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An obscure, favorite word #792999 02/14/04 01:00 PM
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plays88skeys Offline OP
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The word comes from an old Urgic dialect of the tundra, used in the fourth century by the Lappish community that settled near Helsinki after the great Herfftel thaw of AD 342. I hope that's obscure enough.

The word is Hevelspending, it is a noun and means "the gasp made by one who, walking in the morning, smells spring in the air after a long winter."

Isn't that a nice thought for those of us beginning to see the end of a long cold winter? smile

Anyone else have favorite words?


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Re: An obscure, favorite word #793000 02/14/04 01:55 PM
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Ariel Offline
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"Fungible"! I just learned it (unlike, I'm sure, JBryan and many more out there).

It sounds so like what it is too - so "fungy", so real and tangible.

(Great topic, Plays!)

Ariel


If this is coffee, bring me tea. If this is tea, bring me coffee.
~Abraham Lincoln~
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793001 02/14/04 02:03 PM
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zorro Offline
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Fragilisticsuperalafragistic or something like that, I can't remember...
zorro
It just rolls off your tongue, doesn't it?


"I love Beethoven, especially the poems."
Ringo Starr
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793002 02/14/04 02:16 PM
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RKVS1 Offline
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DevilSpending is a verb, includes a gasp now and then, and stems from the LappishDancic community.


I know of a word spoken only by left-handed near-sighted freckled Swedes with brown contact lenses, but, as I am unblemished, I have yet to actually hear it.


Heres a perfectly good audible that has, unfortunately, no associated meaning that I know of. Perhaps you could help.

Barisitude

It smacks of the English law establishment or perhaps could fit into the suppertime meteorologic patter. (No more than 2 vowel substitutions allowed.) smile


As far as "legal" words, my favorites change, but "rictus" (the mouth orifice, or a gaping grin or grimace) always seemed more genteel than "pie-hole".

Bob

Re: An obscure, favorite word #793003 02/14/04 02:50 PM
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Matt G. Offline
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I like the word fulminate with its etymological subtext of being like a bolt of lightning. It's the perfect word to describe the style of so many posts here on Piano World, I'm starting to think we should call the Coffee Room the Fulmination Room! eek


Sacred cows make the best hamburger. - Clemens
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793004 02/14/04 03:07 PM
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I've always liked the German, gemuetlichkeit. (wish I had an umlaut on my keyboard!) [Linked Image]

It means cozy, warm, homey comfort.

Plays I like your word - or at least the concept. I can feel it today!!!

Re: An obscure, favorite word #793005 02/14/04 03:18 PM
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Matt G. Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by plays88keys:
The word comes from an old Urgic dialect of the tundra, used in the fourth century by the Lappish community that settled near Helsinki after the great Herfftel thaw of AD 342. I hope that's obscure enough.

The word is Hevelspending, it is a noun and means "the gasp made by one who, walking in the morning, smells spring in the air after a long winter."
Not meaning to be a killjoy nor a partypooper (yeah, right, it's my calling!), but you realize, of course, that this little bit of fluff you posted is a Stephen Fry bit, one of his "Donald Trefusis, ageing professor of Philology" numbers. See Fry's book Paperweight.

P.S., I'm a huge fan of Fry, surely Britain's most amazing comic genius of the past 50 years.


Sacred cows make the best hamburger. - Clemens
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793006 02/14/04 03:19 PM
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jgoo Offline
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Here's my favriote word!

