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Posted By: 255 Feinberg - Sirodeau plays 2 preludes from Op. 8 - 03/29/15 10:22 AM
For the few Feinberg lovers here, Sirodeau posted a video of two of the four preludes from Op. 8.

[video:youtube]APuNKHgbB_A[/video]

Christophe Sirodeau is the pianist who made the beautiful 2 CDs of all Feinberg sonatas, together with Nikolaos Samaltano. He also did other CDs, including the first piano concerto.

The first prelude here (No.2) is especially interesting because it clearly reminds us of Feinberg's third sonata.
The climax is almost the same of that of the sonata's second movement (the marcia funebre).
The third sonata was indeed published only after Feinberg's death, as he reused part of it for the first piano concerto.

So it's like if the sonata could be intended as a draft from which the composer drew ideas to use for other works. In reality, the sonata is maybe his most powerful work and stands very well by itself in those 3 movements which build constant tension and desperation until it explodes in the majestic third movement which is a sonata by itself (III. Sonata - Allegro appassionato); a final movement that starts with passion and speed and never slow down; it's like if in that movement Feinberg is venting all the pain that he accumulated in the previous two, trying to release all the suffering and reaching a state of bliss.

But in all movements, and also in this prelude (No.2) we have this impression that Feinberg has something inside that he needs to give vent to, and the climax is so powerful that after it the listener really feels better. Still, the dark atmosphere doesn't go away, and the piece ends calmly but with no sign of contentedness.
It's beyond me why the Feinberg sonatas aren't more widely performed. Thanks for this find.
Glad to see Sirodeau being mentioned here! A fine pianist and composer who has done more for Feinberg promotion than almost anybody else. And a very friendly person as well, got to know him last year.

As for why Feinberg is not performed more often, I think one of the reasons is that this music is truly difficult to play, and requires a lot of thought, and work at the piano. I have looked at some Feinberg scores on and off over the years, but have decided that I need to wait, that I would need more time to bring it to a decent level.


I wish someone would be interested in bringing up the piano concertos, but it's not easy to convince anyone into doing that. Besides, the scores are so rare and hard to find...
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