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Baldwin Concert Grand

Posted By: Bagong

Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 01:06 PM

Hello:

I am thinking about purchasing a 1909 Baldwin concert grand 9' for my son. I have yet to arrange for a tech to check on it as I am want to get some idea on the reputation of a Baldwin piano from that era.

How is the 1909 Baldwin concert grand compared to the SD-10? The harp is different.

I asked pictures of the soundboard and it seems to be in good shape. I will attach them when I figure out how to attach pics in this forum.

Thank you.
Suti
Posted By: Just Steven

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 01:47 PM

Originally Posted by Bagong
The harp is different.

Hardly-- The 1909's is a modern design.

In 1909, it was made only for the rich. Today's isn't.
The 1909's was a golden age piano. If the highest note could sustain up to standard duration and no cracks on the bridge, it could even be better than SD-10 in tone quality.
Posted By: Dale Fox

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 03:33 PM

It's old. There is no way to look at pictures and have any idea of it's condition. Pianos are machines and as such need maintenance. You need a GOOD technician to evaluate it before you make a decision.
Posted By: terminaldegree

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 03:46 PM

How kind of a gesture! A few questions that may help to elicit a better answer from us: What level of player is your son, and how intensely will the piano be used? How original is the piano, and what has been replaced (and when, and by whom)? Has the piano been in an area of the country with wide seasonal humidity swings? It's good that you're going to have it inspected - the current condition of the piano (now over a century old) is 100 times more important than the instrument's reputation. A visual inspection of a soundboard is not a useful indicator of its performance. I've seen some great looking ones that have sub-par ringtime and others that look like Swiss cheese that performed better than I'd have guessed.

Do keep in mind used concert grands are notoriously difficult to sell, so it's a buyer's market in that sense, but it's even more important that you choose wisely-- otherwise your son may end up having to dispose of an unsellable "dog" of a piano if things don't work out.

Just Steven- can you clarify your "for the rich" comment? It doesn't make sense. Also your suggestion about listening to the duration of the "highest note", however well intentioned, is a really bad way to judge sustain, as a 2-minute adjustment to the high treble strike point can make a huge difference. Did you mean to say the "killer" (5th) octave, perhaps?
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:11 PM

Hello All:

Thank you for the comments. How can I attach pictures? It seems to ask me to point to a URL.

My son has been playing piano for 18 months now and he practices ~2 hr a day. We (he plays and I support) got into piano so that he can "soften" his personality and help him to be good in math. He is 12. Seeing how he is progressing - I thought to get him a good piano that he can use to play for his "lifetime". Honestly, I don't want him to be a concert pianist, but for him to be good enough that he can enjoy for the rest of his life.

How can I get a good tech in the St. Paul (Minnesota)? Any recommendation?

Thank you.
Suti
Posted By: PianoWorksATL

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:14 PM

Baldwin's concert grands went through numerous changes between 1909 and the SD-10. I would not dub that a "Golden Era" for Baldwin as they really hit their stride later.

Is this a restored piano? original? partially rebuilt?

Keep in mind that concert grand piano are similar to race cars. They tend to be incredibly well made with some of the best materials and workmanship, but they are also only advantageous to the user when they are "race ready".

If it is fully restored or recently fully restored, pursue it. If you intend to buy the body and restore it as a project with a top shop, consult with the shop you intend to use. If it's just old and of mystery condition but seems interesting, you should probably pass.
Posted By: Ed McMorrow, RPT

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:26 PM

All the pre SD-6 Baldwin concert grands I have seen have problems with the strike point in the lower treble area, Note 50 up to note 65. The agraffes and lower V-bar position on the casting is too close to the hammer line to produce best tone. The error is too great to be able to solve by gluing the hammers on the shanks longer and still have the action function properly.
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:28 PM

You can find a registered piano technician (RPT) by clicking on this link and entering your zip code:

Find an RPT

There may be other competent technicians in your area who are not members, but you'll have to search for them (word of mouth, referral, Google search, etc).
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:35 PM

I have a confessed affinity for old Baldwins, but as terminaldegree mentioned above, the individual piano's condition is paramount. Don't rely on boilerplate advice based on brands, ages or eras. If you like the piano enough to consider it, then have it inspected. That will give you concrete information on which to base a decision.

Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 04:50 PM

Originally Posted by Bagong
How can I attach pictures? It seems to ask me to point to a URL.


If you have the pictures hosted somewhere, you can just paste in a link. Or, if you want the actual picture to show up in this thread, and you're using the "Full Reply" editor, you can click the "Enter an image" button and paste the link into the prompt.

Alternatively, you can host them here on PianoWorld, but the process is somewhat cryptic.
Posted By: Keith D Kerman

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 05:03 PM

I would strongly suggest getting in touch with Kieran Wells at Wells Piano in your area. http://www.wellspianos.com/
Posted By: terminaldegree

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 05:04 PM

PM me if you like. I know a good tech/rebuilder in Stillwater.
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 07:05 PM

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/galleries/2597557.html#Post2597557
Posted By: David-G

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 08:14 PM

You can find instructions for posting pictures here.
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 09:46 PM

Thank you all for the pointers. I am able to post the pictures per instruction from David-G. See previous posting and also the link below:

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/galleries/2597557.html#Post2597557

I don't know the answers to many of the questions that you asked - but I will call the seller and schedule a piano tech to come and check it out.

I am interested in this Baldwin as the store is willing to consider a trade (plus some TBD cash from me) for my Steinway A (85 keys). That Steinway did not play loud at all, but there is no buzzing. The soundboard has cracks (visible) and I counted that there are 11 screws on the ribs which anchored them to the soundboard. I figured that it is not worthwhile to restore this Steinway.
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 10:09 PM

Nice color! Interesting to see something different than the usual.
Posted By: Karl Watson

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 10:36 PM

Note very carefully the preceding post by Ed McMorrow. If he says that something can't be changed or fixed, you can be sure of it.
The great days of the Baldwin concert grand came many years later.

Karl Watson,
Staten Island, NY
Posted By: JohnSprung

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 11:05 PM


For anything Baldwin, always check with Robert Estrin at Living Pianos in Santa Ana. He's an expert on them, and usually has several in stock, including concert grands.

Posted By: S. Phillips

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/23/16 11:53 PM

The pictures provided are not very helpful. Try to get some of the action, tuning pin area and cast iron plate. This is not a particularly desirable model. Baldwin's smaller grands of the same period were better. Definitely have a tech look at it but try to find a rebuilder, not a regular tuner who may not have much experience with Baldwins of this age.

If you are trying to get a performance quality piano for an advanced student, this will not be it.
Posted By: huaidongxi

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 01:07 AM

Bagong, if you wish to give your child the priceless boon of a piano to have for his lifetime, choosing a piano at the end of its life span is contrary to your intentions. there are some vintage grands, properly restored, that would fulfill your desires, but you have been given a number of yellow and orange caution lights by folks here who know the old baldwin grands. enjoy the quest and buona fortuna.
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 02:05 AM

Hello All:

Thank you for all the suggestions. After listening to your comment - it is best that I pass on this Baldwin and look for other pianos. I will save more money toward a better piano.

This forum is very helpful - I really appreciate it.
Posted By: Just Steven

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 02:44 AM

Originally Posted by Bagong
I will save more money toward a better piano.

Don't invest too much on piano. You don't need it a good piano to become a good musician.
Posted By: Rickster

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 02:54 AM

Originally Posted by JustSteven
Don't invest too much on piano. You don't need it a good piano to become a good musician.

True.

But a nice piano is fun to play and a lot more pleasurable to play than playing a piano of poor quality or in poor condition. By the same token, if you enjoy playing the piano more, you will play more often, and your playing skills will improve.

And, while a piano is an investment to an extent, it is also an expendable/consumable item more so than an investment. In other words, they do wear out and deteriorate with time...

Just my .02.

Rick
Posted By: Just Steven

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 03:07 AM

Johann Sebastian Bach did not have a piano.
Handel only had a harpsichord.
Mozart's piano wasn't good, and he rarely played it; he mostly played a clavier.

