2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Spring Into Sound Sale
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
35 members (Djengis, DaveX, EB5AGV, ColonelBogey, clothearednincompo, FloRi89, DPPianoPhil, bluebilly, bilb, Falsch, 11 invisible), 342 guests, and 456 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 16
F
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
F
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 16
I am not a teacher, but took for several years and as an adult, I am thinking about beginning lessons again. One thing that I always wanted to be able to do was arpeggios with the right hand to add flourishes to some simple songs. What is the way you teach your students to do this? Which keys do you start with? I don't know if what I do with three keys (Chords) is really arpeggios or not. I take my left hand and play C-E-G- and then the same thing with my right hand on the next octave and follow behind with the left hand and keep doing that all the way up the keyboard. However, I would love to be able to do arpeggios with the right hand and not hear any breaks as you move your thumb under. I am sure you know what I mean and I appreciate any help you can give. Thanks!


We are not enemies but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic cords of memory shall swell when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of nature.
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
M
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
Start with the white-keyed arpeggios. First you can do C major arpeggio by playing C-E-G-C-G-E-C. The RH fingering should be 1-2-3-5-3-2-1, and LH fingering 5-3-2-1-2-3-5. You can do the same on G-B-D-G-D-B-G (G major), F-A-C-F-C-A-F (F major). You can use this same fingering then for the White-Black-White chords (D major, E Major & A Major), and then B Major.

Once you can do one octave in both hands easily (I usually have students do hands separately then together), then you can work on doing 2 octave arpeggios. To give you an idea of what this is like, you would play C-E-G-C-E-G-C on the way up and the reverse on the way down. The RH fingering would be 1-2-3-1-2-3-5, LH 5-3-2-1-3-2-1. The thumb crosses under finger 3. The way you do this without hearing any breaks is you have to turn the wrist horizontally (like waving hello) to minimize the distance for your thumb to cross under.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 114
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 114
A helpful way to practice making the 2-octave arpeggio sound smoother is to start by playing it very slowly (each note as a half note or quarter note) but focussing primarily on tone quality (keeping them the same level of dynamics) and legato. Once that feels comfortable, try each note as a staccato, then try playing each note twice as you go up and down. That helps your fingers be able to navigate and get set in place where they ought to go. Once your fingers feel comfortable finding the notes, there are lots of creative things you can do with the rhythm to give your hand and fingers more practice - you can do any combination of 16th and 8th notes, swing them, make them into triplets, etc. etc.


Full-time, independent piano instructor; church musician
MTNA, ISMTA, working towards NCTM!
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,595
P
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,595
Quote
Originally posted by Morodiene:
Start with the white-keyed arpeggios. First you can do C major arpeggio by playing C-E-G-C-G-E-C. The RH fingering should be 1-2-3-5-3-2-1, and LH fingering 5-3-2-1-2-3-5. You can do the same on G-B-D-G-D-B-G (G major), F-A-C-F-C-A-F (F major). You can use this same fingering then for the White-Black-White chords (D major, E Major & A Major), and then B Major.

Once you can do one octave in both hands easily (I usually have students do hands separately then together), then you can work on doing 2 octave arpeggios. To give you an idea of what this is like, you would play C-E-G-C-E-G-C on the way up and the reverse on the way down. The RH fingering would be 1-2-3-1-2-3-5, LH 5-3-2-1-3-2-1. The thumb crosses under finger 3. The way you do this without hearing any breaks is you have to turn the wrist horizontally (like waving hello) to minimize the distance for your thumb to cross under.
Morodiene,

I was taught that LH fingering is 5-4-2-1 on all arpeggios except major arpeggios where the third happens to be a black key, like for example: D or A Major and others like these.

This is the fingering I teach.


Private Piano Teacher,
member MTNA and Piano Basics Foundation
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 264
D
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 264
Quote
Originally posted by pianobuff:
Quote
Originally posted by Morodiene:
[b] Start with the white-keyed arpeggios. First you can do C major arpeggio by playing C-E-G-C-G-E-C. The RH fingering should be 1-2-3-5-3-2-1, and LH fingering 5-3-2-1-2-3-5. You can do the same on G-B-D-G-D-B-G (G major), F-A-C-F-C-A-F (F major). You can use this same fingering then for the White-Black-White chords (D major, E Major & A Major), and then B Major.

Once you can do one octave in both hands easily (I usually have students do hands separately then together), then you can work on doing 2 octave arpeggios. To give you an idea of what this is like, you would play C-E-G-C-E-G-C on the way up and the reverse on the way down. The RH fingering would be 1-2-3-1-2-3-5, LH 5-3-2-1-3-2-1. The thumb crosses under finger 3. The way you do this without hearing any breaks is you have to turn the wrist horizontally (like waving hello) to minimize the distance for your thumb to cross under.
Morodiene,

I was taught that LH fingering is 5-4-2-1 on all arpeggios except major arpeggios where the third happens to be a black key, like for example: D or A Major and others like these.

This is the fingering I teach. [/b]
Same here, I don't teach but I was taught that the usual left hand fingering is 5-4-2-1.

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
M
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
I was taught that as well, but I was told it was mainly for the purpose of creating space between fingers 4 & 5. However, you don't get anything like that for the RH, so I figure it's not worth it because you might as well do something like Hanon or another exercise if this is necessary and get it in both hands. I don't see any other reason for the 5-4-2-1 fingering, but let me know if there is another good reason and I'll reconsider. smile


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,757
AJB Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,757
When I was studying piano (I still am, but I mean for examinations) I could never really see the point of learning arpeggios. It seemed like playing scales, which had almost become an end in itself (ABRSM examiners seemed to have an obsession with four octave scales played in various ways).

Then I learnt to play the third movement, presto agitato, of Beehoven's Moonlight Sonata. My model for this was Daniel Barenboims rendition which is, without doubt, exceptionally fast and remarkably clean.

This is an excellent piece to learn to play right hand arpeggios brilliantly well as there are numerous variations in C sharp minor. Well worth the effort. It is also excellent for clean pedaling as the pedal is used barely at all except at some very precise points.

Different versions of the score have different fingering variations, but I use 1235, 1235, 1245, 1235 as I work up the three to four octaves that are covered. The different intervals require fingering variations and this makes a useful exercise.

The octave jumps require good thumb and hand movement technique too.

A


Currently playing 2017 C212 with carbon fibre soundboard, WNG action. Working on Bach, Beethoven, Grieg mainly.
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 129
K
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
K
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 129
There are specific fingerings for arpeggios in each hand and for different keys. Some tricks for working smooth arpeggios are: point your fingers in the direction you are going, relax your arms in downstrokes on strong beats, work with the circular motion your arms take in arpeggio work, kind of a figure eight approach, stay fluid in your motions, the faster you go the lighter you should play each note.


Keith
http://www.keithphillips.net
http://www.freepianoresources.com
http://www.keithphillips.net/SleepyRiverMusic.htm


Keith Phillips

www.keithphillips.net
Piano technique for all levels
www.keithphillips.net/AdvancedPianoSecrets.htm

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Couch to Concert Hall
Couch to Concert Hall
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
One piece to send to outer space
by chopinetto - 04/14/21 09:31 PM
G# ?
by risusSardonicus - 04/14/21 08:01 PM
Kawai baby grand with silent option
by Jay Gunderson - 04/14/21 06:24 PM
Slur then no slur
by Sebs - 04/14/21 05:08 PM
On-Site "Hitch-Pin" fix???
by Duaner - 04/14/21 03:29 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics206,290
Posts3,082,526
Members101,196
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5