2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
51 members (accordeur, AndyP, David B, 1957, Bruce In Philly, 36251, computron, 14 invisible), 419 guests, and 383 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957625 03/14/08 05:37 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
By different degrees I mean how many notes you can name at once. Try playing four random notes on the piano simultaneously and naming them all.

My students and I can identify single notes on the piano correctly 100% of the time. I guess I needed to clarify my previous posts. The youngest from this group of students has problems naming a second note. It's almost as if her ears were distracted by the previous note.

By the way, I just took the perfect-pitch test at the UCSF website (http://perfectpitch.ucsf.edu/survey/page1.php). I got a 32.75 for "pure tone" and 34.75 for "piano tone," which indicates I have perfect pitch. That test went way too fast, and I know some of my answers are swayed by the previous note or "pure tone"--I hate those! You only have 3 seconds to identify each tone, and there are 80 of them.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957626 03/14/08 05:52 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
Here's a quote from the article, "UCSF researchers seek subjects for perfect-pitch study":

Some individuals are so familiar with the tones, maintains UCSF graduate student Siamak Baharloo, that they associate each one with a specific color, which is a more specialized gift called synesthesia.

An estimated one in every 2,000 people has perfect pitch; among musicians, the rate is 15 percent, according to the researchers.

Baharloo and several others who comprise the research team want to isolate the gene that is partially responsible for perfect pitch. They have grander plans, however, than merely distinguishing the musically inclined from the tone deaf.

The study may be the first to pinpoint a human trait that is both hereditary and learned. That is not to say that perfect pitch is either learned or inherited. The researchers believe that an individual must have both a genetic predisposition and musical training during a critical developmental stage of childhood to acquire it.

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957627 03/14/08 10:25 PM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,595
P
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,595
Interesting AZN. Thanks for your reply.

What I am curious about is, can a person have perfect pitch and not be musical or a musician?

I'll check out the website you posted, it may have the answer to my question.

Edit: Just read the last part of your post, which does answer my question. It looks like, yes, one does need musical training in order to have perfect pitch.


Private Piano Teacher,
member MTNA and Piano Basics Foundation
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957628 03/15/08 03:25 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
One of the choirs I was with occasionally joined another choir for joint performances where each choir took turns. The person heading the other choir had perfect pitch of the kind that she was her own tuning fork. She warmed up her choir by singing the note and then off they would go on some scale or other exercise.

Their choir sang together with our choir for one number, and the perfect pitch person was directly behind me. The piano was not tuned to 440. She sang at 440 regardless, steadily. Our altos did what our altos always did ... they slowly drifted downward hovering around a quarter tone below, which was sort of close to the piano's pitch. Our sopranos did what they always did, drifting down with the altos so that they tended to harmonize. Mrs. PP lustily sang with her beautiful operatic voice behind my ear at 440. She seemed incapable of adjusting to the piano, or of harmonizing to the voices around her. There were three pitches going: the choir which was a bit below the piano, then the piano, and then the voice in my ear which was extremely steady, but not in synch with anybody.

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957629 03/15/08 05:36 PM
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,576
N
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
N
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,576
KeysOnTheCeiling--

Oliver Sacks has a book out called "Musicophilia" which a chapter dedicated to perfect pitch. I can't recall all the research studies he cited, but some cultures have a much higher percentage of people with perfect pitch than others. He suggested that it's inborn and we lose it, rather than being able to be taught it. He had several case studies of people having neurological damage that interfered with their previously perfect pitch. I highly recommend the book, and you can skip any chapters that don't interest you because it doesn't really build on itself.

Nancy


Estonia 168
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957630 03/30/08 06:47 PM
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
I understood, either correctly or not,that some people can listen to a piece of music and then play along with it in the same key by ear. They do not have to have any formal training of music or an instrument. Equally people can sing to a song without being taught. It is part of the human brain function. I have played the piano without ever having had any lessons, since about 7, taught by my mother.

These people are then said to have perfect pitch.

