_C
As they say, "what's your point".....
You didn't have to leave NYC to hear her play.

Which is not a surprise since you live in the 6th largest city in the world as ranked by urban area population. It would be a surprise if you said <some major performer> had never given a concert in NYC.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Very few people travel more than a small distance to see a concert. People who live in a given place know which venues have classical concerts and should check the online listings for those places. It takes just a few minutes to bookmark all the concert listings for all the venues.

Any listings on a PW thread are just duplicates of those listings, and they will only be a minuscule percentage of those listings that are easily available online. If someone is interested enough to travel far to see a famous pianist, just check their website for their concert schedule.


Plover
You live in NYC so you have many options the remainder of us do not have. I have traveled from western Florida to NYC Follow specific pianists? I get to hear so few, that my list to follow would go around s NYC block. Please don’t assume the usefulness to others unless you live in a town of 30,000
You traveled from Florida to NYC for a single concert??

I can't think of any pianists I would travel more than a couple of hours to hear even if I lived in a remote area. I can listen and watch them, sometimes in live performances, on YouTube. It's hard for me to imagine anyone would have a list of more than 10 pianists they would travel a distance to hear.

If whoever said they are traveling from Europe to hear Rzewski play his People United variations is traveling that far ONLY for that concert, I have to say I find that bizarre. I think he plays it on Youtube.


This is a great thread. I know many people that travel hours to see a huge name pianist/performer. It's not uncommon at all.

I also enjoy reading about the events various people are going to, even though I probably won't go.
Originally Posted by cmb13
Many people I know travel for all sorts of recreational reasons. I have friends who travel to see Dave Matthews or other jam bands, friends who do marathons or ultras in various cities and even other countries, some who travel to see presidential libraries, some who travel to see baseball games at various parks even if the teams come here occasionally, etc.

I traveled to NY to see Beegie Adair; made a weekend of it and spent the weekend with my brother, who lives in NJ. I bought tickets to see Lisitsa in Amelia Island, a 6 hr drive, but then she booked another venue right in my town so I cancelled the other one. I also once bought tickets to see Umphrey's McGee in Atlanta but then they came to Miami so I cancelled that one too. My brother once went to Chicago for a special wine tasting after work, came back the same night in and out of Newark.

We've got one life to live, may as well make it count! Traveling by plane is not much different than a long bus ride was years ago. Plus, I have friends and family all over the country, so we make a weekend out of it.

Exactly.

I don't know if there's a pianist I'd travel far to watch; but years ago I flew to Amsterdam to watch the Bangles perform. Last year I flew to London to watch "Harry Potter and the cursed child". And I haven't even mentioned football fans who travel all around Europe to watch their favorite team play.

So if you want to travel far to watch a piano concert: Go for it.
About half a century ago, I travelled to Amsterdam to watch Amadeus grin - OK, I happened to be there while on a budget (read: penniless) 'backpacking' Inter-Rail trip around Europe, and even though it cost me one night's accommodation in a youth hostel, I couldn't wait until I'd returned to the UK to watch it, such was my addiction to all things Mozartian. And it was worth it, even if I had to put up with the Dutch subtitles (the movie of course wasn't dubbed, unlike what happens in France and some other countries).

I get the brochure sent to me automatically by post every year from the Schubertiade which is held in Schwarzenberg and Hohenems (Austria), with the delights in 2018 including Sabine Meyer playing the Brahms Clarinet Quintet, Khatia Buniatishvili playing Brahms's Sonata No.3 and Tchaikovsky/Pletnev and Rach's Cello Sonata, Christoph Prégardien and Ian Bostridge singing Schubert, Igor Levit playing the Diabelli, Hamelin playing Beethoven/Liszt, and the pièce de résistance, a mandolin & accordion duo (Avi Avital & Ksenija Sidorova) playing Mozart, Bach, Villa-Lobos and Bartók. Almost irresistible, especially in such idyllic locations.....except that I almost always find somewhere else exotic to travel and climb instead whistle.

Maybe next year.......
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
You didn't have to leave NYC to hear her play.

You're looking at this through a remarkably narrow lens.

A few things:

-- What good does that do me now? She's not playing in NYC, nor probably any time soon.

-- I didn't go then. Maybe you might say that's my mistake, and maybe it was. But, maybe someone just wasn't particularly in a mindset of going to concerts at that time (or times), but is now? What if someone didn't go because he just didn't know -- we can even say, maybe it was because we didn't have a thread like this one at that time? Or that it was before this site existed, maybe before this person was on the internet at all and just wasn't much plugged into what concerts were going on?

-- Running through all this, you're looking at this exquisitely personally, which is fine -- for yourself. It takes no account of what might be relevant for others.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Johnstaf: Thanks!

Originally Posted by johnstaf
Mitsuko Uchida is playing Mozart Concertos there on January 31st.

......and yes, she's another one that I would always be interested to know about, and I think many other people are also.



April 30, also at Carnegie.
I'm planning on seeing Marc-Andre Hamelin at Stern Hall on Nov 15th. Never seen him play in person before, not sure if I should be excited or scared of being demoralized.
Originally Posted by trigalg693
I'm planning on seeing Marc-Andre Hamelin at Stern Hall on Nov 15th. Never seen him play in person before, not sure if I should be excited or scared of being demoralized.

Hamelin’s concert last week was thrilling. I had heard of him as a brilliant technician and so I expected a cold or sterile performance. Instead: he played a quite varied selection of works — including a long rather modern piece by Feinberg that wasn’t really to my taste — with such commitment and daring (including a couple of little wobbles, or so it seemed) that I eagerly joined in the standing ovation before the intermission. His playing conveyed how deeply interesting this music is to him, and that made me interested in it too. Knocked my socks off! Made me want to be a more daring player, to worry less about hitting every key perfectly and instead to think more about how to deliver to a listener what I love about the music I am playing. Commitment and daring! (And try to hit the right notes too.)

Yeah, these are Big Thoughts for someone who has been playing for less than 2 years! But still, it’s what his playing made me think. Go, and may your playing be enriched!
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Plover
Of course you wouldn’t travel— You don’t need to. But if you lived someplace without concerts, I bet you would. Think outside of your own little world. Some of us are hungry for great performances. Can I do it often? Of course not
I said I wouldn't travel even if I lived in a remote area without easily available concerts. Maybe part of my thinking is due to the endless number of performances on Youtube.

I live in London where we certainly have no shortage of music. But I am just about to travel to Vienna for am opera. Of course, everyone is different.
Originally Posted by David-G
I live in London where we certainly have no shortage of music. But I am just about to travel to Vienna for an opera. Of course, everyone is different.

Yes.
I once went from New York to Monte Carlo for an opera. grin

I had gotten kind of obsessed about this particular obscure opera (Cherubin, by Massenet) because of a beautiful old poster for it (about 100 years old). I sent letters and made phone calls all over to try to find out if it was being performed anywhere. (This was long before I was on the internet.) I lucked out -- it so happened that it was being done soon, and in such a beautiful place. This was a total fluke. As I've since learned, years go by without any major performances of it. I would have gone just about anywhere for it.
I’ve always said that if Page Plant Jones and Jason play together is fly anywhere. London would be the most likely site.
Originally Posted by trigalg693
I'm planning on seeing Marc-Andre Hamelin at Stern Hall on Nov 15th. Never seen him play in person before, not sure if I should be excited or scared of being demoralized.



Me too. I got great seats, perfect really. First tier near the front, perfect view of the keyboard.

I saw him a decade ago at Mannes I think. He played Gaspard and the Liszt sonata on the same program. Make no small plans, they say.

I’m really looking forward to this concert.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by David-G
I live in London where we certainly have no shortage of music. But I am just about to travel to Vienna for an opera. Of course, everyone is different.

Yes.
I once went from New York to Monte Carlo for an opera. grin

I had gotten kind of obsessed about this particular obscure opera (Cherubin, by Massenet) because of a beautiful old poster for it (about 100 years old). I sent letters and made phone calls all over to try to find out if it was being performed anywhere. (This was long before I was on the internet.) I lucked out -- it so happened that it was being done soon, and in such a beautiful place. This was a total fluke. As I've since learned, years go by without any major performances of it. I would have gone just about anywhere for it.

I looked it up. Oh what fun! How was it? Did you rid yourself of your obsession? I see Naxos has the video of a performance in Sardinia from 2006. I must add to my queue.

A few years ago, I traveled 330mi to see this rarely performed opera, "Oresteia" by Sergei Taneyev. It was totally worth it. Even today, I don't see any videos of Oresteia. But it will live in my memory smile
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I once went from New York to Monte Carlo for an opera. grin

I had gotten kind of obsessed about this particular obscure opera (Cherubin, by Massenet) because of a beautiful old poster for it (about 100 years old). I sent letters and made phone calls all over to try to find out if it was being performed anywhere. (This was long before I was on the internet.) I lucked out -- it so happened that it was being done soon, and in such a beautiful place. This was a total fluke. As I've since learned, years go by without any major performances of it. I would have gone just about anywhere for it.

I looked it up. Oh what fun! How was it? Did you rid yourself of your obsession? I see Naxos has the video of a performance in Sardinia from 2006. I must add to my queue.

It was beautiful, in every way.
As Yogi Berra said after seeing some opera (true story, supposedly), "Even the music was good." ha

Such a beautiful setting and beautiful opera house, such a visually beautiful opera, and yeah, even the music was good. smile
Perhaps not the greatest music ever written but beautiful, and the cast was top-class.

And yes, the obsession ended as soon as I found out that the opera was being performed somewhere, and got the tickets.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I once went from New York to Monte Carlo for an opera. grin

I had gotten kind of obsessed about this particular obscure opera (Cherubin, by Massenet) because of a beautiful old poster for it (about 100 years old). I sent letters and made phone calls all over to try to find out if it was being performed anywhere. (This was long before I was on the internet.) I lucked out -- it so happened that it was being done soon, and in such a beautiful place. This was a total fluke. As I've since learned, years go by without any major performances of it. I would have gone just about anywhere for it.

I looked it up. Oh what fun! How was it? Did you rid yourself of your obsession? I see Naxos has the video of a performance in Sardinia from 2006. I must add to my queue.

It was beautiful, in every way.
As Yogi Berra said after seeing some opera (true story, supposedly), "Even the music was good." ha

Such a beautiful setting and beautiful opera house, such a visually beautiful opera, and yeah, even the music was good. smile
Perhaps not the greatest music ever written but beautiful, and the cast was top-class.

And yes, the obsession ended as soon as I found out that the opera was being performed somewhere, and got the tickets.

That's so nice. And it was a nice opera house? A friend of my wife's lives part of the year in Monte Carlo and has invited us over to see them. But I've never had a good reason, except to play poker, and I can do that here in the US. Maybe I should look up what is playing... Oh, it appears one of my favorites, Verdi's Otello is playing in January. I wonder what the weather is like in January? Probably too cold.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
....I wonder what the weather is like in January? Probably too cold.

Warmer than Washington D.C.! grin

Internet says:
average daily high 54° F
average daily low 46° F
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
I think Yuja Wang is coming to the LA area in March. I may go see it smile


I'm thinking of going too, I am not too far away in Las Vegas. But the most reasonable ticket is $130ish, and from that seat she's a tiny speck in the horizon.
Listening to some John Adams now to see if he's my cup of tea..
Martha Argerich will be playing Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and Lahav Shani tomorrow, 21 Dec 2018, broadcast live in HD on Medici.TV. Unfortunately, it is only accessible to those with a premium subscription, but if you love Argerich and Prokofiev's 3rd, then it might be worth the $18 to sign up for a month. Sadly, I'm going to be busy during that time so I will have to catch the recorded version later, but if someone absolutely wants to see it live when broadcast, you can PM me. First come, first serve wink

Quote
Get ready for a thrilling end to a thrilling year! Martha Argerich and Lahav Shani take on Prokofiev, live from Rotterdam. Yuja Wang in recital, streaming from Berlin. Claudio Abbado's unforgettable tribute to Herbert von Karajan. Nelson Freire and Martha Argerich in an iconic performance for two pianos. And this is just part one... Join us as we bid adieu to 2018 in style!

LIVE SOON PREMIUM Friday, Dec. 21st at 12:15pm (EST)/ 5:15pm (GMT)
Martha Argerich plays Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3!
With the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and Lahav Shani
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I for one would find it very useful. Like, I often wonder if people like Argerich or Sokolov or Lisitsa or Grosvenor or Beatrice Rana or (pardon me) grin Lang Lang or, I don't know, Franz Liszt are going to be appearing somewhere, and so occasionally I google some of them to see, but nobody can google everybody all the time, and so sometimes when we do find out, it's too late to do anything about it......

Wonder as to where Liszt might be performing, next? grin
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I for one would find it very useful. Like, I often wonder if people like Argerich or Sokolov or Lisitsa or Grosvenor or Beatrice Rana or (pardon me) grin Lang Lang or, I don't know, Franz Liszt are going to be appearing somewhere, and so occasionally I google some of them to see, but nobody can google everybody all the time, and so sometimes when we do find out, it's too late to do anything about it......


Wonder as to where Liszt might be performing, next? grin

Yeah, I'd definitely want to be alerted to that one as well grin
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I for one would find it very useful. Like, I often wonder if people like Argerich or Sokolov or Lisitsa or Grosvenor or Beatrice Rana or (pardon me) grin Lang Lang or, I don't know, Franz Liszt are going to be appearing somewhere, and so occasionally I google some of them to see, but nobody can google everybody all the time, and so sometimes when we do find out, it's too late to do anything about it......


Wonder as to where Liszt might be performing, next? grin

Yeah, I'd definitely want to be alerted to that one as well grin


I would pay BIG $$$$$ to see that cool
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I for one would find it very useful. Like, I often wonder if people like Argerich or Sokolov or Lisitsa or Grosvenor or Beatrice Rana or (pardon me) grin Lang Lang or, I don't know, Franz Liszt are going to be appearing somewhere, and so occasionally I google some of them to see, but nobody can google everybody all the time, and so sometimes when we do find out, it's too late to do anything about it......


Wonder as to where Liszt might be performing, next? grin

Yeah, I'd definitely want to be alerted to that one as well grin


I would pay BIG $$$$$ to see that cool

TAKE MY LIFE SAVINGS ALREADY! grin
You’re in luck, guys. It’s a rematch between him and Thalberg. Pay-per-view, or live in Atlantic City.
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
.....or live in Atlantic City.

Sounds like kind of a gamble. ha
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Sounds like kind of a gamble. ha


+1

Extra note:

Managed to avoid gun fire around my house on this Christmas evening as it turned out to be just a few "pops" from leftover 4th of July fireworks that some neighbors have been fooling around with. grin
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Sounds like kind of a gamble. ha


+1

Extra note:

Managed to avoid gun fire around my house on this Christmas evening as it turned out to be just a few "pops" from leftover 4th of July fireworks that some neighbors have been fooling around with. grin


And, as it is nearly midnight as of now -- everything has settled down. thumb
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by Orange Soda King
Can we plug our own upcoming concerts, or should that be a different thread?

IMO:

It depends.

For example:

Yours, yes.
Mine, no. ha

Mine probably not either, but I'll be performing the Brahms Quintet with some fabulous string players on Sunday January 13th at the Lyceum in Alexandria, VA. There will also be a performance of a wind quintet by Ewazen, which I am very keen to hear.

Program and venue details at http://www.fmmc.org/event/lyceum-concert-series-22/
Originally Posted by SiFi
Mine probably not either, but I'll be performing the Brahms Quintet with some fabulous string players on Sunday January 13th at the Lyceum in Alexandria, VA. There will also be a performance of a wind quintet by Ewazen, which I am very keen to hear.

Program and venue details at http://www.fmmc.org/event/lyceum-concert-series-22/

I'm in DC, so this is just across the river. If I come, I'll be sure to come up and say hi.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by SiFi

I'm in DC, so this is just across the river. If I come, I'll be sure to come up and say hi.

That'd be great! cool My real name is Simon Finlow, though now I think about it, I'll be the only piano guy there so I should be easy to find.
ha
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by SiFi

I'm in DC, so this is just across the river. If I come, I'll be sure to come up and say hi.

That'd be great! cool My real name is Simon Finlow, though now I think about it, I'll be the only piano guy there so I should be easy to find.
ha

I completely lost track of time and but I was in the first PW online gathering and Sibylle asked about piano recitals we are each attending and I remember all of a sudden that I am going to attend your quintet performance. So definitely will be attending tomorrow afternoon at 3pm. I will come up afterwards and say hi. And no, I will not be the person in the audience following along with the score. (cmb13 dissuaded me from that notion wink )
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
I'm in DC, so this is just across the river. If I come, I'll be sure to come up and say hi.

