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Re: Practice suggestions for Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 1 #578604
01/12/08 11:14 AM
01/12/08 11:14 AM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
London, UK (though if it's Aug...
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keyboardklutz  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 10,856
London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Quote
Originally posted by Alexander Hanysz:
Quote
Originally posted by JerryS88:
[b] You might want to check out concert pianist Alan Kogosowski\'s book about the Chopin Etudes which includes not only a fascinating biography of Chopin with particular focus on the etudes, but also thorough instructions on how to master each of them. According to him, this first etude is all about NOT stretching the hand, but rather DISPLACING it...
And he seems to think that Beethoven's music never requires a span of more than a sixth--I'm not making that up, he does emphasise the word "never". There's a few counterexamples out there, including a little ditty by the name of "Waldstein"... [/b]
He wants to try op 90 bars 55-65! That's damaged plenty of left hands.


snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
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Re: Practice suggestions for Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 1 #578605
01/12/08 03:49 PM
01/12/08 03:49 PM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 360
Rochester, NY
op30no3 Offline
Full Member
op30no3  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 360
Rochester, NY
Quote
Originally posted by JerryS88:
You might want to check out concert pianist Alan Kogosowski\'s book about the Chopin Etudes which includes not only a fascinating biography of Chopin with particular focus on the etudes, but also thorough instructions on how to master each of them. According to him, this first etude is all about NOT stretching the hand, but rather DISPLACING it. I cannot vouch for the effectiveness or validity of this, as I have never learned this particular etude, but he does offer very interesting and unique ideas.

Well, I have played this piece and can play it at the marked tempo, so I feel fairly qualified in HIGHLY recommending Kogosowski's book. It was a real eye-opener, especially on this first etude. I don't agree with him on everything, but that is inevitable. Take what you will from the book, but it is valuable from a biographical point of view and the pedagogic side, though, as someone else said, you do have to sift through a lot to get to the technical advice.

Anyway, DO NOT STRETCH during this etude! Stretching the hand hardens all the muscles in the hand, and your hand must be relaxes through the whole piece. For me, the "trick" is to have the wrist line up with whatever finger is playing at that moment. Aside from the interval between whatever notes you are playing, the hand should be relaxed and in a nice, closed, unstretched position. For instance, as you play the first four notes, after you play the first C, your thumb comes back in and follows the hand up the keyboard until it plays the next C.

I have no idea if any of this makes any sense.


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Re: Practice suggestions for Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 1 #578606
01/12/08 06:42 PM
01/12/08 06:42 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 143
Adelaide, South Australia
A
Alexander Hanysz Offline
Full Member
Alexander Hanysz  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 143
Adelaide, South Australia
Quote
Originally posted by op30no3:
...Anyway, DO NOT STRETCH during this etude!...Aside from the interval between whatever notes you are playing, the hand should be relaxed and in a nice, closed, unstretched position...I have no idea if any of this makes any sense.
The message I'm getting is that "do not stretch" can't be taken too literally. To get from one note to the next, it's necessary to stretch part of the hand for a short time. The important thing is "do not stretch unnecessarily"--it needs to be kept to a minimum, and it's important to relax again as soon as possible.

Have I understood you correctly?

Re: Practice suggestions for Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 1 #578607
01/12/08 08:49 PM
01/12/08 08:49 PM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 360
Rochester, NY
op30no3 Offline
Full Member
op30no3  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 360
Rochester, NY
I think that the "do not stretch" must be taken literally, though it can't be taken literally... wink As you say, you have to stretch to some degree to get from any note to another if they are not a second apart. The difference about which I am talking is the difference between taking your first and second fingers and hitting a fourth(not a stretch) and hitting an octave (a stretch). The primary difference, to me, between the two is the effect that each has on the hand: the latter causes the hand to become hard and inflexible, the former doesn't (I'm assuming that Matt's hand can reach at least a fourth or so with 1-2).

Another stretching danger is of trying to play this etude by putting the hand in a position of the arpeggios as block chords (which should never be done with arpeggios).

Always remember Chopin's "souplesse!"


Help people. www.thehungersite.com
Go and click the button. That's it. Just do it.
Re: Practice suggestions for Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 1 #578608
01/12/08 10:42 PM
01/12/08 10:42 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,288
L
LiszThalberg Offline OP
3000 Post Club Member
LiszThalberg  Offline OP
3000 Post Club Member
L

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,288
Quote
Originally posted by op30no3:
(I'm assuming that Matt's hand can reach at least a fourth or so with 1-2).
Assume away... laugh

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