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repertoire #531462
05/03/07 07:46 PM
05/03/07 07:46 PM
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 122
Missouri
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py-anno Offline OP
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Missouri
well, my piano year is almost over. on the 19 of may to be exact. then i get to start on my repertoir for the next piano year. i have some ideas for what i would like to do, but there are other places where im just not sure what to play.
these are the pieces im sure of:

1. handel suite no. 4 1st mov. allegro
2. hut of baba yaga and great gate of kiev from pictures at an exhibition
3.rach sonata no. 2 2nd movement

and some other ideas are:

1. mozart sonata k332 mov. 1 (i just finished the second mov. this year)
2. chopin butterfly etude.
3. khatchaturian toccata
4. a movement of a prokofiev sonata(not sure which, i was thinkin maybe the 3rd mov. of the fifth. how hard would you rank that?)
5. stravinsky etude no 1 or 4

so, i need a total of 7 pieces for the year. that means i need to find 4 more. i need a piece from each of the major eras (baroque, classical, romantic, contemporary) and basically three of my choice. im not so hot on baroque, classical, or early romantic. my heart lies within in the contemporary era. I also love to find pieces that people dont always hear (such as in the past, i have played the resphigi nocturne, biscardi incitation to desire, liebermann gargoyles, among others.)

with that said, do you have any ideas of pieces that might be good for me. if you dont have ideas, which of my ideas do you think sound good?

in case your wondering, yes, i am capable of playing these pieces with great technical skill and wonderful musicality smile .

all input will be much appreciated. thank you!

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Re: repertoire #531463
05/04/07 05:10 AM
05/04/07 05:10 AM
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Witold Offline
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I don't think you should choose your repertoire based on what you know, rather on what you don't know. Seeing that you have played pieces like Allegro Barbaro, what is the educational value of playing Khatchaturian's toccata? You should ask yourself what you will learn from that particular piece. Yes, it sounds nice and very impressive to the occassional listener, but it is in fact very easy and would probably not expand your expressional vocabulary very much. Instead, think of what music and textures you aren't familiar with. If you normally run away in horror as soon as someone mentions polyrhythms like 5:3 or 5:4, then go for Skryabin's etude op8 nr4. If chromatic textures beyond Rachmaninov and Prokofiev give you problems, then learn some music by Szymanowski. You seem to have focused very much on fast and percussive music, how about trying the opposite, Debussy perhaps? Some calm prelude of his could probably be very useful.

Re: repertoire #531464
05/04/07 07:27 AM
05/04/07 07:27 AM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 264
Uppsala, Sweden
troglodyte Offline
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Quote
4. a movement of a prokofiev sonata(not sure which, i was thinkin maybe the 3rd mov. of the fifth. how hard would you rank that?)
Not terribly hard. The main technical difficulty is a sequence of dissonant chords in RH just before the end, check it out and see if your hands can accommodate all the notes. And the ending (piu mosso) I guess can be played very fast if you want, but I think it needn't be. But I would suggest the first movement of that sonata as a bit more musically interesting and a bit less hard.

Re: repertoire #531465
05/04/07 09:29 AM
05/04/07 09:29 AM
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Victoria, BC
BruceD Offline
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Do you know the function of the "Shift" key?


BruceD
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Estonia 190
Re: repertoire #531466
05/04/07 04:55 PM
05/04/07 04:55 PM
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Posts: 122
Missouri
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py-anno Offline OP
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Missouri
Well first of all, thanks for the replies!

Witold:
I thought I clearly stated in my first post that I love to find music that I and no one else has heard that much of. That said, your first sentence totally contradicts itself. The purpose for all of these pieces that I have mentioned is that they mean something to me on a deeper level more than just a superficial "impressiveness". Also, I think there is hardly any musical texture I am not familiar with. I may be wrong, and if you think I am, then please tell me where I am lacking.
Polyrhythms usually give me no trouble, and if they do, I can usually get them worked out.
Let's see, fast and percussive encompasses:

Tcherepnin bagatelle
Allegro Barbaro
Chopin etude
parts of the kabalevsky
Khatchaturian toccata
Stravinsky etudes
Mussourgsky selections

the opposite:

Handel courante I am currently working on
Mozart sonata k332 mov. 2 (I am working on)
Macdowell improvisation (currently working on)
rach sonata mov. 2
Biscardi incitation to desire
Chopin butterfly etude
Liebermann gargoyles

There you go, they are equal.
I thank you for your time and ideas, however, I disagree.