That'd be great! cool My real name is Simon Finlow, though now I think about it, I'll be the only piano guy there so I should be easy to find.
ha

SiFi: Well, don't think I didn't give it the ole college try. smile I came, tried all the doors and the place was locked up tight as a button on account of the heavy snowfall. So I went a few doors down to the La Trattoria where I had a wonderful pasta dinner, the chef made off-menu specialties just for me as the only customer, and I chatted up a voluble waitress on topics ranging from bitcoins to politics to Asians in America to piano recitals to opera. So not an evening lost. When is the the make-up day for your performance?
Awwww man and here I was looking forward to photos and video!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Awwww man and here I was looking forward to photos and video!

Well, I don't want it to be said I hadn't come prepared to ask SiFi's permission to film it - with my tripod and everything - on the behest of our merry piano party group yesterday smile

In fact, SiFi, do let me know if filming it would be ok when your performance does finally end up being rescheduled smile
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Sounds like kind of a gamble. ha


+1

Extra note:

Managed to avoid gun fire around my house on this Christmas evening as it turned out to be just a few "pops" from leftover 4th of July fireworks that some neighbors have been fooling around with. grin


And, as it is nearly midnight as of now -- everything has settled down. thumb


OT:

@Mark_C:

Did manage to get through this holiday season relatively unscathed (so-to-speak) and there are no other pressing issues going on other than waiting on getting the new Generac generator installed at my house (as a date of Feb. 5th has been set) and this has been a priority for now over buying the Baldwin SF-10 grand.

Will only be going forward with digital pianos only as I intend to eventually trade in the Clavinova CLP-585 for a new AvantGrand N2X should that upgraded model eventually become available.

Otherwise, everything else is a moot point! grin ha
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
SiFi: Well, don't think I didn't give it the ole college try. smile I came, tried all the doors and the place was locked up tight as a button on account of the heavy snowfall. So I went a few doors down to the La Trattoria where I had a wonderful pasta dinner, the chef made off-menu specialties just for me as the only customer, and I chatted up a voluble waitress on topics ranging from bitcoins to politics to Asians in America to piano recitals to opera. So not an evening lost. When is the the make-up day for your performance?

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
SiFi: Well, don't think I didn't give it the ole college try. smile I came, tried all the doors and the place was locked up tight as a button on account of the heavy snowfall. So I went a few doors down to the La Trattoria where I had a wonderful pasta dinner, the chef made off-menu specialties just for me as the only customer, and I chatted up a voluble waitress on topics ranging from bitcoins to politics to Asians in America to piano recitals to opera. So not an evening lost. When is the the make-up day for your performance?

OMG, I'm so sorry! I should have posted something about the cancellation here like I did on Facebook. Thank you Tyrone for being so wonderfully sanguine about the whole thing.

Obviously this was a huge disappointment for all of us, especially since we had a really good dress rehearsal on Saturday. The annoying thing is that FMMC doesn't postpone, they just cancel because their calendar is pretty much set in stone for the entire season. I'm brainstorming possible alternative venues--have a potentially promising one in mind. After 8 months of work, it would be awful not to be able to perform this incredible piece live in recital. I'll keep you in the loop this time. You're obviously a good bloke! So glad there was a voluble waitress on hand to assuage what must have been your considerable frustration. smile smile
Originally Posted by ycdp88
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by gp84
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Sounds like kind of a gamble. ha


+1

Extra note:

Managed to avoid gun fire around my house on this Christmas evening as it turned out to be just a few "pops" from leftover 4th of July fireworks that some neighbors have been fooling around with. grin


And, as it is nearly midnight as of now -- everything has settled down. thumb


OT:

@Mark_C:

Did manage to get through this holiday season relatively unscathed (so-to-speak) and there are no other pressing issues going on other than waiting on getting the new Generac generator installed at my house (as a date of Feb. 5th has been set) and this has been a priority for now over buying the Baldwin SF-10 grand.

Will only be going forward with digital pianos only as I intend to eventually trade in the Clavinova CLP-585 for a new AvantGrand N2X should that upgraded model eventually become available.

Otherwise, everything else is a moot point! grin ha


@Mark_C:

Please note this will be my last post in the forums as "pv88" (i.e., original member) as I am giving my formal apologies to everyone here for now and the reason for having been banned was due to a post in the following thread:

http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/2529867/Physis_Piano.html

Being banned as "pv88" in no way reflects as to who I am (i.e., Richard) outside of these forums since I am now a retired person that will be turning 60 in May. I intend to move forward with trading in a Clavinova CLP-585 towards a new AvantGrand "N2X" digital piano should Yamaha eventually release the new model.

Have decided that an acoustic piano is not going to work out in my old house due to very wide humidity swings and therefore will be playing on digital pianos, only. Getting a Generac generator installed soon (in February) has been a priority as I have had several power outages.

This will be one of my last posts in the forums -- have a good day! grin

[New member name]

"agn2x" means:

a = Avant
g = Grand
n2x = N2X (model name)
Originally Posted by agn2x


@Mark_C:

Please note this will be my last post in the forums as "pv88" (i.e., original member) as I am giving my formal apologies to everyone here for now and the reason for having been banned was due to a post in the following thread:

http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/2529867/Physis_Piano.html

Being banned as "pv88" in no way reflects as to who I am (i.e., Richard) outside of these forums since I am now a retired person that will be turning 60 in May. I intend to move forward with trading in a Clavinova CLP-585 towards a new AvantGrand "N2X" digital piano should Yamaha eventually release the new model.

Have decided that an acoustic piano is not going to work out in my old house due to very wide humidity swings and therefore will be playing on digital pianos, only. Getting a Generac generator installed soon (in February) has been a priority as I have had several power outages.

This will be one of my last posts in the forums -- have a good day! grin

[New member name]

"agn2x" means:

a = Avant
g = Grand
n2x = N2X (model name)


What a long series of goodbyes!
Originally Posted by cmb13

What a long series of goodbyes!


Indeed. That incident was in 2016. Apologies mean nothing when they're just followed by more abuse via PM or e-mail.
Let's get this thread back on track, then smile

Anyone going to any good concerts/recitals in the near future? Or, anyone going to *play* in a recital? We want times and dates and all the rest!

Me:

Ivo Pogorelich, Meistersingerhalle Nuremberg, Germany, 17. Feb 2019 at 8pm (link to program, on the bottom left)
Evgeny Kissin, Musikverein Vienna, Austria, 12. Mar 2019 at 8pm (link to program)
That Kissin program looks great....maybe I'll meet you there. JK a little too far.
Originally Posted by cmb13
That Kissin program looks great....maybe I'll meet you there. JK a little too far.

Dooooo eeeeet, you know you want to!! laugh

Wouldn't that be great, a mini PW gathering at one of the temples of classical music, hehe.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Anyone going to any good concerts/recitals in the near future?

Tonight - Peter Serkin playing the Goldberg Variations (plus two Mozart works). If I feel inspired, I'll post a report here.
Originally Posted by Hank M
Tonight - Peter Serkin playing the Goldberg Variations (plus two Mozart works). If I feel inspired, I'll post a report here.

[Linked Image]

There!
(Are you inspired?) grin

We want it, we want it.....
Originally Posted by Hank M
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Anyone going to any good concerts/recitals in the near future?

Tonight - Peter Serkin playing the Goldberg Variations (plus two Mozart works). If I feel inspired, I'll post a report here.


That would be something to see!
Feb 25th & 26th, I'm going to Martha Argerich in Berlin.
Originally Posted by Hank M
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Anyone going to any good concerts/recitals in the near future?

Tonight - Peter Serkin playing the Goldberg Variations (plus two Mozart works). If I feel inspired, I'll post a report here.

I will be attending. Looking forward to this.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Feb 25th & 26th, I'm going to Martha Argerich in Berlin.


Originally Posted by Sibylle

Ivo Pogorelich, Meistersingerhalle Nuremberg, Germany, 17. Feb 2019 at 8pm (link to program, on the bottom left)
Evgeny Kissin, Musikverein Vienna, Austria, 12. Mar 2019 at 8pm (link to program)


You Europeans have it so much better!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by cmb13
That Kissin program looks great....maybe I'll meet you there. JK a little too far.

Dooooo eeeeet, you know you want to!! laugh

Wouldn't that be great, a mini PW gathering at one of the temples of classical music, hehe.


That would be absolutely spectacular!

I'm holding out for Irina Lankova.
Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Feb 25th & 26th, I'm going to Martha Argerich in Berlin.


Originally Posted by Sibylle

Ivo Pogorelich, Meistersingerhalle Nuremberg, Germany, 17. Feb 2019 at 8pm (link to program, on the bottom left)
Evgeny Kissin, Musikverein Vienna, Austria, 12. Mar 2019 at 8pm (link to program)


You Europeans have it so much better!


Nah. You have New York just up the road! grin
LOL you're right.

Two turns and I'm on i95, 1200 miles to the north, hang a R into the Lincoln Tunnel, hang a L up 7th until I get to 57th, park and walk into Carnegie Hall. 4-5 turns total. Maybe I should just Uber lol smile.

It still seems to me that the best tend to base in Europe, though.
Originally Posted by cmb13
LOL you're right.

Two turns and I'm on i95, 1200 miles to the north, hang a R into the Lincoln Tunnel, hang a L up 7th until I get to 57th, park and walk into Carnegie Hall. 4-5 turns total. Maybe I should just Uber lol smile.

It still seems to me that the best tend to base in Europe, though.



I agree. Europe really does seem to have most of the best concerts there. And most people really don't realize how far most places in the United States are away from New York or any major metropolitan.
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
I agree. Europe really does seem to have most of the best concerts there. And most people really don't realize how far most places in the United States are away from New York or any major metropolitan.

A lot of people don't, that's true. And at the same time, people in America don't realise that "Europeans" are actually people from lots of different countries and it's not always that easy to get to places either smile My going to those two recitals in Feb and March means travelling abroad both times, across half the continent - and even though it might not be all that far in terms of distance, it's air travel because there are a couple of oceans in the way. I wish I could just get in a car and drive to Vienna, but that would take about four days including ferries and everything, haha!

Being "European" isn't what makes it, it very much depends on which country you live in.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
And at the same time, people in America don't realise that "Europeans" are actually people from lots of different countries and it's not always that easy to get to places either smile My going to those two recitals in Feb and March means travelling abroad both times, across half the continent - and even though it might not be all that far in terms of distance, it's air travel because there are a couple of oceans in the way. I wish I could just get in a car and drive to Vienna, but that would take about four days including ferries and everything, haha!
You can't drive, but why would you want to? You can fly from Dublin to Vienna, a distance of 2000 km, sometimes for as low as 28€ (Ryanair), which is less than cmb13 would pay for his gasoline to NYC. Don't want to make my wife into some sort of a "Jetsetter" when ticket prices for the budget airlines are sub-50€, but my wife travels all around Europe sometimes with only her handbag. Going to London from our apartment in Amsterdam is a day trip to her, which here in the US I might drive to a place 2 hours and 200km away. With budget airlines like Ryanair and EasyJet and ridiculously low fares cheaper than the cost of petrol, all parts of Europe are better connected that the continental US.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
You can't drive, but why would you want to? You can fly from Dublin to Vienna, a distance of 2000 km, sometimes for as low as 28€ (Ryanair)...

Unless, of course, you have baggage to check in etc wink Then you can immediately add 70 EUR. Also, Ryanair's flights to "Vienna" actually land in Bratislava, which is in Slovakia instead of Austria and over 2 hours away by train. Of course you need to add the train ticket to the price of the flight, which altogether makes it as least as expensive as you'd pay in your example of driving. Apart from the money you spend for long-term parking at your home airport etc.

Don't get me wrong, I'm doing it, but "it's so much easier in Europe" just isn't true. Everywhere it's easier if you live in a city with a big concert hall or two, an opera etc. Otherwise you need to travel, one way or another, which is time-consuming and more or less expensive.

Serves me right for moving to the shticks, eh? wink
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
You can't drive, but why would you want to? You can fly from Dublin to Vienna, a distance of 2000 km, sometimes for as low as 28€ (Ryanair)...

Unless, of course, you have baggage to check in etc wink Then you can immediately add 70 EUR. Also, Ryanair's flights to "Vienna" actually land in Bratislava, which is in Slovakia instead of Austria and over 2 hours away by train. Of course you need to add the train ticket to the price of the flight, which altogether makes it as least as expensive as you'd pay in your example of driving. Apart from the money you spend for long-term parking at your home airport etc.

Don't get me wrong, I'm doing it, but "it's so much easier in Europe" just isn't true. Everywhere it's easier if you live in a city with a big concert hall or two, an opera etc. Otherwise you need to travel, one way or another, which is time-consuming and more or less expensive.

Serves me right for moving to the shticks, eh? wink

You're right of course. I stand corrected. What I said only applies to going between major cities in Europe. If you are outside a major city, and/or headed to a place outside a major city, then it is more elaborate and expensive, and and depending on the pair of major cities in question, there can be the cost of a connecting train fare.

That said, is there anything outside of major cities? wink (j/k!)
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
That said, is there anything outside of major cities? wink (j/k!)

I move to have top orchestras and soloists play all the small towns next. That should take them a good few years per continent wink I can just see Boris Berezovsky in my nearest town's little "hall", playing on the broken-down old Bechstein grand there... ha
Originally Posted by Sibylle
I can just see Boris Berezovsky in my nearest town's little "hall"

LOL. Coming from the investment banking world, when I think of Boris Berezovsky, I'm thinking of this fellow, and not him. So I started a moment when I thought you were referring to some deceased person!
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Sibylle
I can just see Boris Berezovsky in my nearest town's little "hall"

LOL. Coming from the investment banking world, when I think of Boris Berezovsky, I'm thinking of this fellow, and not him. So I started a moment when I thought you were referring to some deceased person!

Haha! I'm most definitely talking about him! 3hearts
Originally Posted by Hank M
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Anyone going to any good concerts/recitals in the near future?

Tonight - Peter Serkin playing the Goldberg Variations (plus two Mozart works). If I feel inspired, I'll post a report here.

For those interested, I just posted a review.
In Dallas, TX, the Southern Methodist University Owen School of Arts, offers the following:


January 25 – 27, Mini Residency: Dan Tepfer, Jazz Pianist/Composer
Friday, Jan 25 Noon: Chamber Music Class with Julius Quartet
Friday, Jan 25 1pm: Composition Master Class
Saturday, Jan 26 7:30pm: Recital showcasing his “Natural Machines” project
Sunday, Jan 27 2pm: Recital with Julius Quartet, Variations on Goldberg Variations
All events in O'Donnell Hall in Owen Arts Center on Southern Methodist University campus. All events FREE.


February 6, 1pm: Daria Rabotkina: Guest Piano Recital at Caruth Auditorium in Owen Arts Center on Southern Methodist University. FREE.


February 14, 7:30pm, Liudmila Georgievskaya: Valentine’s Day Piano Recital in Caruth Auditorium in the Owen Arts Center on SMU campus, FREE.


February 23, 2019 – 7:30pm: Distinguished Performer Concert Series - Alessio Bax Piano Recital: Italian Inspirations at Caruth Auditorium in Owen Arts Center on Southern Methodist University. $14 for adults, $11 for seniors, $8 for students, faculty & staff.

March 2, 2019 – 7:30pm: Thomas Schwan: Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1. Schwan plays the entire Book 1 of the WTC in Caruth Auditorium of Owen Arts Center on SMU campus, FREE.
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
SiFi: Well, don't think I didn't give it the ole college try. smile I came, tried all the doors and the place was locked up tight as a button on account of the heavy snowfall. So I went a few doors down to the La Trattoria where I had a wonderful pasta dinner, the chef made off-menu specialties just for me as the only customer, and I chatted up a voluble waitress on topics ranging from bitcoins to politics to Asians in America to piano recitals to opera. So not an evening lost. When is the the make-up day for your performance?

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
SiFi: Well, don't think I didn't give it the ole college try. smile I came, tried all the doors and the place was locked up tight as a button on account of the heavy snowfall. So I went a few doors down to the La Trattoria where I had a wonderful pasta dinner, the chef made off-menu specialties just for me as the only customer, and I chatted up a voluble waitress on topics ranging from bitcoins to politics to Asians in America to piano recitals to opera. So not an evening lost. When is the the make-up day for your performance?

OMG, I'm so sorry! I should have posted something about the cancellation here like I did on Facebook. Thank you Tyrone for being so wonderfully sanguine about the whole thing.

Obviously this was a huge disappointment for all of us, especially since we had a really good dress rehearsal on Saturday. The annoying thing is that FMMC doesn't postpone, they just cancel because their calendar is pretty much set in stone for the entire season. I'm brainstorming possible alternative venues--have a potentially promising one in mind. After 8 months of work, it would be awful not to be able to perform this incredible piece live in recital. I'll keep you in the loop this time. You're obviously a good bloke! So glad there was a voluble waitress on hand to assuage what must have been your considerable frustration. smile smile

So, Tyrone, FMMC in an unprecedented move has rescheduled our Brahms quintet for Feb. 3, Super Bowl Sunday. But don't worry, it's only an hour long recital and there'll be plenty of time to get back to where you need to be for the kickoff.