Consumerism is full of hypes.
Posted By: vancamp

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 04:22 AM

I assume you have enough room to easily place a concert grand in your home. If the intent is for your 12 yo son, however, in a few years he may not have that kind of room. A nice 6-7 foot grand is likely to be adequate and more practical.
Posted By: JohnSprung

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 07:32 AM


A concert grand that's not up to snuff for a concert venue, but still very good, is likely to be the most cost effective piano you can buy. I have one. If you have the room, keep looking for concert grands. So few people have the room that prices on used 9 ft. pianos are surprisingly low.

Figure on the piano staying where it is when your son goes to college. He likely won't have room for any acoustic piano there, more likely just a slab digital, and the school's practice room pianos. He'll come home more often if it means both a good grand and laundry.... ;-)

Posted By: terminaldegree

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 12:43 PM

Originally Posted by Just Steven
Johann Sebastian Bach did not have a piano.
Handel only had a harpsichord.
Mozart's piano wasn't good, and he rarely played it; he mostly played a clavier.

Consumerism is full of hypes.


The return of Gyro for the holidays- a Festivus miracle!
Posted By: Davdoc

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 02:45 PM

Originally Posted by Just Steven
Johann Sebastian Bach did not have a piano.
Handel only had a harpsichord.
Mozart's piano wasn't good, and he rarely played it; he mostly played a clavier.

Consumerism is full of hypes.


According to a WikiPedia article, which apparently did have a reference that I didn't have time or authority to verify, J.S. Bach did own some instruments in his estate. He certainly didn't like pianos of his time, still at the instruments' infancy.

Bach's estate

It's true that professional pianists don't always have the most expensive or exotic instruments. Many of them, if heavily engaged, are constantly on concert tours that they barely spend time on their own piano(s).
Posted By: DrewBone

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 02:56 PM

I don't think that purchasing a 9' anything for a 12 yo child who's only been playing for 18 months is very wise. What's your son currently playing on? Is it not sufficient?

Regards,
Andy
Posted By: Miguel Rey

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 04:10 PM

Sound advice given by some regarding getting the piano checked out 100% by a qualified tech with experience or you may end up with a nice looking piece of furniture if the piano can't hold tune or starts breaking strings.

I would also not pay much attention to those trying to lecture you and whether or not a concert grand piano is suitable for your son. Buy what you can afford and what you want and have enough space for. Besides I think one would be able to develop better technique from a large grand with a good action.
Posted By: Ed A. Hall

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/24/16 04:33 PM

The soundboard wood appears very dark. If the wood action parts are dark as well, they are going to very brittle. But it's possible that it has been replaced. That's why it's important to hire a qualified tech with rebuilding experience to check it out before proceeding. If you do go check it out, share some recordings using an iPhone or something like a portable Zoom device. Often, just the way it sounds is a quick way to rule out something.
Posted By: PianoWorksATL

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/26/16 03:58 PM

Originally Posted by terminaldegree
Originally Posted by Just Steven
Johann Sebastian Bach did not have a piano.
Handel only had a harpsichord.
Mozart's piano wasn't good, and he rarely played it; he mostly played a clavier.

Consumerism is full of hypes.


The return of Gyro for the holidays- a Festivus miracle!
grin In the spirit of the holidays, I will not ridicule Steven's logic.

The musical immortals might have excelled with a stick, a rock and some twine, but the rest of us mortals need encouragement from an instrument that inspires, in whatever level we can reach for.

To the OP, work towards a few broad criteria first like size and budget where there are examples to be found in the market. You may quickly be able to weed out the potentials from the non-starters.
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/26/16 05:06 PM

Thank you for the sound advises.

My son originally had a Rolland electric piano that we bought used, but then the piano teacher recommended a real acoustic piano. Currently, my son has a Knabe 5'8" grand from 1924 - it is a player model. We replaced the hammers and have it regulated, but it does not play as loud as the Knabe 5'1" (of around the same era) that his sister has. His Knabe only has 1 very thin but tight hair line crack and her Knabe is about the same, but I was expecting that the 5'8" would play louder - especially at the base. Is it because the tech did not "voice" the hammers and it is expected that new hammers will play "soft"?

We got both piano from two older ladies who wanted to pass their pianos for younger children to learn, so we only paid shipping cost. We were given a Steinway A (85 keys) by another kind hearted lady. It does not play loud also but no buzzing.