I have a friend who has a 9 year old boy that has learned to play the violin to a high standard by the Suzuki method, he is now part of the Scottish Youth Orchestra. And is learning the piano the same way. He is doing well on that too I saw him play something without music on my piano the other day.The Suzuki method seems very good and they do eventually read the music but only after learning to play the basic scales (I think)

He is such a wonderful natural musician and has been since about 5 years old I have never seen any child, personally,like him.

On another aspect of pitch I could never read music but have played the piano for some 70 years.

I started with my mother showing me how to play 'Three blind Mice' I soon learned that and then more songs that children sang (I could never sing.)

I rather think it is rare to find the true ear pianists judging by this website. I do not wish to sound rare as a species, that would be an awful show off.

I cannot listen (blindfold) to a played note and tell you what it is, but I can go to the piano and play it. Then I can tell you what it is, how strange?

I find great pleasure in playing along to CDs and the piano is up to pitch OK. Most CDs are too. But Vinyl LPs often aren't also the player is soon out of speed precision so that drops the pitch awfully.

Alan (swingal)

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957631 03/31/08 01:05 AM
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
I thought people with perfect pitch - absolute pitch, to be more specific - could always identify all the notes played in the diatonic scale even if you played a cluster chord. I have a friend with perfect pitch, and he can tell you to the degree of two cents how sharp or flat it is. He did have a course in microtones which helped hone his ear, but even before that he had absolute pitch.

The difficult thing about absolute pitch is that the pitches themselves are absolute, but the names are arbitrary. I think I'd go nuts trying to think about it. Thankfully, I don't have perfect pitch. I have another couple of friends who have it, and knowing what note the microwave beeps on, hearing that steady low B buzz in flourescent lights, identifying all the tones in ambulance sirens without even trying, sometimes it drives them crazy.

To a degree we all have a sense of pitch, otherwise how would we be able to phrase our speech and understand vocal patterns? So it goes to show that the idea of absolute pitch can be played with as well. Me, I've always had good pitch; I can tell if things are sharp or flat. Ask me to sing a note and I can do it, though I will guarantee you that I'll be about a half-step flat. I do not have absolute pitch, however. I've got good relative pitch, and to some I may fool them into thinking I have absolute pitch. I can name a note if played on the piano. I can name notes with up to five notes played on the piano, even if it's a cluster chord. When it comes to pure tone, that's different.

And that basically gets to the crux of the matter. Pitch is determined by so many factors that eerily accurate absolute pitch is indeed something that is quite rare in the population. We rely on overtones and the harmonic series to determine what's what. This is why when you take a test such as the Stanford one, you probably will do worse on pure tones than on piano tones. I know I did (I scored within the fourth rank of absolute pitch, which in layman's terms means I have dodgy pitch). In addition, a lot of us are so familiar with the character of certain notes on the piano (such as low C, the one two ledger lines down from the bass clef; middle c; high A, A 440, and for me, Eb) that it becomes a test of how well we've memorized those pitches, their overtones, and their emotional worth to ourselves. F to me is always going to be the start of the Haydn sonata in F. D is the sound of an a minor chord being played so that the violinists can tune. A has the quality of an oboe (gee, I wonder why? Other As are summarily strained sounding; the soprano A in the high register, the tenor A in the bottom of the break, the bass A that they have to dig deep in order to sing). C is do, Ab is Duet from Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words, Eb is laid back and mellow and quite possibly my favorite note.

Anyhow, I've managed to digress. Cultures that produce more people with "perfect pitch" tend to be the ones that use tonal languages. The Chinese have a high incidence of people with perfect pitch. I am sure the Thai and Viet people also have a very good sense of pitch, as do the Basques, the Norwegians, and various Africans (sorry, I can't remember which languages!). When your meaning and your language hinges on pitch, your population tends to be more in tune, pun not intended, with identifying pitch.

For those of us not so gifted, and I can see how it is both a gift and a curse, we can strengthen what we know about pitch and add more pitch landmarks by undertaking some serious solfege study in fixed do. It helped me immensely... and then we got to solfege 4, which was all atonal music. You know you have absolute pitch when you can look at a piece of Schoenberg and sing it perfectly the first time.


Pianist and teacher with a 5'8" Baldwin R and Clavi CLP-230 at home.