Same time and venue--3:00 PM at the Lyceum in Alexandria. Unfortunately the wind band were not available to perform on the new date, so I will have to fill out the program with some Brahms solo piano music.

Here's the program:

• Brahms: Two Rhapsodies, op. 79. Simon Finlow, piano.
• Brahms: Piano Quintet in F Minor, op. 34. Simon Finlow, piano; Robyn Tessin and Carolyn Esko Carlson, violins; Julia Moline, viola; Valerie Matthews, cello.

And here's the link with all the info (just ignore the picture--that's not us!): http://www.fmmc.org/event/lyceum-concert-series-22/

Would love to see you and all your friends there! I'll be the bloke playing the piano (I think it's a Boston 7 foot, or maybe bigger).
Awww I wish I could beam myself up for that recital, I love Brahms and those Rhapsodies in particular. Would love to hear you, SiFi! I expect a full report, Tyrone Slothrop, d'ya hear me? smile And pictures and maybe even a bit of video?
Originally Posted by SiFi
So, Tyrone, FMMC in an unprecedented move has rescheduled our Brahms quintet for Feb. 3, Super Bowl Sunday. But don't worry, it's only an hour long recital and there'll be plenty of time to get back to where you need to be for the kickoff.

Same time and venue--3:00 PM at the Lyceum in Alexandria. Unfortunately the wind band were not available to perform on the new date, so I will have to fill out the program with some Brahms solo piano music.

Here's the program:

• Brahms: Two Rhapsodies, op. 79. Simon Finlow, piano.
• Brahms: Piano Quintet in F Minor, op. 34. Simon Finlow, piano; Robyn Tessin and Carolyn Esko Carlson, violins; Julia Moline, viola; Valerie Matthews, cello.

And here's the link with all the info (just ignore the picture--that's not us!): http://www.fmmc.org/event/lyceum-concert-series-22/

Would love to see you and all your friends there! I'll be the bloke playing the piano (I think it's a Boston 7 foot, or maybe bigger).

Sounds good. I'll try to be there. Can I film some stuff for your friends back at PW?
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Awww I wish I could beam myself up for that recital, I love Brahms and those Rhapsodies in particular. Would love to hear you, SiFi! I expect a full report, Tyrone Slothrop, d'ya hear me? smile And pictures and maybe even a bit of video?

I would love it if someone could do video! We'll probably have a professional quality audio recording, at least for the quintet. I don't think any of the string players are union members, so feel free to record at will.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Sounds good. I'll try to be there. Can I film some stuff for your friends back at PW?

No objections at all to the recording. Hope to see you there. Bring friends!!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
expect a full report, Tyrone Slothrop, d'ya hear me? smile And pictures and maybe even a bit of video?

Yeah yeah. Will bring my tripod w/ me and record a video. smile
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Sibylle
expect a full report, Tyrone Slothrop, d'ya hear me? smile And pictures and maybe even a bit of video?

Yeah yeah. Will bring my tripod w/ me and record a video. smile


I too, am looking forward to watching the video!
For those in Northeast Ohio, Garrick Ohlsson will be performing Busoni's Piano Concerto with the Cleveland Orchestra under the direction of Alan Gilbert February 7-9 at Severance Hall. I saw Ohlsson play the Busoni back around 1990 and, well, I still have to pick up my jaw from the floor when hearing the recording.

Hank
In case anyone is interested, in the Washington DC area, there will be a program called "Extreme Chopin" at the Strathmore in Bethesda, Maryland on Saturday (2/2) evening at 8pm. The Washington Post has a review here of the pianist and the program.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
In case anyone is interested, in the Washington DC area, there will be a program called "Extreme Chopin" at the Strathmore in Bethesda, Maryland on Saturday (2/2) evening at 8pm. The Washington Post has a review here of the pianist and the program.

Interesting, especially about that mazurka for unaccompanied singer.

But, it this thing in there means what it seems to mean:

"As far as we know, Brian’s the first pianist to attempt this,” says National Philharmonic music director Piotr Gajewski, who pitched the idea to Ganz in 2009.

.....it's wrong, at least sort of wrong.

Alexander Brailowsky pretty famously did a series of concerts, I think in the 1920's, of Chopin's complete works, which of course would have been only the works known at that time to exist. I think that series was put forth as the first time this was being done.
I'd be surprised if others since then haven't done it too.
Trying to arrange to go to Zurich next Sunday to see Beatrice Rana play Beethoven's third concerto (anyone?:)).

Originally Posted by Sibylle
And at the same time, people in America don't realise that "Europeans" are actually people from lots of different countries and it's not always that easy to get to places either smile


I agree:( I moved here (southwest Germany) a few months ago, to a music school in a tiny town that you need to zoom in hard on the map to find, and the connections from and to this place are usually difficult and end up being long and expensive for a student- definitely not something you can do regularly if you don't have a car. When I was in the US for two years I had it so much better, all in one city (Cincinnati), which had so much to offer I didn't then realize how lucky I was- I saw Grimaud, Lupu, Uchida, Mutter, Tetzlaff, Shaham, Fliter, Tokyo Quartet, Pavo Jaarvi, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Mahler symphonies, Verdi and Britten requiems, and so much more. Here I am much more concert-deprived and still can't make peace with the fact that I've managed to see just one outside of school in the last four months (Ebene Quartet in Beethoven and Brahms). But winter break is coming up and I will be arranging all my travels around concerts- I can't wait! (Bachtrack.com is a website I use often- you can search by city, by performer, or by piece).
Jean Rondeau at The Wigmore, London, June 11, 2019.

Angela Hewitt at The Wigmore, London, June 13, 2019.

I may go to one or both of these events.

I've never heard of Rondeau, but his performance promises to be hair-raising.
Originally Posted by Hank M

I've never heard of Rondeau, but his performance promises to be hair-raising.

whome
I’ve just booked tickets to see comedian turned pianist Alistair McGowan in Leeds in April.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/alistair-mcgowan-introductions-to-classical-piano-tickets-55627832344

It promises to be an entertaining evening and a useful insight as to what can be achieved by a late starter who now has an album and piano tour to his name.



Originally Posted by SiFi
Would love to see you and all your friends there! I'll be the bloke playing the piano (I think it's a Boston 7 foot, or maybe bigger).

And this wonderful performance has now been posted over here!
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by SiFi
Would love to see you and all your friends there! I'll be the bloke playing the piano (I think it's a Boston 7 foot, or maybe bigger).

And this wonderful performance has now been posted over here!


Well worth watching!
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
And how's this for an unusual concert, also in Zankel.

https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calendar/2019/02/05/Leon-Fleisher-and-Friends-0730PM

Leon Fleischer's 90th birthday celebration. He'll do some solo stuff and some 4 hand stuff with some former students, including Jonathan Biss, Yefim Bronfman, Katherine Jacobson, and a 'surprise guest'.




This is tonight, by the way!
Very nice live, online recital going on right now by Tanya Gabrielian.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

Yes, I am watching/listening now.
I got two tickets for Dudamel & Yuja Wang, La Phil, Walt Disney Concert Hall. Saturday March 9th. Should be exciting smile
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
I got two tickets for Dudamel & Yuja Wang, La Phil, Walt Disney Concert Hall. Saturday March 9th. Should be exciting smile

How exciting for you! You will need to post your thoughts after the concert.
People have asked me for my personal (and make no mistake, it *is* going to be very personal) review of the Ivo Pogorelich recital in Nuremberg last Sunday. So here goes!

I walked in when they opened the doors, and as I’d hoped, he was there at the piano playing, in baggy clothes, red socks (! lol) and a woolly hat. There were hardly any people inside at that time, so I sat down in the second block, not wanting to disturb him, and just watched and listened. He played a few shorter pieces and then a repeating phrase of what was plainly just freestyle practice, a sequence of fifths. I have to say, I enjoyed that immensely - I mean: How often do you witness a master practising?

When the room filled, he disappeared and then came back wearing the traditional tux (suit? I know the word in German, but how do you call the thing pianists wear?). I managed to grab a seat that was much better than the one I'd got a ticket for - 2nd row left, so he was only about 12 feet away and I had a perfect view of his right hand, and the left too at times. Yessssss!

Mozart was first, the Adagio b minor (K540). He played it extremely slowly, but not obnoxiously so. It was also highly unconventional, with liberal use of rubato and some forte that should have been piano according to the sheet music (which I know because I’m practising this thing right now!). The critics are going to roast him for it, and I don't think the traditionalists amongst ye here in the Pianist Corner would have liked it, either. But it made sense, it was a coherent, highly sensitive interpretation, and achingly beautiful.

Then the Liszt sonata b minor, oh my gods. The whole program was incredible, but this was definitely my highlight. It was ravishing, gorgeous, daring, tempestuous - and once again the slower parts were very slow. He has in the past played annoyingly slowly sometimes, but this was different. It was simply unhurried, deliberately savouring each note. If I've learned anything from him that evening, it's this: There's no hurry.

Then came the break and then Schumann’s Symphonic Etudes. I loved hearing the posthumous variations that I’d never heard from him before, and comparing the rest of them to his recording from the early 80s. Back then, some of them were played mostly as etudes - with focus on the virtuosity - but this time around, he played it with (even) more musical expression.

People obviously loved it, and yet nobody gave him standing ovations. „Why is nobody standing?“ I whispered to a couple in front of me. I got them to stand up with me, and he actually gave us a nod before he announced he was going to play a Liszt for an encore. Which I've been unable to identify, gaaaaah!! It's been driving me nuts all week.

All in all, he is definitely back at the top of his game. I had expected a lot, but he still blew my expectations out of the water. I just wish I could rewind to Sunday evening around 7pm and do it all over.

After all those years of not being to any live concerts or recitals, I had almost forgotten the magic of having him there in front of me, live, playing. No YouTube video could have prepared me for this! I was bowled over. He still does that to me, 31 years later grin And I guess he still is my favourite pianist (well, together with Kissin), among the many I adore and admire.

I'm so glad I went, even though it was hard to be on my own afterwards, when that was the time I'd usually have a drink with Eveline and happily dissect every note and talk for hours. But I was right, I couldn't have gone to this particular recital with anyone else. Vienna will be different next month smile
P.S. He played the Mozart *without crossing over*!! No idea how he did that?!
I am glad you had a fantastic time! Thank you for the detailed review.
I also idolize some of Pogorelich's performances, and I am deeply happy for you that you got to witness him playing live! Especially given his personal importance to you and the significance of your return to hearing live music. Know that we are happy for you!
Sara Daneshpour coming to a Steinway gallery in my town. I had not heard of her but her bio seems impressive, a her Gaspard de la Nuit seems pretty solid.
A few upcoming highlights in the old world:

Evgeny Kissin in the Vienna Musikverein, Austria, 12. March (and guess who’s got a really good ticket?! *happydance*).

Yuja Wang and Birmingham Symphony in the Alte Oper in Frankfurt, Germany, 14. May. Schumann Piano Concerto! Man, I wish I could be there.

In summer in Northern Germany, the Schleswig-Holstein Musikfestival promises to be amazing, with recitals by both Kissin playing Beethoven sonatas on 8. July (another one I’d probably kill and possibly die to get to) and Pogorelich on 27. August (I may just about get a few days off then).
Originally Posted by Sibylle
A few upcoming highlights in the old world:

Evgeny Kissin in the Vienna Musikverein, Austria, 12. March (and guess who’s got a really good ticket?! *happydance*).

Yuja Wang and Birmingham Symphony in the Alte Oper in Frankfurt, Germany, 14. May. Schumann Piano Concerto! Man, I wish I could be there.

In summer in Northern Germany, the Schleswig-Holstein Musikfestival promises to be amazing, with recitals by both Kissin playing Beethoven sonatas on 8. July (another one I’d probably kill and possibly die to get to) and Pogorelich on 27. August (I may just about get a few days off then).

Wow, they all sound like they will be amazing concerts. I sure wish I could attend.
Sybille that sounds amazing!

I suppose I should review Martha Argerich in Berlin now! As if I need an excuse.

I saw her twice playing Prokofiev 3 with Daniel Barenboim conducting the Staatskapelle Berlin.

The first night was in the Staatsoper. I was in the tenth row. She walked out looking nervous and sat down at the piano. The first thing that hit me was the clarity. The way she was adding extra accents to some notes made the piano stand out from the orchestra, yet there was an amazing balance between the two. I heard wonderful things in Prokofiev's writing I had never heard before. Somehow, in spite of knowing the concerto for decades it was like hearing it for the first time. It made sense in a completely different way.

The second night was at the Philharmonie. I was in the front row on the right, and I thought my seat would be terrible, but at the first note she sounded so exciting I was giggling inside. I had a huge grin on my face. This sounded more like her recordings, but there was incredible fluidity in her sound, and her ability to make every note sound fresh was awe-inspiring. I felt this performance had more virtuoso sparkle than the first, which was all about tone colour for me. Two utterly amazing concerts.

I've been a huge fan of Martha Argerich for decades, and have lost count of the number of times I've heard this concerto played by great pianists, but this was something different entirely. I didn't realise how good she was. And this is woman is 77!

She and Daniel Barenboim played a Bizet duet as an encore, and it was so sweet. It was all the years melted away for these two childhood friends.

The opening piece was Schubert's Unfinished Symphony and sounded beautiful at the Staatsoper, but more brilliant and spacious at the Philharmonie. It's such an amazing venue. The second half was the Babylon Suite by Joerg Widmann. The scoring was amazing.
Oh how jealous I am of the concerts you have lined up Sybille! I've never actually been to Vienna, so I'm planning to see someone in the Musikverein next year. I haven't decided on next year's pianist!

I still haven't seen Krystian Zimerman...
Gods, that sounds amazing. Martha Argerich is one pianist I've never known to "lapse" or have a less brilliant phase in her entire life. She's just always been consistently outstanding. Thanks for the review!
I saw Dudamel and Yuja Wang last night at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. It was a great show. We sat in the orchestra view section, where you sit behind the orchestra and get a straight view of the conductor. It was pretty interesting to watch his facial expressions during show. These seats are significantly cheaper than the front orchestra seats. I'd recommend trying them sometime. Actually, I think any seat in this concert hall would be good, except those way high up. We had binoculars and so I would zoom in to see Yuja's hand, or peek at the sheet music.

The first part was a composition called "Must the Devil Have All The Good Tunes", composed by John Adams. This week was the world premiere of that. Yuja played during that part, and then came out for an encore solo performance after that. I wish I knew what that piece was!

After the intermission, it was just the orchestra, no piano. They played Symphony No. 1 in D Major (Mahler). It was really nice!

Einaudi will be playing here in June smile

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Very cook, B#!
The encore was "China Gates", also written by John Adams a few years ago.
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
The encore was "China Gates", also written by John Adams a few years ago.


And sounds like a wonderful concert. Thanks for the review!
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Originally Posted by Mark_C
... or Beatrice Rana or ...

In Zankel hall in March. I've got seats in the front row!

......and now we're in too. smile
(We'll be a few rows behind you.)

Thank you!!



A preview of tomorrow's concert, courtesy of WQXR.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrFNWSbZtOA


I think there are still tickets left if anyone's interested.
At the Royal Festival Hall in London tomorrow, I am going to hear Maurizio Pollini. He was a favourite of my mother's (via recordings), but up to now I have never seen him live. This is the programme:

Chopin: 2 Nocturnes, Op.62; Polonaise in F sharp minor, Op.44; Mazurka in C minor, Op.56 No.3; Berceuse in D flat, Op.57; Scherzo No.3 in C sharp minor, Op.39

Debussy: Préludes, Book 1

Quick “review” of Evgeny Kissin tonight at the Vienna Musikverein.

First of all, I had one of the best seats in the house, I couldn’t believe it: Right next to him very slightly to the left, he was literally five feet away! And the ticket cost me all of 41 EUR - ask me again if it was worth it joining the Musikverein and getting first pick of the tickets a week before everyone else! grin

I really got to watch his technique. His idiosynchracies are getting more pronounced the older he gets, he often sits hunched over the keys and he makes a lot of “hm!” sounds as he plays (other than Ivo Pogorelich, who just breathes very loudly). I find it interesting, but I honestly don’t give a toss - as long as he plays like this, he can do what he likes. And if all this sounds a little cramped, his hands belie the intensity: they’re dancing across the keyboard, seemingly caressing it - quite literally too in case of the glissandi in Debussy’s Feux D’artifice.

Here’s the program. I won’t review the individual pieces for fear of endlessly repeating myself: Everything instantly became my (new) reference version. My personal highlights were the Schumann sonata, which I love anyway - gods, you should have heard that fourth movement, I fell even more in love with it tonight - and the Scriabin.

Easily the most outstanding thing for me was to witness (literally, because I was so close) his absolute control of the dynamics. Slipping back and forth between a powerful forte and the most delicate pianissimo with an almost surreal ease and of course, without ever “ghosting” any notes (damn him).

