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Familar Chord Progressions used by Chopin, Scirabin, Rachmaninov etc.. #567076
05/31/06 09:44 AM
05/31/06 09:44 AM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 55
London
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newton2060 Offline OP
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newton2060  Offline OP
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Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 55
London
Hi,

I was just wondering if anybody knew of the main chord progressions used by composers like Chopin , Scriabin, and Rachmaninov etc..(romantic/late romantic era).

I know in jazz, the main progressions are II-V-I, Rhythm changes, Coltrane changes and the blues/extended blues.

Does anybody know of the chord progressions used by Chopin and his followers? I guess II-V-I is common in all music.

Also, how would you differentiate the voicings used by different composers? Are you be able categorize them?

I am trying to map out a model for improvising in all keys classical/romantic stuff.

Please advise,

Many thanks in advance,

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Re: Familar Chord Progressions used by Chopin, Scirabin, Rachmaninov etc.. #567077
05/31/06 03:24 PM
05/31/06 03:24 PM
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 13,837
Iowa City, IA
Kreisler Offline
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Kreisler  Offline
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Yes, the familiar ii-V-I is important.

But classical music isn't really based on set progressions, more like set tendencies.

Classical music makes much more extensive use of inversions and counterpoint than jazz and pop music, so many of the sounds are a result of this voice leading than of the use of a particular voicing.


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Re: Familar Chord Progressions used by Chopin, Scirabin, Rachmaninov etc.. #567078
05/31/06 05:07 PM
05/31/06 05:07 PM
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Posts: 631
UK
jpw101 Offline
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Probably insignificant, but I noticed that Chopin modulates from the tonic to the supertonic a great deal in his melodies, sometimes simply repeating the melody at that transposition, e.g. Polonaises Op. 22, 53, and 61, Etude Op. 10/11 etc.

Re: Familar Chord Progressions used by Chopin, Scirabin, Rachmaninov etc.. #567079
05/31/06 10:33 PM
05/31/06 10:33 PM
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Posts: 70
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Kelana Offline
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You'll find the earlier classical music (e.g. Handel, Haydn, some of Bach and Mozart) easier to analyse in terms of straight chord progression. While Chopin / Rach etc. do have beautiful sections of music based on traditional progressions, much of their music is very difficult to analyse this way.

Take, for example Chopin's famous C# minor waltz. The effect in the first section is so unique and dramatic because of the modulation from major to minor, dominant to tonic almost every other bar. The second 'cascading' section is based on a traditional progression and is lyrical and beautiful. A quick modulation into the major key with some slight chromatic harmonies for the bridge, before returning to the main two themes.

Many sections of their music are even more difficult to analyse because it relies on chromatic progressions rather than chord patterns. The chromatic lines do create alternating dissonance and harmony, and are woven together with a huge amount of skill to create their distinctive styles. Although these could be analysed as chords, because the chord often changes every semiquaver, I don't find this analysis helpful. Instead, I look at where the lines intersect to create the dominant (or alternate) tonality.

Interestingly enough, some of the 'classical' influenced jazz composers used similar progressions, developed into a chordal framework for jazz pieces. Gershwin and Duke Ellington are great examples of these types of music, and great influences for finding alternatives to the traditional ii, V, I patterns.


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Re: Familar Chord Progressions used by Chopin, Scirabin, Rachmaninov etc.. #567080
06/01/06 02:43 AM
06/01/06 02:43 AM
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Posts: 2,846
RHUL
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Max W Offline
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Max W  Offline
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RHUL
Rachmaninoff uses a lot of chromatic modulations, like Cmaj-C#maj-Cmaj. I think it's close to a I-iv-I, except with the added minor 6th on the iv chord.


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