Troglodyte:
Thank you for your input.
I am not sure the difficulty of really any of the sonatas, and am not familiar with most of them either. How would you rank them? Which are your favorites? What about the second movement of the 7th sonata? It is extremely beautiful, but in the middle of the pieces I see all of these big arppeggios and such. Where would this piece be ranked among others?
As for those chords at the end of the 3rd mov. of the 5th sonata, you are right, they are of some trouble. I'm pretty sure they could be worked out, seeing as how I have fairly large hands.

BruceD:
Ahh, thank you for awaring me of such atrosities, I'm very sorry that they were a displeasure to you. I hope you will find that I tried very hard in this post to use the "shift key". Now, do you have any ideas about my question in my first post, or did you just reply for the purpose of correcting me?

Re: repertoire #531467
05/04/07 05:20 PM
05/04/07 05:20 PM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,607
Manchester, UK
debrucey Offline
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You organise you repotoire by year? I have nowhere near enough decisiveness or willpower to do that. I organise mine by month, and I generally learn 3 or 4 pieces, and forget 1 of my last months ones. :p

Re: repertoire #531468
05/04/07 07:06 PM
05/04/07 07:06 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,618
Geneva, Switzerland
PoStTeNeBrAsLuX Offline
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py-anno:
What about the second movement of the 7th sonata? It is extremely beautiful,

As is the middle movement of the 8th. Lyrical yet bitter-sweet, with some great stringent harmonies and highly effective counterpoint too. For some reason, it reminds me of Mahler... perhaps the upward sweep/leap to the tonic in the second bar/measure of the main theme.

-Michael B.


There are two rules to success in life: Rule #1. Don't tell people everything you know.
Re: repertoire #531469
05/04/07 10:36 PM
05/04/07 10:36 PM
Joined: May 2001
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Victoria, BC
BruceD Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by py-anno:
BruceD:
Ahh, thank you for awaring me of such atrosities, I'm very sorry that they were a displeasure to you. I hope you will find that I tried very hard in this post to use the "shift key". Now, do you have any ideas about my question in my first post, or did you just reply for the purpose of correcting me?
I don't recall mentioning anything about atrocities nor did I say that anything you wrote incurred any displeasure. I was wondering, perhaps, if you were a new-age e e cummings in prose.

Yes, I have some suggestions, which I'll offer against my better judgment, since most of them are more main-stream than what you say you prefer.

Baroque :
Bach is always good for ones technique as well as for mental discipline. Among the 48 Preludes and Fugues there are many, particularly those in Book II that are practically never played, while there are several from Book I that one almost always hears. So, you could start with a couple of the lesser known Bach Preludes and Fugues. I don't think the English Suites and the French Suites are "overdone" either.
Handel : Suites

18th century :
Any number of Haydn Sonatas; many of them are not often played, and deserve to be heard more often.
Soler : Keyboard Sonatas - 120 of them! (much in the style of Scarlatti)

19th century:
John Field : Nocturnes
Hummel : Sonatas (He wrote 6, I believe.)

20th century:
Moszkowski : Spanish Dances, Op 12
Samuel Barber : Excursions, Sonata
Rachmaninoff : Transcriptions (some of them are wonderful models of the genre and beautifully pianistic, though very difficult)
Ginastera
Messaien : 20 Regards sur l'Enfant Jesus
Scriabin : Preludes, Op 11

I wish I could be more inventive, but I'm pretty much middle-of-the road in my repertoire preferences.

Regards,


BruceD
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Estonia 190
Re: repertoire #531470
05/05/07 05:11 AM
05/05/07 05:11 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,703
NY-Madrid-Newfoundland (rhymes...
EHpianist Offline
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Oh oh!! I second Bruce D's Ginastera! What about the Sonata? Such a fantastic piece.

Other suggestions:

Erwin Schulhoff: 5 Etudes de Jazz or any of his Jazz Suites.

I don't see any French music on your lists (perhaps I overlooked it?). How about Ravel's Sonatine, Jeux d'eau or the Tombeau de Couperin (my favorite and definitely underplayed!) or from Debussy a group of Preludes, an Etude, a book of a piece from Images or Estampes? I think any of these would round out your repertoire nicely.

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com


Schnabel's advie to Horowitz: "When a piece gets difficult, make faces."
Re: repertoire #531471
05/05/07 07:57 AM
05/05/07 07:57 AM
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 191
NY
thepianist2008 Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by EHpianist:
from Debussy ... a piece from Images ... I think any of these would round out your repertoire nicely.

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com
I didn't see it here, so I'd like to reccomend Debussy's Reflets Dans L'Eau from Images book I. I just did it for a Level Six high school NYSSMA solo (100, yay!), so it won't cause you too much strain, but it's a gorgeous piece to play. Yes, people love to hear the impressive pieces when you go out and play, and if you let them look at your hands, this piece will be impressive. But it's also very relaxing, with gentle, rippling rhythms. You can also get it for free, which is a bonus. It's available at www.sheetmusicarchive.net/ Everything there is public domain, so even if you don't like that one, I'm sure you'll find something.