So that’s what I learned from my two very different all-time favourites this past month:

Pogorelich - 1. There’s no hurry, 2. Every single note has a purpose.
Kissin: 1. Control is light, featherlight in fact, 2. Dynamics make or break it.

He played four encores and I liked that he went for popularity over virtuosity (after all, the program itself didn’t exactly consist of “crowd pleasers”):

1. Schumann, Traeumerei
2. Debussy, Golliwog’s Cake Walk
3. Chopin, Valse Brilliante op. 34/2 in A flat major (when he announced a Chopin waltz, I hoped for “my” waltz for a moment, the one I’m currently practising, op. 62/2 - but I’m not complaining, it was beautiful!)
4. his own composition “Dodecaphonic Tango”, which frankly knocked my socks off - it’s not fair, can he be anything other than brilliant at something??

I was very lucky to have this amazing seat, as well as lovely “neighbours” around me, who all were as blown away as I was, including one music critic! Seriously, it doesn’t get any better than the way he played tonight.

The audience couldn’t have been more different from the one in Nuremberg three weeks ago: From the first encore onwards, the entire room was on their feet for every new round of applause.

To top it all off, I ran into him and his group of friends in a cafe afterwards grin I got to shake his hand and thank him, and we actually chatted for a minute or so. He’s completely unassuming, friendly, and funny, and not that that’s important to the way he plays the piano, but it’s still lovely and warms my heart.

And that’s it! What a highlight of this trip! I’m completely wrecked now, off to bed I go.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Quick “review” of Evgeny Kissin tonight at the Vienna Musikverein.

First of all, I had one of the best seats in the house, I couldn’t believe it: Right next to him very slightly to the left, he was literally five feet away! And the ticket cost me all of 41 EUR - ask me again if it was worth it joining the Musikverein and getting first pick of the tickets a week before everyone else! grin

I really got to watch his technique. His idiosynchracies are getting more pronounced the older he gets, he often sits hunched over the keys and he makes a lot of “hm!” sounds as he plays (other than Ivo Pogorelich, who just breathes very loudly). I find it interesting, but I honestly don’t give a toss - as long as he plays like this, he can do what he likes. And if all this sounds a little cramped, his hands belie the intensity: they’re dancing across the keyboard, seemingly caressing it - quite literally too in case of the glissandi in Debussy’s Feux D’artifice.

Here’s the program. I won’t review the individual pieces for fear of endlessly repeating myself: Everything instantly became my (new) reference version. My personal highlights were the Schumann sonata, which I love anyway - gods, you should have heard that fourth movement, I fell even more in love with it tonight - and the Scriabin.

Easily the most outstanding thing for me was to witness (literally, because I was so close) his absolute control of the dynamics. Slipping back and forth between a powerful forte and the most delicate pianissimo with an almost surreal ease and of course, without ever “ghosting” any notes (damn him).

So that’s what I learned from my two very different all-time favourites this past month:

Pogorelich - 1. There’s no hurry, 2. Every single note has a purpose.
Kissin: 1. Control is light, featherlight in fact, 2. Dynamics make or break it.

He played four encores and I liked that he went for popularity over virtuosity (after all, the program itself didn’t exactly consist of “crowd pleasers”):

1. Schumann, Traeumerei
2. Debussy, Golliwog’s Cake Walk
3. Chopin, Valse Brilliante op. 34/2 in A flat major (when he announced a Chopin waltz, I hoped for “my” waltz for a moment, the one I’m currently practising, op. 62/2 - but I’m not complaining, it was beautiful!)
4. his own composition “Dodecaphonic Tango”, which frankly knocked my socks off - it’s not fair, can he be anything other than brilliant at something??

I was very lucky to have this amazing seat, as well as lovely “neighbours” around me, who all were as blown away as I was, including one music critic! Seriously, it doesn’t get any better than the way he played tonight.

The audience couldn’t have been more different from the one in Nuremberg three weeks ago: From the first encore onwards, the entire room was on their feet for every new round of applause.

To top it all off, I ran into him and his group of friends in a cafe afterwards grin I got to shake his hand and thank him, and we actually chatted for a minute or so. He’s completely unassuming, friendly, and funny, and not that that’s important to the way he plays the piano, but it’s still lovely and warms my heart.

And that’s it! What a highlight of this trip! I’m completely wrecked now, off to bed I go.


What a fantastic experience! Lucky you!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
To top it all off, I ran into him and his group of friends in a cafe afterwards grin I got to shake his hand and thank him, and we actually chatted for a minute or so. He’s completely unassuming, friendly, and funny, and not that that’s important to the way he plays the piano, but it’s still lovely and warms my heart.

What an awesome way to cap off a magical evening. Sounds like your visit to Vienna this time has been a rousing success! grin
Absolutely amazing experience!!! It sounds almost surreal, indescribable to see a master in Vienna. How utterly amazing!
Wow! It's amazing that you met him afterwards! What was the cafe -for future reference? laugh

I love his Schumann. I would give anything to hear his rendition of the third sonata!
About Beatrice Rana's recital tonight at Carnegie's Zankel Hall:

It was great to meet Jon. We spoke quite a bit before the concert and at intermission.

I loved her playing. The only downer (don't worry y'all, this isn't serious, it's stupid humor) grin was that I couldn't help thinking that if there are five people like this in the Boston amateur competition (in June), I have no chance to make the finals no matter how well I play. ha
My wife said don't worry, there aren't five people like this in the world. I think I agree.

I looked to see if any reviews appear online yet, and they don't, BUT, I see that she recently played the same program in Boston and then in Chicago, and, you can't imagine two more different reviews. The Boston reviewer loved her; the Chicago reviewer not so much -- like, get a load of this thing he said: "Rana needs either to learn to play deeply into the keys in high-decibel, high-energy music or stay away from scores that demand a sound she cannot yet produce."
I can't believe anyone would see fit to say she "needs to learn" anything.

The Boston reviewer, amidst the love, did offer a criticism ("The sound of the grand piano sometimes skewed toward bottom heaviness"), and I felt somewhat the same thing. It was the only aspect where I felt it could have been even greater, and I wondered if maybe it was that the piano was too big or too bright for the hall, which BTW was a chronic thing for almost every pianist in the old Carnegie Recital Hall (I put this in the past tense because I haven't been there in years; I think it's now called Weill Recital Hall). She did beautiful and wonderful things with both melody and accompaniment, basically all the time, but I often wished the accompaniment were more subdued.

Here are links to those two reviews:
Chicago
Boston
Originally Posted by Mark_C
About Beatrice Rana's recital tonight at Carnegie's Zankel Hall:

It was great to meet Jon. We spoke quite a bit before the concert and at intermission.

I loved her playing. The only downer (don't worry y'all, this isn't serious, it's stupid humor) grin was that I couldn't help thinking that if there are five people like this in the Boston amateur competition (in June), I have no chance to make the finals no matter how well I play. ha
My wife said don't worry, there aren't five people like this in the world. I think I agree.

I looked to see if any reviews appear online yet, and they don't, BUT, I see that she recently played the same program in Boston and then in Chicago, and, you can't imagine two more different reviews. The Boston reviewer loved her; the Chicago reviewer not so much -- like, get a load of this thing he said: "Rana needs either to learn to play deeply into the keys in high-decibel, high-energy music or stay away from scores that demand a sound she cannot yet produce."
I can't believe anyone would see fit to say she "needs to learn" anything.

The Boston reviewer, amidst the love, did offer a criticism ("The sound of the grand piano sometimes skewed toward bottom heaviness"), and I felt somewhat the same thing. It was the only aspect where I felt it could have been even greater, and I wondered if maybe it was that the piano was too big or too bright for the hall, which BTW was a chronic thing for almost every pianist in the old Carnegie Recital Hall (I put this in the past tense because I haven't been there in years; I think it's now called Weill Recital Hall). She did beautiful and wonderful things with both melody and accompaniment, basically all the time, but I often wished the accompaniment were more subdued.

Here are links to those two reviews:
Chicago
Boston


I love reading the reviews posted by PW members. Keep them coming please!
Link for NY Times review of Beatrice Rana

He liked her as well as I did. What he says about the Chopin is (IMO) spot-on, and totally divergent from what the Chicago reviewer felt.

I do think some criticism of the balance of melody and accompaniment in the Chopin (not in the other pieces!) would be well taken, although the NY Times review makes no such mention.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Link for NY Times review of Beatrice Rana

He liked her as well as I did. What he says about the Chopin is (IMO) spot-on, and totally divergent from what the Chicago reviewer felt.

I do think some criticism of the balance of melody and accompaniment in the Chopin (not in the other pieces!) would be well taken, although the NY Times review makes no such mention.


Thanks again.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Link for NY Times review of Beatrice Rana

He liked her as well as I did. What he says about the Chopin is (IMO) spot-on, and totally divergent from what the Chicago reviewer felt.

I do think some criticism of the balance of melody and accompaniment in the Chopin (not in the other pieces!) would be well taken, although the NY Times review makes no such mention.


I'm starting to wonder if the Chicago atmosphere isn't a bit staunch as far as their musical convictions, or maybe just the Tribune's reviewers. Anyways, it's kinda fun. Reminds one the picky reviewers of the past.

Originally Posted by David-G
At the Royal Festival Hall in London tomorrow, I am going to hear Maurizio Pollini. He was a favourite of my mother's (via recordings), but up to now I have never seen him live. This is the programme:

Chopin: 2 Nocturnes, Op.62; Polonaise in F sharp minor, Op.44; Mazurka in C minor, Op.56 No.3; Berceuse in D flat, Op.57; Scherzo No.3 in C sharp minor, Op.39

Debussy: Préludes, Book 1




I see him at Carnegie on April 7th with Brahms and Schumann in place of the Debussy.

BRAHMS Three Intermezzos, Op. 117
SCHUMANN Piano Sonata No. 3
CHOPIN Nocturnes, Op. 62
CHOPIN Polonaise in F-sharp Minor, Op. 44
CHOPIN Berceuse in D-flat Major, Op. 57
CHOPIN Scherzo No. 3 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 39
Although mentioned in the ABF thread, Einaudi has several US concerts coming up (and one in Canada).


31 MAY 2019: Washington, DC – US

01 JUNE 2019: Philadelphia, PA – US

04 JUNE 2019: New York, NY – US

06 JUNE 2019: Chicago, IL – US

08 JUNE 2019: Denver, CO – US

11 JUNE 2019: San Francisco, CA – US

14 JUNE 2019: San Diego, CA – US

16 JUNE 2019: Los Angeles, CA – US

18 JUNE 2019: Seattle, WA – US

19 JUNE 2019: Vancouver, BC – CAN
This week, we'll get an actual pianist in the West of Ireland! It's a very rare occurence, I can tell you, and I'm definitely going.

I hope this link works... I've tried to link before, but can't seem to get a link for the actual event, only a general page about the festival. Anyway, it's on the 29th and it's Alexander Ardakov!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
This week, we'll get an actual pianist in the West of Ireland! It's a very rare occurence, I can tell you, and I'm definitely going.

I hope this link works... I've tried to link before, but can't seem to get a link for the actual event, only a general page about the festival. Anyway, it's on the 29th and it's Alexander Ardakov!

Wonderful Sibylle, and you aren't even going to have to do a Plane, Trains, and Automobiles to get to the concert. Do tell us how the performance is! smile
Originally Posted by Sibylle
This week, we'll get an actual pianist in the West of Ireland! It's a very rare occurence, I can tell you, and I'm definitely going.

I hope this link works... I've tried to link before, but can't seem to get a link for the actual event, only a general page about the festival. Anyway, it's on the 29th and it's Alexander Ardakov!

Good for you! And, coincidentally, we will be getting a pianist from Ireland in April. Finghin Collins, a former student of John O'Connor, will be performing at the Washington Conservatory April 20th. Tyrone Slothrop, you may be interested in this: http://www.washingtonconservatory.org/html/concerts1819_collins.htm

Hope you enjoy hearing Mr. Ardakov, Sibylle. Let us know how it goes!
The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's piano series often includes some well-known names (Andras Schiff, Marc-Andre Hamelin, Mitsuko Uchida) but occasionally features an "unknown" pianist of high quality. Such is the case with Hungarian pianist Denes Varjon. I first heard him in recital in 2016 and he was outstanding, so I'm looking forward to his next recital on April 5. If you're in the Philadelphia area (or plan to visit) at that time, come to this recital!

Denes Varjon recital - April 5 2019
Thanks, guys. SiFi, I've never even heard of Finghin Collins, you'll have to tell us all about it afterwards.

So I went to Ardakov's recital in a little church in the middle of nowhere in East Co Clare on Friday. It was a little bizarre! I enjoyed it immensely, although he's certainly no Kissin. But I wasn't going to sit there and dissect every note - who am I anyway to criticise anyone of that calibre.

And in fairness, the program was one it would be very hard to please me with. All three of my favourite composers, including my favourite sonata! There's not much I'm more critical about.

Again, it was lovely overall, although I have to say, his Chopin isn't my Chopin, a lot of it was just - loud. The Tempest sonata was interesting, I've never heard the second movement so fast, and it was very good, although again not my cup of tea in terms of interpretation. Then again, the Tempest sonata has been a done deal for me since the 16th of March 1988, so maybe I should just be quiet, haha.

In contrast, I loved the Scarlatti and especially the Rachmaninov and the Schumann. All the sensitivity I missed in the Chopin pieces, was present here. He played a number of encores, among them "Wedding Day in Troldhaugen" by Grieg, and since I'm in a bit of a Grieg phase right now, this was right up my alley! I managed to talk to him for a bit afterwards, and he's a lovely guy.

I asked him why he plays sitting on a chair like that. He said he likes to sit low! I made my friend take a picture of it, because I knew I had to show it to you guys and you wouldn't believe me without evidence grin When I first came in, I thought, wow, they forgot to put the piano stool there - and then it turned out he prefers this:

[Linked Image]

Now I've seen it all! ha
Originally Posted by SiFi
And, coincidentally, we will be getting a pianist from Ireland in April. Finghin Collins, a former student of John O'Connor, will be performing at the Washington Conservatory April 20th. Tyrone Slothrop, you may be interested in this: http://www.washingtonconservatory.org/html/concerts1819_collins.htm


I hope you enjoy! I have seen him play a few times, though not recently, and always have always enjoyed his performances.
Anecdote time - I took a Russian class with him about 25 years ago. He was 18 at the time, which seemed very young to me as I was the ripe old age of 23 :-)
It was unexpected when he told us during the intros that he was going to be a concert pianist! The rest of us had much more mundane reasons for being there. He was a lovely guy, so I've always been rooting for his success in what is such a competitive field.
Hello Americans! I just discovered that Kissin has a few upcoming recitals in the US in May, some of them with the exact same program that I just heard from him.

Tour Schedule

Needless to say, I warmly recommend it. The way he plays that Schumann sonata... and the Scriabin... oh my.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Hello Americans! I just discovered that Kissin has a few upcoming recitals in the US in May, some of them with the exact same program that I just heard from him.

Tour Schedule

Needless to say, I warmly recommend it. The way he plays that Schumann sonata... and the Scriabin... oh my.

I see that the tour schedule includes several of his 2020 concerts, but it doesn't include his Philadelphia all-Beethoven recital on May 14, 2020. This is actually being presented as a "special event" by the Philadelphia Orchestra; that's why the note about the Orchestra appears at the end. This will definitely be on my calendar:
Quote
BeethovenNOW: Solo Piano Recital with Evgeny Kissin
Evgeny Kissin - Piano

PROGRAM
Beethoven - Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 (“Pathétique”)

Beethoven - Fifteen Variations and a Fugue on an Original Theme in E-flat major, Op. 35 (“Eroica”)

Beethoven - Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2

Beethoven - Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”)

Thursday, May 14, 2020
7:30 PM
VERIZON HALL
In a season presenting all nine of Beethoven's symphonies, and all five of his piano concertos, we can't ignore his solo piano pieces, some of the most unforgettable music ever written. From the “Pathétique” with its echoes of Mozart to the “Eroica” Variations, using thematic material from his Third Symphony, to the innovative D-minor and the heroic and technically challenging “Waldstein,” this brief survey underscores yet again Beethoven's monumental musical genius. The internationally acclaimed virtuoso Evgeny Kissin performs these masterpieces.

Please note: The Philadelphia Orchestra does not perform on this concert.
Originally Posted by Hank M
I see that the tour schedule includes several of his 2020 concerts, but it doesn't include his Philadelphia all-Beethoven recital on May 14, 2020. This is actually being presented as a "special event" by the Philadelphia Orchestra; that's why the note about the Orchestra appears at the end. This will definitely be on my calendar:

Yes, mine too! I can't let him play my favourite sonata without me hearing it! I'm just agonising over where I'll see it, because there's no way I can get to Vienna in January. Maybe I'll catch him in London instead, or in Luxemburg if I can find a cheap flight smile
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by Hank M
I see that the tour schedule includes several of his 2020 concerts, but it doesn't include his Philadelphia all-Beethoven recital on May 14, 2020. This is actually being presented as a "special event" by the Philadelphia Orchestra; that's why the note about the Orchestra appears at the end. This will definitely be on my calendar:

Yes, mine too! I can't let him play my favourite sonata without me hearing it! I'm just agonising over where I'll see it, because there's no way I can get to Vienna in January. Maybe I'll catch him in London instead, or in Luxemburg if I can find a cheap flight smile


I think it's time for a return visit to Dublin. He hasn't been here since 2012!
So here's an interesting one - Nobuyuki Tsujii at Carnegie Hall on Friday May 10th.