Taken directly from Russell Ash's "The Top Ten of Everything 2002" page 101: the number one longest word in the english language:

Ornicopytheobiblopsychocrystarroscioaerogenethliometeoroaustrohieroanthropoicichthy-opyrosiderochpnomyoalectryoophiobotanopegohydrorhabdocrithoaleuroalphitohalomoly-bdoclerobeloaxi nocoscinodactyliogeolithopes-sopscphocatoptrotephraoeirochiroomychodactyloarithsti-chooxogeloscogastrogyrocerobletonooenoscapulinaniac

(Now try saying that 10 times fast!!! eek laugh laugh )

This word means: A deluded human who practices divination or forecasting by means of phenomena, interpretation of acts, or other manifestations related to the following animate or inamiate objects and appearances: birds, oracles, Bible, ghosts, crystal gazing, shadows, air appearances, birth stars, meteors, winds, sacrificial appearances, entrails of humans and fishes, fire, red-hot irons, altar smoke, mice, grain picking by rooster, snakes, herbs, fountains, water, wands, dough, meal, barley, salt, lead, dice, arrows, hatchet balance, sieve, ring suspension, random dots, precious stones, pebbles, pebble heaps, mirrors, ash writting, dreams, palmistry, nail rays, finger rings, numbers, book passages, name letterings, laughing, manners, ventriloquism, circle walking, wax, susceptibility to hidden springs, wine, and shoulder blades.


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Re: An obscure, favorite word #793007 02/14/04 03:42 PM
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plays88skeys Offline OP
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Matt - Busted! You are too good.

Ariel - I really like "fungible."

Jgoo - LOL!

Another one I like is "schmeck" -- as in 'This particular piece of music really schmecks!" Basically, it means to react or respond in a favorable manner. My dearest friend used to say this all the time -- I was never sure if she made it up or if it was a real word, but I've always liked it.

Another person I know made up the word "hizzer." I don't particularly like it, but he was always promoting it and tried to get it included in Webster's. He says it's his way of being gender neutral, as in "his or her." Whatever... :rolleyes:


There are no shortcuts to any place worth going. - Beverly Sills
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793008 02/14/04 04:17 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by zorro:
Fragilisticsuperalafragistic or something like that, I can't remember...
zorro
It just rolls off your tongue, doesn't it?
If you were trying to write: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, then you are right, it does roll right off the tounge. Although it was an invented word and made popular in the movie Marry Poppins, it is now considered as an eligable word since it has appeared in the Oxford Dictionary. It means "wonderful", and is tied in 8th place as the longest word in the English language, along with: Pseudoantidisestablishmentarianism, meaning "false opposition to the withdrawal of state support from a church", and is derived from the word: Antidisestablishmentarianism, wich doesn't make it in the top ten list of longest words in the English Language. (The 10th spot is taken by three words, each 30 letters in length. Antidisestablishmentarianism is only 28 letters long. The one that I posted above is a whopping 310 letters long!!! eek ).


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793009 02/14/04 06:38 PM
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jazzyd Offline
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Say it loud, say it proud...

Pronk

(v : jump straight up, as of kangaroos)


David


"After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music." - Aldous Huxley
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793010 02/14/04 06:58 PM
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Matt G. Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by plays88keys:
Another one I like is "schmeck" -- as in 'This particular piece of music really schmecks!" Basically, it means to react or respond in a favorable manner. My dearest friend used to say this all the time -- I was never sure if she made it up or if it was a real word, but I've always liked it.
Schmeck is likely from either German or Yiddish schmecken, whose literal meaning is "to taste." Maybe your friend is trying to say that it's "tasty"!


Sacred cows make the best hamburger. - Clemens
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793011 02/14/04 07:25 PM
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I've studied both modern and ancient Greek. I always liked callipygian which so lovingly describes an attribute many females bewail.


accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793012 02/14/04 08:26 PM
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Matt G. Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by apple:
I always liked callipygian
Callipygian good! Πυγη!

Just testing my unicode. smile


Sacred cows make the best hamburger. - Clemens
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793013 02/14/04 09:26 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by Matt G.:
P.S., I'm a huge fan of Fry, surely Britain's most amazing comic genius of the past 50 years.
Yes, but even genii have the moments of madness. I found The Stars' Tennis Balls very disappointing compared to his other three novels; not because it was poorly written, but because the others were so very good.