May be the first thing that I should do is to find a good expert locally to check if some minor work could be done on his Knabe and the Steinway to make them louder. I live in New Hampshire - if any of you knows piano technician in the area who can give deep technical assessment.

While I am investing time and money for both of them to learn piano (as long as they practice), I am not expecting any of them to become a musician to earn a living. I just want them to be able to enjoy music and help their formative brains to develop for good math/science foundation. I was considering the Baldwin simply because the store St. Paul is willing to trade with the Steinway and I do have a corner in the house that will fit the Baldwin well.

Thank you again for the kind replies.




Posted By: David-G

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/26/16 05:51 PM

Originally Posted by Just Steven
Johann Sebastian Bach did not have a piano.
Handel only had a harpsichord.
Mozart's piano wasn't good, and he rarely played it; he mostly played a clavier.

Consumerism is full of hypes.


Mozart's piano wasn't good? For the last decade of his life Mozart had a piano by Walter, perhaps the most famous maker in Vienna at this time. As a virtuoso pianist, he would have wanted the best.

"As a born pianist," writes Eva Bandura-Skoda, an Austrian musicologist and an expert on history of fortepiano, 'Mozart understandably wanted to own the very best concert grand available. His instrument, still remains the best fortepiano of the period, an excellent concert grand, precious not only because Mozart gave his many subscription concerts on it, but also because of its quality."

See this article.

"Klavier" is a generic German word for a keyboard instrument. It could refer to a harpsichord, clavichord or a piano.

Handel only had a harpsichord? A harpsichord can be a magnificent instrument. Certainly the Ruckers copy in the Handel House in London is a superb instrument, see here. I believe that Handel had an harpsichord like this.
Posted By: Just Steven

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/26/16 08:04 PM

Originally Posted by David-G


Mozart's piano wasn't good? For the last decade of his life Mozart had a piano by Walter, perhaps the most famous maker in Vienna at this time. As a virtuoso pianist, he would have wanted the best.


Mozart's piano is a museum in Vienna. Go compare it with Baldwin of golden age.
Originally Posted by David-G

"Klavier" is a generic German word for a keyboard instrument. It could refer to a harpsichord, clavichord or a piano.

The history says it's Virginal--it's no piano or harpsichord.
Originally Posted by David-G

Handel only had a harpsichord? A harpsichord can be a magnificent instrument.

I did not say it's not magnificent. It's no piano either.

You to proved my point.
Posted By: David-G

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/26/16 09:43 PM

I am afraid I am confused. You are saying that Mozart rarely played his piano, because it was not a Golden Age instrument?
Posted By: Piano Practice

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/27/16 01:23 AM

I recently had a chance to play on SD-10 (restored, circa 1979) in a Nashville store... It was an exceptional piano... there's a huge difference between the 1909 era (model D?) and what Baldwin eventually produced with the SD-10... My own perferance is something more modern... I would stay away from something that old. If you want to continue though, you might want to find out what the history is for this one...why is the seller wanting to sell (are they trying to unload it?). Has it ever been restored? Also, if you have a friend that can really play well and "test drive" it , that may help give an objective opinion... just me saying..

(Bach had access to massive pipe organs in his church 🤔)

Thanks
Posted By: Norbert

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/27/16 02:19 AM

Quote
Just Steven- can you clarify your "for the rich" comment? It doesn't make sense. Also your suggestion about listening to the duration of the "highest note", however well intentioned, is a really bad way to judge sustain, as a 2-minute adjustment to the high treble strike point can make a huge difference.


Amazing how many "top technicians" I have seen doing this very test over the years.

IMHO a total waste in determining a piano's musical appeal. With nothing also being revealed about its technical condition...

P.S. 9' Baldwins can be great pianos - if finding right model!

Norbert smile
Posted By: Jeff Clef

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/27/16 03:27 PM

"...I am afraid I am confused. You are saying that Mozart rarely played his piano, because it was not a Golden Age instrument?..."

...which was well in the future, on his personal timeline. But the good news is, that Mozart generated his own Golden Age.