You may remember him from the 2009 Cliburn - he shared the gold. He's completely blind and learns 'by ear'. At the Cliburn I remember he played the Hammerklavier in the final round. All those leaps. Just wow.


Anyway, Murray Peraih was supposed to play on May 10th but pulled out for health reasons. So now Nobuyuki Tsujii will be there instead.

A program full of personal favorites:

SATIE Trois Gymnopédies

DEBUSSY Images, Book I

RAVEL Sonatine

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 1

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 2

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 3

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 4


I bought my tickets just yesterday and got two in a first tier box, keyboard side. So there are still good seats to be had.
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Nobuyuki Tsujii at Carnegie Hall on Friday May 10th......

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 2

Please do me a favor: Let us know how the heck he does that leap in the last measure! grin

(I don't just mean how well he does it: I mean how he seems to go about it at all.)

There are leaps all over that piece, as well as the others, but that's the one I really would wonder about.)
I wanted to give people a heads up about the Xavier University Music Series: https://www.xavier.edu/musicseries/

If you are interested in solo piano concerts by high-caliber artists in an intimate setting, I don't think I've come across better in the midwest. The series is a wonderful mix between big names (like Stephen Hough, Barry Douglas, Simone Dinnerstein), up-and-coming artists like Anderson and Roe, and even mixes in competition winners and younger artists. This season I have really enjoyed Sara Davis Buechner's concert, as well as Pianoworld's own Brendan Kinesella with a wonderful Bach program.

The next one I am looking forward to is Frederic Chiu on April 28th. There are not many venues in the midwest that bring in these kind of names for smaller concerts, and I have learned a lot by attending.
Originally Posted by computerpro3
I wanted to give people a heads up about the Xavier University Music Series: https://www.xavier.edu/musicseries/

If you are interested in solo piano concerts by high-caliber artists in an intimate setting, I don't think I've come across better in the midwest. The series is a wonderful mix between big names (like Stephen Hough, Barry Douglas, Simone Dinnerstein), up-and-coming artists like Anderson and Roe, and even mixes in competition winners and younger artists. This season I have really enjoyed Sara Davis Buechner's concert, as well as Pianoworld's own Brendan Kinesella with a wonderful Bach program.

The next one I am looking forward to is Frederic Chiu on April 28th. There are not many venues in the midwest that bring in these kind of names for smaller concerts, and I have learned a lot by attending.


I have always enjoyed listening to Frederic Chiu. His Rossini: Sins of Old Age is especially enjoyable.
I just got back from the Chiu performance and I think it was the most remarkable live concert I have heard in a couple of years. It was all all-Prokofiev program, including sonatas 2, 3, 7, Romeo and Juliet selections, his own transcription of Lieutenant Kije (amazing), and Suggestions Diabolique for an encore. I have never heard such nuanced, musical, and overall remarkable Prokofiev played live.

If you have a chance to see Chiu playing Prokofiev, just do it.
Originally Posted by computerpro3
I just got back from the Chiu performance and I think it was the most remarkable live concert I have heard in a couple of years. It was all all-Prokofiev program, including sonatas 2, 3, 7, Romeo and Juliet selections, his own transcription of Lieutenant Kije (amazing), and Suggestions Diabolique for an encore. I have never heard such nuanced, musical, and overall remarkable Prokofiev played live.

If you have a chance to see Chiu playing Prokofiev, just do it.


I hope I get the opportunity in the future!
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by Orange Soda King
Can we plug our own upcoming concerts, or should that be a different thread?

It depends.

For example:

Yours, yes.
Mine, no. ha

I'm making an exception to that. grin

I'm playing a recital (free) next week at the great little auditorium of a local music school:
Wednesday, May 8, 7 PM
Music Conservatory of Westchester
(216 Central Ave., White Plains, NY -- right near the north end of Central Ave., next door to the City Limits Diner)

It's to help prepare for the Boston amateur competition, which is June 5-8.

Program:
Schubert Impromptu in A-flat major (the "slow" one, from the second set)
Chopin Etude in F minor, Op. 25 #2
Scriabin Etude in B-flat minor, Op. 8 #11
Beethoven Sonata in F-sharp major, Op. 78
Scriabin Sonata #10
---------------
Chopin Polonaise in F-sharp minor
Schubert "little" A major Sonata (D. 664)

Would love to have any of you all come!
(You might be the only ones there.) grin
Originally Posted by Mark_C
I'm playing a recital (free) next week at the great little auditorium of a local music school:
Wednesday, May 8, 7 PM
Music Conservatory of Westchester

(216 Central Ave., White Plains, NY -- right near the north end of Central Ave., next door to the City Limits Diner)Schubert Impromptu in A-flat major (the "slow" one, from the second set)
Chopin Etude in F minor, Op. 25 #2
Scriabin Etude in B-flat minor, Op. 8 #11
Beethoven Sonata in F-sharp major, Op. 78
Scriabin Sonata #10
---------------
Chopin Polonaise in F-sharp minor
Schubert "little" A major Sonata (D. 664)

Coincidentally, I'll be performing the Debussy cello sonata and L'Isle joyeuse at The Westchester complex in DC on Monday evening (see below). Second half will be the Debussy string quartet. Cool thing is, we get PAID! DC Metropolitan Area residents, please note that your attendance will provide a meal for my starving children.

Mark, is your program content and sequence set in stone? If not, I have no comment and will await updates. If so, well I'll just stand by to hear your answer.

Either way, I am looking forward to hearing your Op. 25 No. 2. I had a student in NYC who actually got what I was trying to teach him about the rhythmic intricacies of that piece and how Chopin's indications should be interpreted literally. He got it, but was never able to actually execute it. So I'll be following the live feed with bated breath as you perform this exquisite, complex masterpiece.



“Four on Five” presents an all-Debussy Program

The Westchester
4000 Cathedral Avenue, N.W.
Southwest Corner of Cathedral Avenue and 39th Street
Monday, May 6, 2019 -- Main Lobby, 7:30 p.m.

CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918)
~ Sonata for cello and piano (1915)
~ L’Isle Joyeuse (The Joyful Island) for solo piano (1904)
~ String Quartet, Op. 10 in G minor (1893)

Robyn Tessin and Carolyn Esko Carlson, violins;
Julia Moline, viola; Valerie Matthews, cello;
Simon Finlow, piano
Originally Posted by SiFi
....is your program content and sequence set in stone?

Pretty much (geared by my round-to round in the competition), but I'd still be interested to hear your impressions. (You won't be messing me up.) grin

BTW, the one time I made the semi-finals at the Cliburn, I had gotten all kinds of expert feedback telling me that my 1st round program was a terrible idea. I listened with interest. ha
Marc-André Hamelin is playing at the NCH in Dublin next Thursday (May 9th). For me the highlight will be the Schumann Fantasie, Chopin Polonaise-Fantaisie, and Scherzo no.4. I'm glad he now plays music that I like. grin

I like the cheap unreserved tickets in the choir balcony for solo piano recitals, as I can find the perfect position after I arrive. It's only €27.50.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Marc-André Hamelin is playing at the NCH in Dublin next Thursday (May 9th). For me the highlight will be the Schumann Fantasie, Chopin Polonaise-Fantaisie, and Scherzo no.4. I'm glad he now plays music that I like. grin

I like the cheap unreserved tickets in the choir balcony for solo piano recitals, as I can find the perfect position after I arrive. It's only €27.50.


You'll have to report back. I love Hamelin's work, but his Chopin can fall flat for me.
Jean Rondeaux will be at The Wigmore on 10 June 2019. I may attend.
Self-promotion alert!!

Some of the best string players in the DC metro area will be performing with me as a grateful accessory on Monday May 6 at 7:30 at The Westchester complex, 4000 Cathedral Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016. We'll be doing a selection of Debussy's greatest masterpieces.

Here's the official blurb:

“Four on Five” presents an all-Debussy Program
Monday, May 6, 2019
Main Lobby, 7:30 p.m.

CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862-1918)
~ Sonata for cello and piano (1915)
~ L’Isle Joyeuse (The Joyful Island) for solo piano (1904)
~ String Quartet, Op. 10 in G minor (1893)
Robyn Tessin and Carolyn Esko Carlson, violins;
Julia Moline, viola; Valerie Matthews, cello;
Simon Finlow, piano

To lead our thoughts to Paris in the spring, the string quartet “Four on Five” and pianist Simon Finlow look forward to presenting this all-Debussy program. The program draws from all phases of Claude Debussy’s compositional life: from his youthful String Quartet, to his colorful “L’Isle Joyeuse” (The Joyful Island) for solo piano, to his autumnal Sonata for cello and piano.

The performers appear regularly with the Friday Morning Music Club. In addition, violinists Robyn Tessin and Carolyn Esko Carlson and violist Julia Moline are members of the Avanti Orchestra, cellist Valerie Matthews has appeared on previous Westchester programs with the Leland Ensemble, and pianist Simon Finlow is a frequent participant in piano competitions and master classes.
Marc-Andre Hamelin (July 12 and 14) and George Li (June 29) will be performing at the Bellingham Festival of Music for those within reach of western Washington state.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Nobuyuki Tsujii at Carnegie Hall on Friday May 10th......

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 2

Please do me a favor: Let us know how the heck he does that leap in the last measure! grin

(I don't just mean how well he does it: I mean how he seems to go about it at all.)

There are leaps all over that piece, as well as the others, but that's the one I really would wonder about.)



So the concert was fantastic. His delicacy and tonal control are simply amazing.

I paid special attention to how he approached leaps. You know how all of our teachers tell us to move our hand into position early, to the extent possible, to make sure it's in place and give ourselves a tiny bit of time to play the note without harshness? He's better at that than anyone else. He also does it constantly, even in movements that most of us wouldn't categorize as 'leaps' but still involve moving the entire hand. It's so impressive to watch, at times it seems like you're watching a video with slightly out of sync audio, where the movement occurs ever so slightly before the sound. I think he also leaves the note before a leap earlier than most would, at least in some cases, to give him that tiny bit more time to find the landing spot. He's creative with the pedal to get away with this.

And by the way, he often needs that time for correction. Many times I saw him leap a little too far and do a sub-second correction and find the right note. Again, it's safe to say he's better at this that the rest of us. It's really amazing to watch. It's also inspired me to do a better job on this.

You can what I'm talking about on some of the youtube videos of him playing,
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by jon-nyc
Nobuyuki Tsujii at Carnegie Hall on Friday May 10th......

CHOPIN Scherzo No. 2

Please do me a favor: Let us know how the heck he does that leap in the last measure! grin

(I don't just mean how well he does it: I mean how he seems to go about it at all.)

There are leaps all over that piece, as well as the others, but that's the one I really would wonder about.)



So the concert was fantastic. His delicacy and tonal control are simply amazing.

I paid special attention to how he approached leaps. You know how all of our teachers tell us to move our hand into position early, to the extent possible, to make sure it's in place and give ourselves a tiny bit of time to play the note without harshness? He's better at that than anyone else. He also does it constantly, even in movements that most of us wouldn't categorize as 'leaps' but still involve moving the entire hand. It's so impressive to watch, at times it seems like you're watching a video with slightly out of sync audio, where the movement occurs ever so slightly before the sound. I think he also leaves the note before a leap earlier than most would, at least in some cases, to give him that tiny bit more time to find the landing spot. He's creative with the pedal to get away with this.

And by the way, he often needs that time for correction. Many times I saw him leap a little too far and do a sub-second correction and find the right note. Again, it's safe to say he's better at this that the rest of us. It's really amazing to watch. It's also inspired me to do a better job on this.

You can what I'm talking about on some of the youtube videos of him playing,


Thanks for the recap.
Tonight, May 11th, Angela Hewitt plays the Toccatas at the 92nd St Y in New York City and returns on May 14th to play the English Suites 1-3.
Apparently, Martha Argerich's concerts in Singapore in early June have been cancelled (in one of them, Eric Lu will play instead) because of "health reasons". Don't know if anyone here was going to go.

I just hope she'll get well soon, I'm not quite ready to lose Martha Argerich just yet.
Krystian Zimerman plays a recital in Stuttgart on Tuesday June 4th, and in Basel on June 15th (Brahms 3rd sonata, Chopin 4 Scherzi). I will try to make it to one of those!

I got to see Yuja Wang in Zurich last Sunday, where she played Schumann concerto with the Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Was anyone at any of the concerts of her European tour? She had also had to cancel the first half of them because of illness.
This was an interesting concert. I can't describe what it was like to hear her play- she has always been a pianist I really admired, someone whom I felt never compromised on quality even while she sustained a glamorous image, but seeing her in action was something else. I had never heard the opening theme of that Schumann played with such tenderness. I was constantly astounded by her courage in playing with such incredible intimacy, and I was a little disappointed that the orchestra often failed to respond. In the second movement, for example, that beautiful conversation between solo and tutti, she was constantly inviting the orchestra to play softer, but they constantly answered her louder. On the whole there was a strange rapport between the two. It might have simply been lack of rehearsal time together, especially that she jumped in halfway through their tour, but I felt a certain coldness, a lack of agreement or a desire to come to an agreement and to make music together. (Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla is one of the most successful female conductors today, but in general I was not convinced or moved by much of what she and the orchestra did. Brahms's 2nd symphony, which was the second half of the program and which I was so excited to hear, was disappointing). In the first movement of Schumann, they took the recapitulation way too slowly and I thought, my god, how is Yuja going to handle this tempo? She simply didn't- she took her own, which was very noticeably faster. I was also surprised that she and the conductor did not come back on stage together after the applause, even after she had played her third encore. (She played three: Mozart/ Volodos/ Wang Rondo alla Turka, Schubert/ Liszt Gretchen am Spinnrade, and Horowitz/ Bizet Carmen variations).

I don't know how other people feel about this, but to me there is something forced and slightly circus-like about the whole tradition of virtuosic encores. After such an intensly poetic piece, I preferred to stay in that mood and not hear anything else. The idea of more- more blindingly fast, gazillion-note pieces that would invite Oh and Wow's had something a little degrading about it, both to the artist, to the audience, and to the masterpiece that had just been delivered. Yuja played magnificently, but I wonder if she enjoys it or if she thinks this is what people want to hear (is this what people want to hear? Isn't this injustice to the audience as well?). I think of pianists like Vadym Kholodenko, who, when people expect a Lizst opera paraphrase, he gives them a Bach choral prelude- when they ask (or think they should ask) for virtuosity, he gives them prayer. It is as if he is saying, I am here to tell you something more important. To me that is more honest. I can't and do not want to hear Flight of the Bumble Bee after Prokofiev 2, or Carmen Fantasy after the painful spiritual journey of a late Beethoven sonata. I want to leave with that, to hold on to the experience as long as possible.

Sorry for the long post.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Apparently, Martha Argerich's concerts in Singapore in early June have been cancelled (in one of them, Eric Lu will play instead) because of "health reasons". Don't know if anyone here was going to go.

I just hope she'll get well soon, I'm not quite ready to lose Martha Argerich just yet.

She's still billed to appear in the BBC Proms in August, playing Tchaik 1 (all seat tickets sold out of course, but you can still turn up and prom for £6):

https://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/events/performers/3bb8b89e-5700-4d7a-aa0b-d48f8706831d

If anyone can persuade her to turn up, it's her pal Daniel wink who's conducting. And she adores the Proms audiences too thumb.
Originally Posted by bennevis
If anyone can persuade her to turn up, it's her pal Daniel wink who's conducting. And she adores the Proms audiences too thumb.

I had been under the impression she had outgrew the phase where she was avoiding concerts and recitals, even through the stratagem of self-harm. Is she still avoiding her scheduled performances then, even now?
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
If anyone can persuade her to turn up, it's her pal Daniel wink who's conducting. And she adores the Proms audiences too thumb.

I had been under the impression she had outgrew the phase where she was avoiding concerts and recitals, even through the stratagem of self-harm. Is she still avoiding her scheduled performances then, even now?
Maybe she's just really ill? I see no reason to assume she's just avoiding the concert for another reason. Why call cutting her finger "self harm". To me that sounds like you're trying to sensationalize things. When people use that phrase it usually refers to something more serious.


Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
If anyone can persuade her to turn up, it's her pal Daniel wink who's conducting. And she adores the Proms audiences too thumb.