New website up: http://www.studioplumpiano.com. Also on Twitter @QQitsMina
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957632 03/31/08 03:10 AM
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
The pitch or correct key? is essential for pure ear players. Then again if you are taught to play in the correct way by reading music, surely the pitch factor is not required.? Would touch and tone be better?

If playing jazz, which is a music of improvisation,then somehow the pianist must play by ear. They compose as they play ? They must know what notes or chords will sound like from practice and memory. And this applies to professional pianists that play in a jazz or swing band.

Also pitch seems to be an over-used word. You either play the correct note or not. The piano may need tuning. It may be flat but can still be played using the correct keys but having a rendition sounding sub-standard.

The amount of off key the piano is, can be very small and the tuner will find these minute pitch in-corrections, good tuners are very talented I think.

If the instrument is out of tune a bit, we still have to play what is the correct note, so the complete domination of the keyboard must be learned. Is that not what we do?

Amateur people like me have simply learned the notes in an octave. Then played scales, then chord patterns and the usual jazz runs and styles.

Playing by ear, IMO, means learning the sounds of the scale note by note, there are only 12, I think. Not that difficult is it? You then develop the ability to make music once the subconscious brain has memorized notes with or without pitch ability as it is impossible to do anything about pitch if the instrument it is out of pitch.

I sometimes play a piano, very reluctantly, that has not been tuned for years. Sounds honky-tonky. Its only redeeming feature is the loose action. But knowing the sounds each key (should)produce is in my head. That is the first requirement to play by ear I think.

No doubt the teachers will not take my view as they see the incorrectness of learning this way.(by ear) And of course they are right. But it suffices for jazz. Perhaps we are using the wrong term 'pitch' when we mean playing by ear.

Please feel free to correct my concept of playing the piano.

Alan.(swingal)

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957633 03/31/08 04:55 AM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 6,274
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 6,274
Quote
Originally posted by swingal:
No doubt the teachers will not take my view as they see the incorrectness of learning this way.(by ear) And of course they are right. But it suffices for jazz. Perhaps we are using the wrong term 'pitch' when we mean playing by ear.
Hi Alan. Don't downplay the value of being able to play by ear, or assume that all teachers do. I played by ear (taught by my father, who was a swing player himself) before I learnt to read music well, and when I came to study harmony formally later on, I found I knew most of it by experience, in practice. That meant I instinctively knew a good chord to use in harmonising, where some of my classmates seemed to just guess, or use a formula, writing something and hoping it sounded good. The aural understanding I gained from that early experience has made me a much better musician.

As to the definitions, I think a sense of pitch is related to playing by ear, but they're not quite the same thing. This good sense of pitch will also enable you to write down a melody you hear (without checking it on the piano), or add a harmony part when singing. Lots of ways for it to show without you playing an instrument, though this is certainly one outcome.

I don't have absolute pitch. I can't tell you what a note is that I hear played. However, if you tell me what that note is, I can then tell you any others you care to play afterwards. That's known as relative pitch, and is a skill which can be developed, and which is very useful indeed.

I include playing by ear in my teaching (a large part of it is recognising and playing intervals) though I teach classical piano. I think it would be rather sad if a pianist was trained to be able to play a Chopin ballade, but couldn't pick out a well-known tune and add a couple of chords.


Du holde Kunst...
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957634 03/31/08 08:56 AM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 45
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 45
Many of the above responses have covered what absolute pitch is.

I have perfect pitch. In my twenty five years of teaching and concert experience, I've yet to see one student that has acquired absolute pitch. I do believe that you're born with it. However, I do find studies involving perfect pitch and early childhood interesting.

As a child, I could play folk tunes by ear at the age of five. However, I was never tested for perfect pitch until the age of eleven. I would encourage students and teachers to do the test at an earlier age.


Daniel E. Friedman, co-owner of www.pianolessons101.com
You CAN learn to play the piano in a fun and positive way.
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957635 03/31/08 09:11 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Dan, could you elucidate on the difference between absolute and perfect pitch? It seems a lot of concepts are being bandied about.

I see too fine a pitch recognition on piano to practically being a handicap because of the banes of equal temperament and the inability to adjust the pitch that you hear. Is there a practical application on piano?