About the OP's wish for his childrens' current pianos to "play louder." This is a request we don't hear every day around here. The usual prayers are for ways to make pianos in the home less loud, for the sake of the wife, the neighbors, or the writer's own hearing. But if I understand the question, I think Bagong is saying that he wants a greater dynamic range for the three pianos already in the home, which will afford greater control of the whole sound envelope. Hopefully, ppp to ffff (and a back action which works properly for the tone quality effect of the sostenuto pedal). That's what I would want.

Two 5'8" Knabe's of the Baltimore era, both with cracked soundboards, and a smaller Steinway--- if I have it right. So, I am wondering if he really needs three grands in his house, all of them loud? A technician who knows how to voice might help him with what he has. Also, the rooms where each of the pianos live might be evaluated for some acoustic treatment, so that they give back more of what these pianos are already giving.

Again, usually we hear people pleading for acoustic treatments to reduce volume, curb sonic distortions, and increase detail, but the science can certainly go both ways. Finding a qualified person could be a challenge, but some guidance could be gotten from manufacturers of acoustic treatment products, and they may also know of practioners in New Hampshire. If he can find out what architects have designed performance venues like halls (or studios), they may be willing to point the way to their consultants.

But--- why not sell all the older pianos which are not sounding as you wish, and buy a single modern piano at least seven feet long? I think that will get you most of what you want, as long as you have a competent piano tech to bring out the best of what it has to offer in those critical first five years.

Posted By: Ed A. Hall

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/27/16 03:52 PM

Is this the same piano on eBay for $6999?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/252620202370?redirect=mobile
Posted By: PhilipInChina

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/27/16 06:25 PM

On a serious note to the OP, if you have the space for a 9' piano, you really can get some amazing deals on them, simply because most people don't! The problem is selling it again if you want to at some later stage.

I think plenty of youngsters would think it very cool to have a full size concert grand on which to practice.

Perhaps a little less seriously, on the point of the pianos used by great composers, just think how much more Mozart could have achieved with a digital. The sound of a dog bark, a car crash etc.
Posted By: Bagong

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 12/30/16 07:52 PM

@Ed A. Hall: Yes - that is the piano. It is located in St. Paul but I live in NH. They are willing to trade with the Steinway I have plus some cash. I am not sure if I should go that route anymore - as it may be best to get good technicians to fix what I have.

@Jeff Clef: Thank you for explaining what I meant by louder. That Steinway and the 5'8" Knabe sound somewhat muffled when compared with the 5'1" Knabe. Given the same "force" to press the keys, they produce less volume. Sorry for my layman description as I don't understand the terms.

About selling those grands - I thought about it, but with so many free pianos on craiglist, nobody is buying old grand pianos with cracked boards. The Steinway may have some value but not the Knabes.

Thank you again for all the responses. I found couple pianos tech from the Piano Technicians Guild. I will post what I learn which can be done to improve what I have.
Posted By: Del

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/03/17 04:43 AM

Originally Posted by terminaldegree
... Just Steven- can you clarify your "for the rich" comment? It doesn't make sense. Also your suggestion about listening to the duration of the "highest note", however well intentioned, is a really bad way to judge sustain, as a 2-minute adjustment to the high treble strike point can make a huge difference. Did you mean to say the "killer" (5th) octave, perhaps?


In the book Piano Tone Building, during the April 16, 1919 meeting in New York, Mark P Campbell said, "... I might answer that question by giving you a little history. I think it will be in order. Up to six years ago the grand piano product in our industry was about 9,000; relatively speaking, that is a very small percentage compared with about 300,000 players and uprights. The trade has used the grand piano ever since the first one was overstrung, in 1856, as a prestige builder.

Manufacturers have not specially cared to build grands, cabinetmakers disliked to build cases because of the uncertainty of the size of scale. A few cases would be made and then the maker would change the model.

It has always seemed to me that in the natural evolution of piano building the small grand would have followed the square but the manufacturers brought the upright in and continued to use the grand as a prestige builder, presenting it as a superior instrument. Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been spent by manufacturers and dealers presenting it as the superior piano. We look for it on the concert stage; in the best homes; we find them in the studios, but there it has stopped."

ddf
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/04/17 04:00 AM

Interesting perspective from 1919! For better or worse, though, grands still seem to be people's preference. As sales for uprights dwindle, sales of grands has grown steadily (at least though '06).