I had been under the impression she had outgrew the phase where she was avoiding concerts and recitals, even through the stratagem of self-harm. Is she still avoiding her scheduled performances then, even now?
Maybe she's just really ill? I see no reason to assume she's just avoiding the concert for another reason. Why call cutting her finger "self harm". To me that sounds like you're trying to sensationalize things. When people use that phrase it usually refers to something more serious.


Plus in itself it trivialises the serious issue of severe performance anxiety. My guess here is that she is genuinely ill. I can’t imagine being under so much pressure to perform well while being ill.
It did sound to me like she was actually ill. Let's not forget that she's, what, 77? I just hope it's nothing serious.

bennevis, I hope you're right and she'll be back for the August Proms.
Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Plus in itself it trivialises the serious issue of severe performance anxiety. My guess here is that she is genuinely ill. I can’t imagine being under so much pressure to perform well while being ill.

Sorry, I seriously misspoke. eek I didn't mean to trivialize real self-harm. I see that cutting one's finger to try to give evidence for why one shouldn't have to give a performance is on a different order of magnitude from those that cut out of anxiety and depression. Sorry to all to have been so flippant in my inappropriate use of terminology. blush blush

I was wondering though if she was just trying to avoid performances still. It seems the consensus is that this is behind her and now if she misses an performance, it is because she is really ill.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Plus in itself it trivialises the serious issue of severe performance anxiety. My guess here is that she is genuinely ill. I can’t imagine being under so much pressure to perform well while being ill.

Sorry, I seriously misspoke. eek I didn't mean to trivialize real self-harm. I see that cutting one's finger to try to give evidence for why one shouldn't have to give a performance is on a different order of magnitude from those that cut out of anxiety and depression. Sorry to all to have been so flippant in my inappropriate use of terminology. blush blush

I was wondering though if she was just trying to avoid performances still. It seems the consensus is that this is behind her and now if she misses an performance, it is because she is really ill.


Don’t worry! Although I believe she did cut herself out of severe acute anxiety, that’s what I was saying.
She still cancels some performances. It took me three attempts to finally get to see her. When I saw her in March, she looked very frail walking on stage, but that didn't last long... I have been a huge fan for decades, but I didn't realise how amazing she was.

I don't know if this is true or not, but I read that in recent years she only schedules concerts that won't bother her for weeks beforehand, but she does have to cancel from time to time for health reasons. She has had to do this frequently in the last thirty years.

I hope she gets well soon, but I wouldn't be too worried.
BTW Sybille, Yuja Wang is playing in Dublin on September 4th with the Staatskapelle Dresden. Rachmaninov 3.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
BTW Sybille, Yuja Wang is playing in Dublin on September 4th with the Staatskapelle Dresden. Rachmaninov 3.

What!! Three days before I leave for Vienna. Oh gods, this is too tempting. Will you go? Are there tickets yet?
Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Although I believe she did cut herself out of severe acute anxiety, that’s what I was saying.

I did read that she suffered from severe depression around the time of her first marriage and baby and that it lasted 2 years. Not sure, but her losing custody of the baby might also have had something to do with her depression, or maybe it was that she lost custody because of her depression. For an A-list star of the classical world, she's had difficulties in her life.
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by johnstaf
BTW Sybille, Yuja Wang is playing in Dublin on September 4th with the Staatskapelle Dresden. Rachmaninov 3.

What!! Three days before I leave for Vienna. Oh gods, this is too tempting. Will you go? Are there tickets yet?


Yep! They went on sale today! I have already booked. I can't wait! I'd love to hear her Prokofiev 2, but you can't have everything...
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Although I believe she did cut herself out of severe acute anxiety, that’s what I was saying.

I did read that she suffered from severe depression around the time of her first marriage and baby and that it lasted 2 years. Not sure, but her losing custody of the baby might also have had something to do with her depression, or maybe it was that she lost custody because of her depression. For an A-list star of the classical world, she's had difficulties in her life.


Yes, she's certainly had her troubles. Early on, she even stopped playing. She wondered why people were making such a big deal about someone playing the piano.

I remember seeing an interview with her on the news a few years ago. She was upset that there had been a bomb in Kabul that day, and she felt a bit silly talking about her piano playing as if it was really important.

BTW, a friend of mine got to hang out with her back stage a few years ago and said she was lovely.
Originally Posted by Rania
I can't describe what it was like to hear her play- she has always been a pianist I really admired, someone whom I felt never compromised on quality even while she sustained a glamorous image, but seeing her in action was something else. I had never heard the opening theme of that Schumann played with such tenderness.
......
I don't know how other people feel about this, but to me there is something forced and slightly circus-like about the whole tradition of virtuosic encores.


I think Yuja Wang is one of the greatest pianists in the world today. Some people only hear flash, but I feel the same was as you do. I think she has a rare quality about her.

Agreed about the flashy encores. Sometimes a bombastic encore can spoil the mood.

I remember attending a recital in which Andras Schiff played the Diabelli Variations. For me the atmosphere was magical. For an encore he played the Goldberg aria. It was so perfectly judged.

Originally Posted by johnstaf
Yep! They went on sale today! I have already booked. I can't wait! I'd love to hear her Prokofiev 2, but you can't have everything...

Right, that's it, I'm going, too laugh
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Originally Posted by Rania
I don't know how other people feel about this, but to me there is something forced and slightly circus-like about the whole tradition of virtuosic encores.

Agreed about the flashy encores. Sometimes a bombastic encore can spoil the mood.

Yuja is hardly the only pianist that plays virtuosic encores. Valentina Lisitsa loves to play La Campanella as an encore and she does often. It's like her signature encore. There are at least 8-9 different recordings on Youtube of her playing this piece - almost half are encores.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

Yuja is hardly the only pianist that plays virtuosic encores. Valentina Lisitsa loves to play La Campanella as an encore and she does often. It's like her signature encore. There are at least 8-9 different recordings on Youtube of her playing this piece - almost half are encores.


Indeed. It's a time-honoured tradition, but sometimes it can spoil the mood. Sometimes it can be wonderful. I remember Luganski following a Rachmaninoff sonata with the R's arrangement of Mendelssohn's Midsummer Night's Dream Overture. Needless to say it worked like a charm.

I can imagine hearing Valentina playing La Campanella live would be great. Somehow she always manages to inject a sense of fun into the proceedings. She has an infectious love of the music she plays. I've never actually heard her in concert, but I'd love to.
Martha went through a prolonged battle with cancer in the 90's, to the point where it metastisized in her lungs and lymph nodes. She barely and I mean *barely* scraped through. I got to know her shortly after she came through that, and it took such an immense toll on her. The aggressiveness of the treatments really messed her up and she has been struggling with her health ever since - she is such a trooper. if I were her, I would have stopped playing in public after that - that she gives any concerts at all is a testament to her inner strength! She is a wonderful woman and such a gifted pianist.
Originally Posted by Amy C
Martha went through a prolonged battle with cancer in the 90's, to the point where it metastisized in her lungs and lymph nodes. She barely and I mean *barely* scraped through. I got to know her shortly after she came through that, and it took such an immense toll on her. The aggressiveness of the treatments really messed her up and she has been struggling with her health ever since - she is such a trooper. if I were her, I would have stopped playing in public after that - that she gives any concerts at all is a testament to her inner strength! She is a wonderful woman and such a gifted pianist.


Thanks for that Amy. I remember hearing her say how fortunate she was that they were able to leave the muscles in her back intact after part of her lung was removed, as she wouldn't be able to play the same way otherwise.

With her health struggles, touring must be especially demanding. Travel can be hard on the youngest and fittest of us.

Even though she has shunned the limelight, she has been very open about her health, and the various struggles in her life. I admire her for that.

I've always wanted to meet her more than anyone else. Maybe I'll bump into her on the street some day. I'd love to thank her for being a wonderful part of my life.

What an extraordinary woman. I remember buying my first Martha CD decades ago. It was Prokofiev 3. Hearing her play it at 77 could have been a bit nostalgic, but it wasn't because what I heard was a great artist in her prime. I've never heard playing like it.
Originally Posted by Amy C
Martha went through a prolonged battle with cancer in the 90's, to the point where it metastisized in her lungs and lymph nodes. She barely and I mean *barely* scraped through. I got to know her shortly after she came through that, and it took such an immense toll on her. The aggressiveness of the treatments really messed her up and she has been struggling with her health ever since - she is such a trooper. if I were her, I would have stopped playing in public after that - that she gives any concerts at all is a testament to her inner strength! She is a wonderful woman and such a gifted pianist.


My word! I didn’t have a clue about that. I’ve always admired her as a pianist but wow!
Originally Posted by Amy C
Martha went through a prolonged battle with cancer in the 90's, to the point where it metastisized in her lungs and lymph nodes. She barely and I mean *barely* scraped through. I got to know her shortly after she came through that, and it took such an immense toll on her. The aggressiveness of the treatments really messed her up and she has been struggling with her health ever since - she is such a trooper. if I were her, I would have stopped playing in public after that - that she gives any concerts at all is a testament to her inner strength! She is a wonderful woman and such a gifted pianist.

What an amazing and inspirational story!
Hmmmmmm...

https://konzerthaus.at/konzert/eventid/56800
Originally Posted by Sibylle


That would be an interesting concert to attend.
Originally Posted by Sibylle

Well I'd go to hear her any time, but Vienna is a little far. grin

I love that Mozart F major concerto.
(The D minor isn't too bad either.) ha
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Well I'd go to hear her any time, but Vienna is a little far. grin

I love that Mozart F major concerto.
(The D minor isn't too bad either.) ha

Haha, yes!

The thing is, I'll be in Vienna anyway at that time, doing a course grin So, naturally I bought a ticket!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Well I'd go to hear her any time, but Vienna is a little far. grin

I love that Mozart F major concerto.
(The D minor isn't too bad either.) ha

Haha, yes!

The thing is, I'll be in Vienna anyway at that time, doing a course grin So, naturally I bought a ticket!



Lucky you! Be sure to give us your recap of the concert.
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Lucky you! Be sure to give us your recap of the concert.

Will do!

I may or may not be overdoing it with recitals and concerts for the rest of this year. But I have 15 years to catch up with and have been working my backside off to make some extra cash, so I figured I might as well grin

So here's what's booked:

August 27th: Ivo Pogorelich at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg
September 4th: Yuja Wang and Staatskapelle Dresden in Dublin
September 25th: Mitsuko Uchida and Mahler Chamber Orchestra in Vienna

Plus, I'm sorely tempted to fly to Zagreb (Croatia) in November to hear Kissin playing Beethoven sonatas! I *have* to hear that program, and his tour dates are really inconvenient for me this time - for example, he'll play it in the Vienna Musikverein a few weeks before I'm in Vienna again in late winter (Feb)!! November may just be doable.

I'd love to hear everyone else's plans!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Lucky you! Be sure to give us your recap of the concert.

Will do!

I may or may not be overdoing it with recitals and concerts for the rest of this year. But I have 15 years to catch up with and have been working my backside off to make some extra cash, so I figured I might as well grin

So here's what's booked:

August 27th: Ivo Pogorelich at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg
September 4th: Yuja Wang and Staatskapelle Dresden in Dublin
September 25th: Mitsuko Uchida and Mahler Chamber Orchestra in Vienna

Plus, I'm sorely tempted to fly to Zagreb (Croatia) in November to hear Kissin playing Beethoven sonatas! I *have* to hear that program, and his tour dates are really inconvenient for me this time - for example, he'll play it in the Vienna Musikverein a few weeks before I'm in Vienna again in late winter (Feb)!! November may just be doable.

I'd love to hear everyone else's plans!



Wow! Great bookings so far, and if you can add Kissin, wow, again!
Holy sh*t!

Heads up everyone who was planning to hear the Beethoven sonatas from Kissin this coming season - they’re selling out many months in advance.

I checked out several of the European recitals in November, December, January and February, and the only one that had a halfway decent seat left (balcony, but at least not in the back on the right or something like that) was London in early February.

It’s only a week before I’ll be off to Vienna again, but I can’t miss this. Haven’t heard my favourite sonata live in literally decades

Just letting ye know... get your tickets if you were planning to.
Originally Posted by Sibylle


So here's what's booked:

August 27th: Ivo Pogorelich at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg
September 4th: Yuja Wang and Staatskapelle Dresden in Dublin
September 25th: Mitsuko Uchida and Mahler Chamber Orchestra in Vienna

Plus, I'm sorely tempted to fly to Zagreb (Croatia) in November to hear Kissin playing Beethoven sonatas! I *have* to hear that program, and his tour dates are really inconvenient for me this time - for example, he'll play it in the Vienna Musikverein a few weeks before I'm in Vienna again in late winter (Feb)!! November may just be doable.

WOW! Amazing. What better excuse for such travel. You're gonna be in for a great end of summer season!
Yuja Wang piano, Feb 18th, 2020. Walt Disney Concert Hall. Valentine's date smile

https://www.laphil.com/events/performances/717/2020-02-18/yuja-wang
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
Yuja Wang piano, Feb 18th, 2020. Walt Disney Concert Hall. Valentine's date smile

https://www.laphil.com/events/performances/717/2020-02-18/yuja-wang


Would be enjoyable to attend. Alas...
Lang Lang at Carnegie Hall Thurs May 7 2020
Tickets on sale now
Orange County Philharmonic has a great lineup:
Daniil Trifonov February 9th at Soka Performing Arts in Orange County, CA, followed by
Yuja Wang February 20th at Segerstrom (after her recital at Walt Disney)
plus Midori and Jean Yves Thibaudet doing a complete cycle of Beethoven Violin Sonatas January 31-Feb. 1st at Segerstrom.

Daniil playing all Bach. The Chaconne transcription by Brahms, the Rach transcription of the E major violin partita , the Lizst transcription of the organ Fantasia and Fugue in g minor, followed by the complete The Art of Fugue.
cmb13 and I are going to be attending this Stephen Hough performance on Saturday evening, April 18th @ 8:00PM at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC. If anyone else is going to be attending, let us know and we can all go chill in one of the members lounges:

Quote
National Symphony Orchestra: Langrée conducts Brahms's First / Hough plays Beethoven

National Symphony Orchestra
[quote]Louis Langrée, conductor *
Stephen Hough, piano
J. Wolfe: Fountain of Youth
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Brahms: Symphony No. 1

With its grand orchestration and stormy, romantic movements, Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto is a vital precursor to the composer’s “heroic” middle-period style, which the NSO explores later this season in Beethoven at 250. Stephen Hough effortlessly conquers the concerto, which demands remarkable mastery and range of color from the soloist. Brahms’s radiant First Symphony and Julia Wolfe’s Fountain of Youth complete the program, making a thrilling NSO debut for conductor Louis Langrée, Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.
Can’t wait!
Sounds amazing - enjoy! And I'm a tiny bit jealous that you get to meet up just like that. Silly ocean, always in the way.
Yeah, that's what I just said to Irina Lankova also! Wish you could come too, Sib!

Originally Posted by cmb13
Yeah, that's what I just said to Irina Lankova also! Wish you could come too, Sib!


Why? Have you and Irina Lankova progressed from mutual admiration to FFF (fast facebook friends) ?
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
cmb13 and I are going to be attending this Stephen Hough performance on Saturday evening, April 18th @ 8:00PM at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC. If anyone else is going to be attending, let us know and we can all go chill in one of the members lounges:

Quote
National Symphony Orchestra: Langrée conducts Brahms's First / Hough plays Beethoven

National Symphony Orchestra
[quote]Louis Langrée, conductor *
Stephen Hough, piano
J. Wolfe: Fountain of Youth
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Brahms: Symphony No. 1

With its grand orchestration and stormy, romantic movements, Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto is a vital precursor to the composer’s “heroic” middle-period style, which the NSO explores later this season in Beethoven at 250. Stephen Hough effortlessly conquers the concerto, which demands remarkable mastery and range of color from the soloist. Brahms’s radiant First Symphony and Julia Wolfe’s Fountain of Youth complete the program, making a thrilling NSO debut for conductor Louis Langrée, Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.



Lucky you 2!!
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
cmb13 and I are going to be attending this Stephen Hough performance on Saturday evening, April 18th @ 8:00PM at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC. If anyone else is going to be attending, let us know and we can all go chill in one of the members lounges:

Quote
National Symphony Orchestra: Langrée conducts Brahms's First / Hough plays Beethoven

National Symphony Orchestra
[quote]Louis Langrée, conductor *
Stephen Hough, piano
J. Wolfe: Fountain of Youth
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3
Brahms: Symphony No. 1

With its grand orchestration and stormy, romantic movements, Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto is a vital precursor to the composer’s “heroic” middle-period style, which the NSO explores later this season in Beethoven at 250. Stephen Hough effortlessly conquers the concerto, which demands remarkable mastery and range of color from the soloist. Brahms’s radiant First Symphony and Julia Wolfe’s Fountain of Youth complete the program, making a thrilling NSO debut for conductor Louis Langrée, Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.



Lucky you 2!!