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957636 03/31/08 09:31 AM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 14
C
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
C
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 14
Absolute pitch and perfect pitch are the same thing, just different name.

Playing a tune by ear is the ability of Relative Pitch, not perfect pitch - its the ability to recognise intervals and chords relationships. Only if you can play a tune in the right key without checking against a 'pivot' note is perfect pitch.

Also, I believe that perfect pitch is something you born with, but can be acquired with the correct approach. People with perfect pitch are not all the same, some can recognise notes faster and some can pick out notes from a note cluster but some can't do that. I have perfect pitch since childhood, but its only recently after I really cared about it I realised that my pp has improved.

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957637 03/31/08 09:48 AM
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
Yes, they are the same, Clockwiser, but I wanted to make a distinction between absolute pitch and really really really good relative pitch. Someone with absolute pitch should always be able to name the notes in anything rather effortlessly, whether it is a cluster chord or a car horn. Those of us with relative pitch have to work a little harder, even if the result is the same.

So Keystring, that's why I wanted to make the distinction between the two. Absolute pitch is a gift (and a curse). It's knowing what key it is, no matter what. It's being able to identify all twelve notes in the diatonic scale, not just seven. And sometimes it's knowing what the notes are and being driven to insanity because no one is singing the right ones. The rest of us with "perfect pitch" just have to work and practice at it, even if it seems to other people that we know instantaneously what it is.

You either have absolute pitch or you don't. What you acquire, even if you call it perfect pitch, is going to be relative pitch.


Pianist and teacher with a 5'8" Baldwin R and Clavi CLP-230 at home.

New website up: http://www.studioplumpiano.com. Also on Twitter @QQitsMina
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957638 03/31/08 10:52 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
There is a free on-line test for perfect pitch.

http://perfectpitch.ucsf.edu/study/

Let us know how you do!!

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957639 03/31/08 11:04 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Thanks, Minaku. Dan101 has made a distinction between perfect and absolute pitch in the following:
Quote
I have perfect pitch . In my twenty five years of teaching and concert experience, I've yet to see one student that has acquired absolute pitch.
That is what I'm wondering about.

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957640 03/31/08 12:05 PM
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
I'm thinking he means the rare person who always knows what the note is, knows how sharp or flat it is, and was born that way. To me, one cannot acquire absolute pitch. One can attain "perfect" pitch by practicing a lot and having good aural memory skills, but it's just well-honed relative pitch.

In other words, absolute pitch is determined by nature. You are born with the ability to assign names to frequencies, remember what those frequencies are, and know whether the frequencies you hear match what you've learned. You are also able to tell whether or not the frequency you hear is sharp or flat, whether by a quarter tone or to the cent. This all happens instantly, without any thought.

Relative pitch and its often mislabeled friend, perfect pitch is not inborn, but can be trained and practiced until it is instantaneous. People with very good relative pitch have certain pitch landmarks, can identify notes quickly, but have a harder time discerning sharpness and flatness, as well as have a harder time identifying pure tones (the overtones have a lot to do with this).


Pianist and teacher with a 5'8" Baldwin R and Clavi CLP-230 at home.

New website up: http://www.studioplumpiano.com. Also on Twitter @QQitsMina
Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957641 03/31/08 12:14 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,111
Quote
One can attain "perfect" pitch by practicing a lot and having good aural memory skills, but it's just well-honed relative pitch.
No, it is decidedly not well-honed relative pitch. I went through training by an expert last year, and there is nothing relative about it.

"Perfect" pitch is the ability to recognize a pitch, which is a frequency of sound that has a central tone. It is like recognizing a coffee cup as a coffee cup. In my training I produced the pitches. I was taught to work with both relativity and pitch, and to distinguish the two. Pitch recognition developed well enough that I can hear a tone and press a piano key or play the note of an instrument, and it will be that key. I have not yet acquired the facility for naming because it resides in a place I can't access consciously for words, but I definitely recognnize the pitch.

Another family member has the inborn pitch recognition, and that is practically to the cent.

If you can recognize a pitch independent of music that is totally unrelated to relative pitch.

I still would like to know what Dan101 meant and what his concept is.