From this post:

U.S. Piano Sales:
[Linked Image]
Posted By: Del

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/04/17 04:32 AM

Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Interesting perspective from 1919! For better or worse, though, grands still seem to be people's preference. As sales for uprights dwindle, sales of grands has grown steadily (at least though '06).

From this post:

U.S. Piano Sales:
[Linked Image]

Campbell owned the piano factory most technicians love to hate -- Brambach. He was committed to building "a grand piano every working man in America could afford." His company revolutionized grand piano manufacturing. Many of the technologies Brambach developed have gone on to make today's low-cost grand pianos possible.

ddf
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/04/17 04:50 AM

Originally Posted by Del
...Brambach. He was committed to building "a grand piano every working man in America could afford." His company revolutionized grand piano manufacturing. Many of the technologies Brambach developed have gone on to make today's low-cost grand pianos possible.

Interesting! I wouldn't mind reading more about that if you have a reference**. Anyway, perhaps that's why there are still quite a few Brambachs floating around out there. There seems to be no shortage of them on Craigslist. smile

** Is it discussed in Piano Tone Building?
Posted By: Del

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/04/17 05:32 AM

Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by Del
...Brambach. He was committed to building "a grand piano every working man in America could afford." His company revolutionized grand piano manufacturing. Many of the technologies Brambach developed have gone on to make today's low-cost grand pianos possible.

Interesting! I wouldn't mind reading more about that if you have a reference**. Anyway, perhaps that's why there are still quite a few Brambachs floating around out there. There seems to be no shortage of them on Craigslist. smile

** Is it discussed in Piano Tone Building?

Yes. Campbell's comments are found in Chapter 37, APRIL 16, 1919, "SMALL GRANDS." The rest comes from my experience studying Brambach grands and figuring out how they were constructed and then comparing that with earlier and later instruments made by other makers.

ddf
Posted By: Retsacnal

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/21/18 07:56 AM

Originally Posted by Del
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by Del
...Brambach. He was committed to building "a grand piano every working man in America could afford." His company revolutionized grand piano manufacturing. Many of the technologies Brambach developed have gone on to make today's low-cost grand pianos possible.

Interesting! I wouldn't mind reading more about that if you have a reference**. Anyway, perhaps that's why there are still quite a few Brambachs floating around out there. There seems to be no shortage of them on Craigslist. smile

** Is it discussed in Piano Tone Building?

Yes. Campbell's comments are found in Chapter 37, APRIL 16, 1919, "SMALL GRANDS." The rest comes from my experience studying Brambach grands and figuring out how they were constructed and then comparing that with earlier and later instruments made by other makers.

ddf

Sorry I missed this (my wife was in chemo and hospitalized twice last January).

Is this the book: http://www.ptg.org/scripts/4disapi.dll/store/piano-tone-building/90/#pricing
Posted By: Colin Dunn

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/22/18 02:32 AM

Checked the eBay link. That Baldwin sold for the asking price of $7K. Did the OP buy it?
Posted By: Ed McMorrow, RPT

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/22/18 03:02 AM

Unfortunately for Brambach and even more so for purchasers of his grands; the proportions he used for striking point on the strings are way away from what works to make a rich tone. His desire to create a design that is as simple to build as possible is one any responsible designer would employ.

With the Hybrid wire scaling protocols and Longitudinal mode modeling now being developed, I see much potential to making a sub 6' grand that is stunning in dynamic response, clarity and richness.

I have a 5'1" 1979 Chickering model 501 that I recently employed these technologies in and the result is wonderful. It has my patented Fully Tempered Duplex Scale and modifications to the bridge to reduce the negative effects of Longitudinal mode on the transverse modes.
Posted By: Steve Chandler

Re: Baldwin Concert Grand - 01/22/18 04:09 AM

Originally Posted by Keith D Kerman
I would strongly suggest getting in touch with Kieran Wells at Wells Piano in your area. http://www.wellspianos.com/

I've shopped Kierand's store and it's a great place. I highly recommend it. Kieran stocks grands from Hailun to Bosendorfer and many great brands in between.
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