And par for the course for people who live in D.C., it's the visitor from away who first finds out about this concert while the D.C. resident was clueless blush
No, we’re only friends in my imagination!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Holy sh*t!

Heads up everyone who was planning to hear the Beethoven sonatas from Kissin this coming season - they’re selling out many months in advance.

I checked out several of the European recitals in November, December, January and February, and the only one that had a halfway decent seat left (balcony, but at least not in the back on the right or something like that) was London in early February.

It’s only a week before I’ll be off to Vienna again, but I can’t miss this. Haven’t heard my favourite sonata live in literally decades

Just letting ye know... get your tickets if you were planning to.

Thankfully, I have my tickets for Kissin's Philadelphia recital in May. And good seats as well!
DC area residents: Beatrice Rana will be performing at the Terrace Theater in the Kennedy Center on May 12 at 7:30. Tickets available now! Thanks to fellow Beatrice fan ClsscLib for bringing this to my attention and purchasing tickets for us. Terrific program: Bach Italian Concerto, Schumann Sonata No. 3, Albeniz Iberia Book 3, and Stravinsky Petrouchka suite.

Details HERE
Originally Posted by Hank M
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Holy sh*t!

Heads up everyone who was planning to hear the Beethoven sonatas from Kissin this coming season - they’re selling out many months in advance.


Thankfully, I have my tickets for Kissin's Philadelphia recital in May. And good seats as well!

I'm thinking about getting tickets for his Chicago recital, also in May. Might be too late, though. It's just hard to plan that far in advance...
Originally Posted by Hank M
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Holy sh*t!

Heads up everyone who was planning to hear the Beethoven sonatas from Kissin this coming season - they’re selling out many months in advance.

I checked out several of the European recitals in November, December, January and February, and the only one that had a halfway decent seat left (balcony, but at least not in the back on the right or something like that) was London in early February.

It’s only a week before I’ll be off to Vienna again, but I can’t miss this. Haven’t heard my favourite sonata live in literally decades

Just letting ye know... get your tickets if you were planning to.

Thankfully, I have my tickets for Kissin's Philadelphia recital in May. And good seats as well!

Looking forward to comparing notes with you smile


Originally Posted by dumka1

I'm thinking about getting tickets for his Chicago recital, also in May. Might be too late, though. It's just hard to plan that far in advance...

Dooooo eeeeet! You won't possibly regret this. And the way it looks, even if something completely unavoidable comes up, you'll have no trouble reselling the ticket(s).
Not upcoming, but you can catch it in medici.tv Tsinandali Festival 2019
Originally Posted by newport
Not upcoming, but you can catch it in medici.tv Tsinandali Festival 2019


Sounds fun!
Is anyone from or in Budapest and has experience with the Bela Bartok hall? I am here for a couple of days and want to attend a concert tomorrow, "Three Works by Bartok" (Two Portraits, op. 5, 3rd piano concerto with Dezső Ránki, and Bluebeard's Castle). It is sold out, but I read that the hall includes a designated standing area. I wrote the hall and got no response- has anyone done standing tickets there? If yes, how early does one need to be there?
@Mark_C:

Off topic note:

Wanted to follow up to my previous posts so you would know that I do now own the AvantGrand N2 (best hybrid digital piano currently available) and also the Yamaha P-515 (just recently acquired and is the reason for the new member name) along with the older Yamaha Clavinova CLP-990 that dates from 2001 and received it from a New York, NY seller, here -- in this thread:

Yamaha Clavinova CLP-990M

The other Baldwin SF-10 grand piano purchased from Greg Kottmann (at Piano Pros in West Chester, OH) had to be sold after encountering issues with legs that had a stability problem (as the piano wobbled when played) and required replacement and there were old bass strings that were quite "tubby" sounding -- this turned out to be quite enough disappointment to sell the piano and move on.

All current digital(s) play and sound better than that Baldwin SF-10 grand piano!
Yammy
How many different threads do you need to post the same OT message about the pianos you now own? I’m sure Mark has seen your personal OT message by now or will soon since you have posted this three times.
I wish there was a thread for upcoming UNimportant concerts! In any event, if you live or work in DC and want to take a break from said life/work, I’ll be performing some Liszt in a lunchtime recital at Calvary Baptist Church in Chinatown this coming Friday, October 11, at noon. Program to include the mighty Vallee d’Obermann. Admission is free, but with a suggested (i.e. mandatory) donation. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.
Originally Posted by SiFi
I wish there was a thread for upcoming UNimportant concerts! In any event, if you live or work in DC and want to take a break from said life/work, I’ll be performing some Liszt in a lunchtime recital at Calvary Baptist Church in Chinatown this coming Friday, October 11, at noon. Program to include the mighty Vallee d’Obermann. Admission is free, but with a suggested (i.e. mandatory) donation. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.



I sure wish I could attend.
Originally Posted by SiFi
I wish there was a thread for upcoming UNimportant concerts!....

Well, since I'm the one who said the word, I can tell you that it includes your concerts. grin
Originally Posted by SiFi
I wish there was a thread for upcoming UNimportant concerts! In any event, if you live or work in DC and want to take a break from said life/work, I’ll be performing some Liszt in a lunchtime recital at Calvary Baptist Church in Chinatown this coming Friday, October 11, at noon. Program to include the mighty Vallee d’Obermann. Admission is free, but with a suggested (i.e. mandatory) donation. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

I think it may be time to catch up on your piano progress. I will likely come since it is 0.5 miles from me - a 10 mins walk.
Originally Posted by SiFi
I wish there was a thread for upcoming UNimportant concerts! In any event, if you live or work in DC and want to take a break from said life/work, I’ll be performing some Liszt in a lunchtime recital at Calvary Baptist Church in Chinatown this coming Friday, October 11, at noon. Program to include the mighty Vallee d’Obermann. Admission is free, but with a suggested (i.e. mandatory) donation. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.


You obvious didn’t get memo:
Performances by PW members are ALWAYS important 😊
Wish I could be there !
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

I think it may be time to catch up on your piano progress. I will likely come since it is 0.5 miles from me - a 10 mins walk.

Hey, it would be great if you can make it. They don't tend to have huge audiences for these events (unlike Strathmore Mansion, where I'll be playing the same program next year), so my wife and I are trying to get lots of friends to come. Also, it would be terrific to see you again. I am still amazed at the fantastic job you did recording the Brahms concert that we did at the Lyceum.
Originally Posted by dogperson

You obviously didn’t get memo:
Performances by PW members are ALWAYS important 😊

I assume that means we can post about all the stuff we do that's open to the public. So yeah, I didn't get that memo. So advance notice. I'll be doing the wonderful Shostakovich Quintet with a fabulous group of string players in two recitals next year. Details will be forthcoming.

Thanks for setting me straight dogperson.
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by dogperson

You obviously didn’t get memo:
Performances by PW members are ALWAYS important 😊

I assume that means we can post about all the stuff we do that's open to the public. So yeah, I didn't get that memo. So advance notice. I'll be doing the wonderful Shostakovich Quintet with a fabulous group of string players in two recitals next year. Details will be forthcoming.

Thanks for setting me straight dogperson.


You’re quite welcome. Many of us live too far to attend.... but you never know! Regardless, it’s great to hear about our members performances.
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

I think it may be time to catch up on your piano progress. I will likely come since it is 0.5 miles from me - a 10 mins walk.

Hey, it would be great if you can make it. They don't tend to have huge audiences for these events (unlike Strathmore Mansion, where I'll be playing the same program next year), so my wife and I are trying to get lots of friends to come. Also, it would be terrific to see you again. I am still amazed at the fantastic job you did recording the Brahms concert that we did at the Lyceum.

If I come tomorrow, shall I record your performance? I can bring my tripod. Don't mind at all.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

If I come tomorrow, shall I record your performance? I can bring my tripod. Don't mind at all.

So kind of you to offer. Yes, that would be great, on condition we can delete the recording if the performance goes terribly lol.
Originally Posted by SiFi
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

If I come tomorrow, shall I record your performance? I can bring my tripod. Don't mind at all.

So kind of you to offer. Yes, that would be great, on condition we can delete the recording if the performance goes terribly lol.


Good enough. You can give me a thumbs up or thumbs down wink
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Good enough. You can give me a thumbs up or thumbs down wink

Tyrone (lol), you are wonderful. Thanks for coming and recording. I'm not sure either performance deserves to be memorialized--possibly Valley of the vicious dog?--so I'll surely get back to you once I see the evidence. Cheers, mate.
Wish I could have been there!
Originally Posted by cmb13
Wish I could have been there!

You can, virtually! I posted a video clip from SiFi's recital over here.
Tyrone Slothrop, SiFi, and I will be attending a concert in Washington DC....

The Kennedy Center, Apr 18, 2020; Saturday 8 pm

Here are the official notes:
National Symphony Orchestra: Langrée conducts Brahms's First / Hough plays Beethoven
Saturday, April 18, 2020

National Symphony Orchestra
With its grand orchestration and stormy, romantic movements, Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto is a vital precursor to the composer’s “heroic” middle-period style, which the NSO explores later this season in Beethoven at 250. Stephen Hough effortlessly conquers the concerto, which demands remarkable mastery and range of color from the soloist. Brahms’s radiant First Symphony and Julia Wolfe’s Fountain of Youth complete the program, making a thrilling NSO debut for conductor Louis Langrée, Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

Julia Wolfe - Fountain of Youth
Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37
Johannes Brahms - Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68

If anyone else would like to join us, let us know!
Beatrice Rana in Seattle! October 24 and 26, she will play Schumann’s Piano Concerto Op. 54 in A minor with the Seattle Symphony.
Aren't there any more forum members in the DC area? Come on now, it'll be fun - a DC PW informal get-together! 🎼 🎼 🎼

Originally Posted by cmb13
Tyrone Slothrop, SiFi, and I will be attending a concert in Washington DC....

The Kennedy Center, Apr 18, 2020; Saturday 8 pm

Here are the official notes:
National Symphony Orchestra: Langrée conducts Brahms's First / Hough plays Beethoven
Saturday, April 18, 2020

National Symphony Orchestra
With its grand orchestration and stormy, romantic movements, Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto is a vital precursor to the composer’s “heroic” middle-period style, which the NSO explores later this season in Beethoven at 250. Stephen Hough effortlessly conquers the concerto, which demands remarkable mastery and range of color from the soloist. Brahms’s radiant First Symphony and Julia Wolfe’s Fountain of Youth complete the program, making a thrilling NSO debut for conductor Louis Langrée, Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

Julia Wolfe - Fountain of Youth
Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37
Johannes Brahms - Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68

If anyone else would like to join us, let us know!
I live in the DC area, but don't like going to the Kennedy center; I need more motivation than a Beethoven concerto to deal with that place, particularly for a nighttime concert (which of course most of them are).

There is a concert in the area that am going to on this coming Sunday featuring George Li, silver medalist from the 2015 Tchaikovsky: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/george-li-piano-tickets-53980656597?aff=ebdssbdestsearch It is actually at a respectable daytime hour. Program here: http://www.georgelipianist.com/concerts/
Originally Posted by scriabinfanatic
I live in the DC area, but don't like going to the Kennedy center; I need more motivation than a Beethoven concerto to deal with that place, particularly for a nighttime concert (which of course most of them are).

The motivation is meeting some fellow PW members. We'll have drinks at a top secret lounge in the KC (shhhhhh) and perhaps we can be all convinced to find some dinner before or after. smile
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by scriabinfanatic
I live in the DC area, but don't like going to the Kennedy center; I need more motivation than a Beethoven concerto to deal with that place, particularly for a nighttime concert (which of course most of them are).

The motivation is meeting some fellow PW members. We'll have drinks at a top secret lounge in the KC (shhhhhh) and perhaps we can be all convinced to find some dinner before or after. smile

Hoorah! Yes. Let's all get together in the lounge and meet one another. And if there's dinner, it's on me.
I’ll be sure to be there. DC or bust!
I was feeling jealous of Craig and Tyrone getting together for what looks to be a fantastic concert so I thought what might be on in Sydney when I am there. Wel, well, well.

A Russian Gala https://www.sydneysymphony.com/conc...r9-ir5QIVh7PtCh1YpgTqEAAYASAAEgLXRvD_BwE
Originally Posted by KevinM
I was feeling jealous of Craig and Tyrone getting together for what looks to be a fantastic concert so I thought what might be on in Sydney when I am there. Wel, well, well.

A Russian Gala https://www.sydneysymphony.com/conc...r9-ir5QIVh7PtCh1YpgTqEAAYASAAEgLXRvD_BwE

Sydney Opera House is a gorgeous venue too. A real wonder.

[Linked Image]

Enjoy! thumb
Oh, would love, love, love to join you in Sidney! If only it weren't half the world away! My partner (business partner) has a friend who lives on the bay, with a wide open view of the opera house. I saw pictures from a party he attended there....absolutely fantastic!
I just picked up tickets for two South Florida shows:

National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine Nov 19
Volodymyr Sirenko, Conductor
Olga Kern, Piano

Program to include:
+Maksym Berezovsky/Symphony in C Major (circa 1773)
+Rachmaninoff/Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18
+Tchaikovsky/Symphony No. 1 in G minor, Op. 13 (“Winter Daydreams”)

and

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Jan 19
Mark Wigglesworth, Conductor
Khatia Buniatishvili, Piano

Program to include:
+ Walton/Portsmouth Point Overture
+ Liszt/Piano Concerto No. 2 in A Major, S. 125
+ Rachmaninoff/Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27

Very Excited!
Nice!! And really lovely programs as well.

I'll not go to anything until Kissin in London on the 6th of Feb.
Originally Posted by cmb13
I just picked up tickets for two South Florida shows:

National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine Nov 19
Volodymyr Sirenko, Conductor
Olga Kern, Piano

Program to include:
+Maksym Berezovsky/Symphony in C Major (circa 1773)
+Rachmaninoff/Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18
+Tchaikovsky/Symphony No. 1 in G minor, Op. 13 (“Winter Daydreams”)

Bad timing for me! I'm going to South Florida on November 14 but returning up North on November 18. Oh well.

Enjoy this concert.
Yuja Wang will be playing the Rachmaninoff Fourth Piano Concerto with the Cleveland Orchestra and conductor Lorenzo Viotti at Severance Hall Thanksgiving Weekend. I'll be there for the Saturday evening performance.

http://www.clevelandorchestra.com/calendar/index.aspx
Holy smokes. Someone confiscate my credit card, please grin (nah, I've worked my backside off for the past months to be able to afford all this)

So I'll spend three months in Vienna next year, from mid Feb - mid May. And I just looked through all the programs and bought all the tickets (or, put the start of the ticket presale date into my calendar). So apart from hearing Kissin's Beethoven recital programme in London in February, I'll now go to:

- Renée Fleming and Evgeny Kissin, Musikverein
- Martha Argerich with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Konzerthaus

Martha Argerich being one of my lifelong pianistic idols, and the one I've somehow never managed to see live. I snatched up one of the last tickets and am actually a little weepy right now! I just hope she'll be there, after all her health has been a little shaky in recent years... oh please please please...

Not piano-related but still amazing:

- Sibelius / Tchaikovsky (with Alena Baeva!)
- "Leonore" at the Staatsoper
- "Der Rosenkavalier", also Staatsoper

And when I get home in mid May, I'll hear Pogorelich in Zagreb (or Šibenik, I haven't actually decided which).

I'd say I'm beginning to make up for the years of abstinence from classical music, wouldn't you? 3hearts
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Holy smokes. Someone confiscate my credit card, please grin (nah, I've worked my backside off for the past months to be able to afford all this)

So I'll spend three months in Vienna next year, from mid Feb - mid May. And I just looked through all the programs and bought all the tickets (or, put the start of the ticket presale date into my calendar). So apart from hearing Kissin's Beethoven recital programme in London in February, I'll now go to:

- Renée Fleming and Evgeny Kissin, Musikverein
- Martha Argerich with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Konzerthaus

Martha Argerich being one of my lifelong pianistic idols, and the one I've somehow never managed to see live. I snatched up one of the last tickets and am actually a little weepy right now! I just hope she'll be there, after all her health has been a little shaky in recent years... oh please please please...

Not piano-related but still amazing:

- Sibelius / Tchaikovsky (with Alena Baeva!)
- "Leonore" at the Staatsoper
- "Der Rosenkavalier", also Staatsoper

And when I get home in mid May, I'll hear Pogorelich in Zagreb (or Šibenik, I haven't actually decided which).