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957642 03/31/08 05:05 PM
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,094
To 'currawong',Thankyou for your kind words. I'm fairly happy about my playing, though always trying to improve. I suppose I cannot really say much of real sense, when it comes to theory of music. I just know what I like and try to always improve my playing.

I love playing the piano and now retired (most of the time!)do get more practice in. I have the ability to know what all the keys on the piano scale sound like and as long as I can remember what the first or starting note of a 'song'is I can go ahead and play the piece. Adding tonal embellishments to play jazz styles. I also do my own doodling around making up music for fun.

Certain jazz pianists played purely by ear and never learned to play by music at all. Erroll Garner was one of the finest at that. And he played in some very odd keys.

He wrote the piece called 'Misty' which became a very well known popular piece. When I say wrote I mean composed, someone else wrote it all down, with others to publish in a book of Erroll's compositions.

swingal (Alan)

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957643 03/31/08 05:29 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,555
B
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,555
Thats exactly what I'd like to be able to do!
play by ear..no books/lead sheets..and when somebody steps up and says do know this tune I'd say hum a few bars..know it right off..and play in that persons key!.. or does this only happen in old Bing Crosby movies?

Re: Could someone explain Perfect Pitch to me?
#957644 03/31/08 07:09 PM
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,226
Quote
Originally posted by keystring:
Quote
One can attain "perfect" pitch by practicing a lot and having good aural memory skills, but it's just well-honed relative pitch.
No, it is decidedly not well-honed relative pitch. I went through training by an expert last year, and there is nothing relative about it.

"Perfect" pitch is the ability to recognize a pitch, which is a frequency of sound that has a central tone. It is like recognizing a coffee cup as a coffee cup. In my training I produced the pitches. I was taught to work with both relativity and pitch, and to distinguish the two. Pitch recognition developed well enough that I can hear a tone and press a piano key or play the note of an instrument, and it will be that key. I have not yet acquired the facility for naming because it resides in a place I can't access consciously for words, but I definitely recognnize the pitch.

Another family member has the inborn pitch recognition, and that is practically to the cent.

If you can recognize a pitch independent of music that is totally unrelated to relative pitch.

I still would like to know what Dan101 meant and what his concept is.
I stick to my definition. Relative pitch starts with guide notes. Eventually you know all the notes well enough that they all become guide notes, and you get "perfect" pitch. It's not some magical thing that happens for us, it's process. The more we train, the better we become at it.

Let's use your coffee cup analogy. Those with absolute pitch see a coffee cup - let's use a generic Starbucks mug - and understand that is the coffee cup to beat all coffee cups. When they see another coffee cup they understand it's a coffee cup, but also understand how they would mold it, shape it, and refire it in the kiln to reproduce the exact coffee cup in their minds.

The rest of us see coffee cups and understand that they are coffee cups, but as to how to make that other coffee cup look like a Starbucks cup? No clue. Now, if we learn pottery and practice it we can slowly attain the skills needed to see the process of turning ye olde Waffle House coffee mug into a generic Starbucks coffee mug. Ya dig? You can learn it to a point where it becomes instantaneous. But you will still fall under a separate category than the person who, without prior training even! can change that cup into the one they first learned was a coffee cup.

To that end perfect pitch can be learned. But I would never presume to say I had perfect pitch despite how good I am at recognizing, reproducing, and dictating pitches, because I was not born that way.


Pianist and teacher with a 5'8" Baldwin R and Clavi CLP-230 at home.

New website up: http://www.studioplumpiano.com. Also on Twitter @QQitsMina
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our October 2020 Free Piano Newsletter is Here!
---------------------
3,000,000+!
------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Save my sanity: CLP-785 vs CA-99 vs N1X vs ...
by tofupiano - 10/31/20 06:01 PM
Late '90s Yamaha U1 MSRP/SMP?
by re22 - 10/31/20 06:01 PM
Piano tariffs in the US?
by Sweelinck - 10/31/20 05:11 PM
Kawai Novus NV5 'loud note' problem
by John Dean - 10/31/20 03:54 PM
Beethoven and Bechstein
by OE1FEU - 10/31/20 03:37 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics202,515
Posts3,019,259
Members99,090
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4