David


"After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music." - Aldous Huxley
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793014 02/14/04 11:06 PM
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David Burton Offline
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"Ah, that dress (a short jersey back cut down to the two dimples on either side of her coccyx) makes you look so callipygous tonight."

I don't know, can't think of anyone who might like hearing that or getting it even.

Re: An obscure, favorite word #793015 02/15/04 12:44 AM
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Palindrome Offline
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(I can't believe I've found something Matt didn't know!)*

It's not "Urgic," but rather, "Ugric." It's one of the two languages naming the Finno-Ugric language group, which includes Turkish and Mongolian, in addition to Finnish. My OED (1/e) gives Ugrian as preferred, however. My favorite word is "Dinner!" shouted, as an invitation.

*Which reminds me of a story. When Jack Benny was young (so this story goes), he was practicing the violin, to the accompaniment of the family dog, which was howling. After a while, this got on Jack's father's nerves, and the old man shouted downstairs, "For heaven's sake, Jack, can't you play something the dog doesn't know?"

I worked for a Greek pathologist once, who insisted his residents be familiar with two words, "callipygous" and "steatopygous" (steato = fat). And while my mind is wandering, I remember an interesting story he told me about medical malpractice in Greece. He had once made a mistake, misdiagnosing a vein as a vas deferens (meaning that one of his patients was unaware that his vasectomy had not been successful). The man's wife became pregnant, as a result of this error. The pathologist was not sued, however. The pathologist was aware that the man's mistress had also become pregnant, and threatened to expose that in court if he were sued. As the patient's wife had no knowledge of the existence of the patient's mistress, and the patient wanted it kept that way, no suit was filed.


There is no end of learning. -Robert Schumann Rules for Young Musicians
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793016 02/15/04 05:56 AM
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Why of why of all the threads, is this neat one the victim of the dreaded side-winder disease?

I can't stand it. It's like having a real papyrus to unravel. I've got some (I think) cool words. But not yet. I'll wait until there's an antidote.

One observation. Hey, apple...Which do you think are more callipygian - apples or peaches? (Guess it depends on how tight the gluts are).

Ariel

VERY terrific word! So zaftig - that word TomAsterisk didn't want anybody defining for you. Means "juicy" literally in German and Yiddish. Metaphorically - well, kind of like Elizabeth Taylor in between her first (horse )movie and Virginai Wolf.


If this is coffee, bring me tea. If this is tea, bring me coffee.
~Abraham Lincoln~
Re: An obscure, favorite word #793017 02/15/04 07:29 AM
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ChickGrand Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by Ariel:
Why of why of all the threads, is this neat one the victim of the dreaded side-winder disease?

I can't stand it. It's like having a real papyrus to unravel. I've got some (I think) cool words. But not yet. I'll wait until there's an antidote.
The thing that caused it in this particular thread is jgoo's long word. If he'd hyphenated it so that it fit on about 3 or 4 lines, we wouldn't be scrolling. Any such long continuous object, whether it's a photo, a URL, or a very long unbreakable bit of text, causes this scrolling. It's not an error of the new UBB software. (Though some of the other threads are currently deranged because of some error in handling URL's for sig pictures and such.) That's why it's always a good idea to scale pictures to about 640 pixels wide or less, and to use short URL's rather than post the whole long one as a link.

Re: An obscure, favorite word #793018 02/15/04 10:30 AM
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Bob Muir Offline
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Hey jgoo, how 'bout editing your post?

It's easy to enter diacritical characters like umlauts once you know how. In Windows, bring up the Character Map, (WinXP = Start->All Programs->Accessories->System Tools->Character Map), find your specific character, copy to the clipboard or note the Alt number.

For example, the small 'u' with umlaut/diaeresis is Alt-0252. ü Hold down the <ALT> key while you type 0252. Make sure you use the number pad when typing the numbers. Capital 'U' with umlaut would be Alt-0220.

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