I'd say I'm beginning to make up for the years of abstinence from classical music, wouldn't you? 3hearts



Sounds fantastic and makes me jealous! Enjoy!
Just got back from the George Li Rach 3 concert with the fabulous NJSO. It's electrifying, just the kind you would expect from him (and more I think!)
Yes as I mentioned several posts back, I went to a solo recital featuring George Li a couple of months ago. His playing was just perfection.
I still feel a bit strange doing the self-promotion thing, but anyway, next week I will be performing in the DC FMMC Friday Concert Series; Calvary Baptist Church (Steinway D!!), in Chinatown. I'm playing two Jeux d'eau's lol. Details here: https://fmmc.org/event/friday-concert-series-3/

By the way, I have never heard a bad performance at any FMMC event so if you live in the DC Metropolitan Area and want to lose yourself in some beautiful music, please come. You won't regret it.
Back at the keys! Great! Wish I were nearby. Good luck.
Originally Posted by SiFi
I still feel a bit strange doing the self-promotion thing, but anyway, next week I will be performing in the DC FMMC Friday Concert Series; Calvary Baptist Church (Steinway D!!), in Chinatown. I'm playing two Jeux d'eau's lol. Details here: https://fmmc.org/event/friday-concert-series-3/

By the way, I have never heard a bad performance at any FMMC event so if you live in the DC Metropolitan Area and want to lose yourself in some beautiful music, please come. You won't regret it.

Wait. When did the Calvary Baptist Church get a Steinway D? They didn't have one for the last 2 recitals, did they?
Rob Mullins, a PW member is performing in LA on Jan 19th
Details here:
Rob Mullins Jan 19th LA
Kate Liu will be performing at a recital at Juilliard on January 17th if anyone is in the NYC/NJ metro area.

The concert starts at 8 pm.

https://www.juilliard.edu/event/142891/kate-liu-piano
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Wait. When did the Calvary Baptist Church get a Steinway D? They didn't have one for the last 2 recitals, did they?

Yep, it's a D, though not a very distinguished one. They've had it for several years.
Originally Posted by AssociateX
Kate Liu will be performing at a recital at Juilliard on January 17th if anyone is in the NYC/NJ metro area.

The concert starts at 8 pm.

https://www.juilliard.edu/event/142891/kate-liu-piano


I love Kate Liu. It's a pity the Atlantic is in the way.
Just got Ottmar Liebert tickets. Anyone listen to him? Classical guitar.

Broward Center, Amaturo Theater (Ft Lauderdale) this Fri Jan 17
Originally Posted by cmb13
Just got Ottmar Liebert tickets. Anyone listen to him? Classical guitar.

Broward Center, Amaturo Theater (Ft Lauderdale) this Fri Jan 17

Not yet, but I'm making a note smile

In other news, it's less than two weeks to Kissin in London and I'm beyond excited!
Originally Posted by Sibylle
Originally Posted by cmb13
Just got Ottmar Liebert tickets. Anyone listen to him? Classical guitar.

Broward Center, Amaturo Theater (Ft Lauderdale) this Fri Jan 17

Not yet, but I'm making a note smile

In other news, it's less than two weeks to Kissin in London and I'm beyond excited!

Eh....it wasn't that great.
I am excited for Seong-Jin Cho & Cuarteto Dalia in Madrid (CNDM). Martes, 4 de Febrero de 2020

http://www.auditorionacional.mcu.es/es/programacion/cndm-seong-jin-cho-cuarteto-dalia

Programa
Alban Berg (1885-1935)
Sonata para piano en si menor, op.1 (1908)
Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
Cuarteto de cuerda (1964)
Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)
Concierto para piano nº 1 en mi menor, op. 11 (1830)
(versión para quinteto de piano)
A rare chance to hear Barry Douglas in an intimate setting at Xavier University on Feb 12.

[Linked Image]
Long-time PW forum member Robin Meloy Goldsby (Piano Girl RMG) is coming to the States and having a Washington DC-area concert at PianoCraft in Gaithersburg Maryland on 22 February 2019. The announcement and info on reservations is over here.
Midori and Jean Yves Thibaudet this weekend in Orange County, CA. Segerstrom Concert Hall. Performing 3 Beethoven Violin/Piano sonatas, including the "Kreuzter" as part of the Beethoven 250 year celebration.

I received two free tickets as part of the KUSC giveaway!
Another personal promotion:

I'll be performing the fabulous Shostakovich Piano Quintet Op. 57 with some of the best string players in the DC metropolitan area, Carrie Esko Carlson, Julia Moline, Robyn Tessin, and Valerie Matthews. The recital is part of the FMMC Concert Series at Jordan Kitt's Music of Rockville Maryland.

Date: February 8, 2020
Time: 3:00 PM
Location: 11726 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD 20852

Anyone who lives in this neck of the woods, please join us if you can, and feel free to bring friends, family, friends of friends, family of friends, friends of family, and anyone else who might be interested in hearing some fascinating live music!

Here's a sample from the Quintet to whet your appetites:

Danil Trifonov in SoCal tomorrow afternoon at Soka University, Aliso Viejo, CA. All Bach, I believe, including complete The Art of Fugue.
Yuja at Disney Concert Hall tomorrow 2/18. Playing a selection of Chopin mazurkas interspersed with Brahms intermezzi, Berg sonata, "Une Barque" from Miroirs, Mompou and a Scriabin sonata.
Program repeats on 20th at Segerstrom Concert Hall in Orange County.
Originally Posted by BeeZee4
Yuja at Disney Concert Hall tomorrow 2/18. Playing a selection of Chopin mazurkas interspersed with Brahms intermezzi, Berg sonata, "Une Barque" from Miroirs, Mompou and a Scriabin sonata.
Program repeats on 20th at Segerstrom Concert Hall in Orange County.


I was there last night, incredible show. She didn't follow the program directly. She made an announcement prior to the show that should would mix it up and let the music guide her, something like that. She dressed beautifully, but I much preferred the first dress. Long, elegant, beautiful. The performance was wonderful.

She came back out 4 times at the end for encore performances, and these were the best, very virtuosic. I don't understand why people kept leaving, they thought she was done! Nothing is done until they turn up the lights.

[Linked Image]
It must be wonderful for Ms. Wang having so much music concert ready that she can let the music guide her. She's great. I've seen her in concert, but not a recital. I'd love that.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
It must be wonderful for Ms. Wang having so much music concert ready that she can let the music guide her. She's great. I've seen her in concert, but not a recital. I'd love that.


Thankfully someone on FB posted the pieces she played and the encore performances. Here are 3 of them.

Gluck Sgambati Melody
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xce1Hl9Oprk

Prokofiev Toccata in D minor Op 11
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNtTvtMgKQI

Schubert/Liszt : Gretchen am Spinnrade (HD)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozCirLYxSBI
Wonderful Yuja Wang!
Went to the Orange County recital last night at Segerstrom. An exhilarating experience! As noted, Wang did not follow the printed program, but let her feelings dictate what she should play at the moment.
Yuja entered the stage in her usual fashionista style, rocking a tight sequined white cocktail dress and high heels.
She began with the Galuppi, a nice warm up, then launched into "Une Barque". Her pianism and total control of the keyboard are never in doubt. The tonal colors and aural sounds she generated were wonderful, probably the highlight of the program for me. That was followed by the Mompou, also from the Impressionist school, then the Berg. She then jumped centuries and finished the 1st half of the program with the Bach Toccata.
The audience ate it all up, giving ovations after each piece. That proved to be a detriment in the 2nd half, in my opinion.
After changing into a lemon citrine colored gown, she began with a thunderous splashy Scriabin (Sonata #5). After which she spent time at the keyboard in thought, deciding which piece she felt like playing, then intermixing the Chopin Mazurkas and Brahms Intermezzi. She was trying to set a mood, but the audience would clap after each short piece, not wanting to withhold their appreciation. I felt that was getting on her nerves. She finished with the dramatic Scriabin No. 4, a piece described as one long climax.
After repeated bows, no encores.
My first time hearing Yuja live in solo recital, well worth attending. Afterwards, no autographs. Some piano students were waiting outside the artists entrance, hoping for a meet, but she had quickly left the premises. Her rock star status is cemented among these young musicians. Some waited over 2 hours at Disney the night before, hoping for a meet and greet, but again, no dice. eek
Originally Posted by BeeZee4

My first time hearing Yuja live in solo recital, well worth attending. Afterwards, no autographs. Some piano students were waiting outside the artists entrance, hoping for a meet, but she had quickly left the premises. Her rock star status is cemented among these young musicians. Some waited over 2 hours at Disney the night before, hoping for a meet and greet, but again, no dice. eek


Perhaps she runs straight off stage into a taxi.
Coming to Seattle 2020—
March 4, Helene Grimaud, Meany Hall (Chopin, Debussy, Silvestrov, Satie, Schumann)
March 8, Conrad Tao, Benaroya Hall
April 3, Steven Osborne (last 3 Beethoven sonatas), Benaroya Hall
May 21: “Rach Festival,” Benaroya (Rachmaninov’s 1st and 2d), Dominic Cheli, Aimi Kobayashi
May 23, “Rach Festival,” Benaroya (Rach 3d and 4th), Albert Cano Smith, Rémi Geniet
September 19, Khatia Buniatishvili, Benaroya, Seattle Symphony opening night
And in 2021—
February 14, Khatia Buniatishvili recital, Benaroya
April 6, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Benaroya (Debussy Préludes)
I have Yuja tomorrow night at Davies in SF - she is playing a LOT of stuff...
You will have a better chance meeting Yuja right after she release a new CD and she will sign the CD after concerts
This was interesting... Yuja wasn't happy with Orange county?

https://voiceofoc.org/2020/02/yuja-...ament-for-a-puzzled-segerstrom-audience/
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
This was interesting... Yuja wasn't happy with Orange county?

https://voiceofoc.org/2020/02/yuja-...ament-for-a-puzzled-segerstrom-audience/

Thanks for posting it.
It's a superbly done review -- really lets us know how it was -- and it was pretty unusual.
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
This was interesting... Yuja wasn't happy with Orange county?

https://voiceofoc.org/2020/02/yuja-...ament-for-a-puzzled-segerstrom-audience/

Thanks for posting it.
It's a superbly done review -- really lets us know how it was -- and it was pretty unusual.


The comments on coughing made me laugh. I thought there was a lot of coughing at the LA concert.

I am not sure how one confused a mazurka with Bach 😁
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
This was interesting... Yuja wasn't happy with Orange county?

https://voiceofoc.org/2020/02/yuja-...ament-for-a-puzzled-segerstrom-audience/

Thanks for posting it.
It's a superbly done review -- really lets us know how it was -- and it was pretty unusual.


The comments on coughing made me laugh. I thought there was a lot of coughing at the LA concert.

Perhaps Yuja is just channeling András Schiff in the narcissism department?
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
This was interesting... Yuja wasn't happy with Orange county?

https://voiceofoc.org/2020/02/yuja-...ament-for-a-puzzled-segerstrom-audience/
Thanks for posting it.
It's a superbly done review -- really lets us know how it was -- and it was pretty unusual.
The comments on coughing made me laugh. I thought there was a lot of coughing at the LA concert.
Perhaps Yuja is just channeling András Schiff in the narcissism department?

It seems there is more to it: Fury as Yuja, In Dark Glasses, Blanks Her Audience.
Angela Hewitt is performing the last two concerts of her Bach Series at the 92nd St Y in New York are coming up on March 30th and April 2nd. I will be there.

https://www.92y.org/event/angela-hewitt-bach-odyssey-xi

https://www.92y.org/event/angela-hewitt-bach-odyssey-xii

I have been privileged to have seen most of the concerts in her Bach series. Her performance of the Goldberg Variations was a transcendent moment for me. The whole audience was stunned into silence at the end of the piece.
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
Originally Posted by Mark_C
Thanks for posting it.
It's a superbly done review -- really lets us know how it was -- and it was pretty unusual.
The comments on coughing made me laugh. I thought there was a lot of coughing at the LA concert.
Perhaps Yuja is just channeling András Schiff in the narcissism department?
It seems there is more to it: Fury as Yuja, In Dark Glasses, Blanks Her Audience.

Yuja already has rebutted some of the claims in the last article.
Whatever happened in Vancouver Airport, it must have been dreadful.

She wore sunglasses because she had been crying all day, so she must have been badly shaken up. I'm so sorry she had such a horrible experience.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Whatever happened in Vancouver Airport, it must have been dreadful.

She wore sunglasses because she had been crying all day, so she must have been badly shaken up. I'm so sorry she had such a horrible experience.


Unfathomable that this had to happen to such a wonderful artist, who nothing more wants to share her gifts of music to her audience. Hope she does not have to endure such an experience again. And she has no political bias, at least not publicly, unlike other artists such as Igor Levit or Krystian Zimerman, who famously will no longer perform in the U.S. Why she was questioned at length is anyone's guess. Did they think she was carrying the coronavirus just because she's Asian?

Her recital in Orange County was wonderful, marred only by an audience who applauded when she was attempting to set a musical mood with her selection of Chopin and Brahms pieces. Yes, there was coughing, but not as much as Disney Hall.
I am sure the Canadian border authority did not take this step randomly, lightly, or in ill will. She is a world traveler after all, and they need to know precisely where she has been to recently and where she'd come from, as is called for in the procedure.
The latest public health advice in the UK is that anyone returning from Italy should go into self-imposed quarantine for two weeks, because of the sudden increase in cases there.

Pretty soon, every country (except possibly Antarctica) will be affected.........
Instead of just walking onstage in sunglasses I think she should have explained why she did so to the audience.
I'm praying and sacrificing small animals to the gods (well, maybe not the latter) that she won't cancel, because I have a ticket for next Monday to hopefully, finally see and hear live my lifelong idol Martha Argerich:

https://www.konzerthaus.at/konzert/eventid/57077

Send some good mojo my way if you have any to spare, will ye?
She didn't (cancel, I mean)! I sat there hyperventilating and pinching myself, but it was really, truly Martha, which became even more obvious once she started playing. Holy cannoli. She's still just as incredible as she's always been. I'm so glad I had the chance to hear her live!

Just like with Kissin's Beethoven recital last month, I'm tempted to ask: "How does one possibly follow this one up?" But then I remember I'll see Kissin with Renee Fleming next week, and all is well wink

What's everyone else been up to? Any amazing performances, recitals, concerts?
https://chopin2020.pl/en/competitors

Taiwan government is protesting the "China Taiwan" designation this year for the 9 participants from Taiwan
Yuju has cancelled her remaining tour dates in Europe.

Quote
I am sad to share with you that I need to cancel my remaining solo tour dates in Europe. Unfortunately, due to the current climate of uncertainty, and related logistical challenges, it is not possible for me to continue the tour – indeed six of my concerts have already been cancelled by venues who are having to respond to various governmental guidelines. This new recital program is very close to my heart, and I will work on finding opportunities to share it with my fans in Europe sometime in the future. I’m sending love and healing energy to everyone affected by the Coronavirus and other illnesses in Europe and across the globe, including in my home country of China. Take care of yourselves, and each other.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Instead of just walking onstage in sunglasses I think she should have explained why she did so to the audience.


I think that would have been a very bad idea. She was there to play music.

She should be free to wear sunglasses without having to explain herself.
Originally Posted by bSharp(C)yclist
Yuju has cancelled her remaining tour dates in Europe.

Quote
I am sad to share with you that I need to cancel my remaining solo tour dates in Europe. Unfortunately, due to the current climate of uncertainty, and related logistical challenges, it is not possible for me to continue the tour – indeed six of my concerts have already been cancelled by venues who are having to respond to various governmental guidelines. This new recital program is very close to my heart, and I will work on finding opportunities to share it with my fans in Europe sometime in the future. I’m sending love and healing energy to everyone affected by the Coronavirus and other illnesses in Europe and across the globe, including in my home country of China. Take care of yourselves, and each other.


Not surprised. Lang Lang cancelled his Freiburg concert as well.
After La Scala cancelled and shut its doors it was inevitable.
Originally Posted by johnstaf
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Instead of just walking onstage in sunglasses I think she should have explained why she did so to the audience.


I think that would have been a very bad idea. She was there to play music.

She should be free to wear sunglasses without having to explain herself.
Of course, she's free to offer no explanation but wearing sunglasses is so unusual and bizarre looking she might have saved herself a lot of trouble with a simple explanation. Maybe she thought her rationale was too personal to reveal but, if not, why not explain things or at least offer some reason to the audience? I'm sure many in the audience were thinking "What's going on?" and more distracted by the glasses than they would have been if she had made an explanation.

I went to a high school band concert where the band director wore sunglasses and explained that he had just seen an ophthalmologist who diagnosed a possible eye problem and told him to wear sunglasses.
Lucas Debargue canceled his tour of Italy.
The Noontime Concerts in San Francisco are streaming concerts from their archives: Noontime Concerts.
Yesterday the 92d Street Y live-streamed Jonathan Biss playing the last 3 Beethoven piano sonatas from his living room. Replay is available here:
Biss, Beethoven Op. 109, 110, 111
Biss is such a thoughtful player. Opus 109 made me think of this, from Jan Swafford’s biography of LvB (here, writing about the 3d symphony):
That journey, from suffering to joy, is a story Beethoven enacted over and over in his music, and in the whole of his life.... Again and again in his music he returned to an ending in joy.”

There is a wonderful video of Biss playing the Opus 109 Variations in a master class with Daniel Barenboim, posted on YouTube a dozen years ago.
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