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Prokofieff Visions Fugitives Op. 22

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Re: repertoire #531472
05/05/07 08:39 AM
05/05/07 08:39 AM
Joined: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,703
NY-Madrid-Newfoundland (rhymes...
EHpianist Offline
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Or how about some Spanish...Albéniz? Granados?

Contemporary: Sofia Gubaidulina? Ligeti? (his slower etudes are more accessible than the others, also No.8, Fem, and No. 5 Fanfares [or is it 4? can't remember]are easier than the rest, though "easy" is a relative term in this case)

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com


Schnabel's advie to Horowitz: "When a piece gets difficult, make faces."
Re: repertoire #531473
05/05/07 07:38 PM
05/05/07 07:38 PM
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 122
Missouri
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py-anno Offline OP
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Missouri
Ahh, I think this is the most replies I have ever recieved!!

BruceSan:
Yes, yes I do! Well, what we do is, in about june we try to get a basic gist of my repertoire for the year. Then at the end of the year, we have this thing called guild. It is basically where you go and play for a judge and sort of get judged on how your doing. It's not a competition or anything, more for umm knowing where you are, I guess. I really like the way I do it. Seems easier. All of these pieces are used throughout the year for competitions, recitals, and such.

PoStTeNeBrAsLuX:

I played through the second movement of the 8th. It was not my favorite, I love the melody at the beginning, however, when it changes into the "b" secion, it looses my attention. However, thank you for the suggestion, it may still grow on me.

BruceD:
I'm sorry, I was not in the greatest mood that day, and the way your post was written just made it sound kind of emm "snoody" and maddened me. Please don't take it offensively, I'm sure your aware how hard it is to decipher how something is being sad on the internet.

What exactly do you mean by new age e e cummings in prose? As in a scam or virus or such?

I've never been very big on bach, he just has never appealed to me that much. However, recently I've been obsessed with Handel, so I may yet have a liking for Bach. You are right though, the Handel suites are way underplayed, the 4th in e minor is so beautiful.

I have never heard of Soler, it somewhat rings a bell, but it also reminds of of a brand of bathroom appliance. Haydn has just about gotten on my last nerve, there is just something about him that seems unreal, superficial you may so. No one can be that happy all the time...

I have played around with maybe one or two of the Field Nocturnes. They are nice, but not my favorite, are there any in particular that you are especially fond of?

I think I've heard the Spanish Dances before, and something is telling me i didnt like them...I am familiar with the first excursion, but not the other four(?). I wish I could play the Barber Sonata, especially the 4th movement, but I'm thinkin its a bit much for now. I'm only familiar with Ginastera's Argentinian Dances(I think thats the title??) and I love them, I've heard many great things about Ginastera, so I will probably look into that. I love the messiaen regards, well most of them. Especially number 7 I think it is, not so sure, it may be number 6...I have played no Scriabin and I'm starting to regret it, I hear so many great things about him. Thank you for you post!

EhPianist:
(I'm going to combine both of your posts into one)
Erwin Schulhoff, I have never heard of him. Is he anything like Kapustin, becuase I have a liking for Kapustin. You are right, I don't have any french music on my list. Ravel is one of my favorite composers, Debussy, not so much, but he still has a lot of great music. I was thinking about doing the third movement of the sonatine. I think the Jeax D'eau is still a little above me. I played the Rigaudon from Le Tombeau this past year, its a great piece. I especially love the toccata!
I've looked through the first book of preludes and didn't find much of anything. I have yet to look at the second book. I have never heard any of the etudes, I can't find them anywhere either. I love the Pagodes from Estampes, and was thinkin about playing the Gardens in the Rain this year. I love Images II the best, especially "Moon Over the Temple". It is soo beautiful.

Sofia Gubaidulina, there was recently a post on her, and I went and checked her out and was not interested at all. I like Ligeti, or most of it anyway, some of the etudes are umm not good to my ears. I like his harder ones...but I have not heard all of them, so I will look into Fem and Fanfares.

thepianist2008:

Ahh, Reflets Dans L'eau. I love that piece, and recently asked my teacher about it, she however said that it was probably a little above me right now. But that is an excellent suggestion!

Thank you all!

Re: repertoire #531474
05/05/07 09:12 PM
05/05/07 09:12 PM
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Posts: 122
Missouri
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py-anno Offline OP
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EhPianist, which of Ginasteras sonatas are you talking bout. There are three of them.

Re: repertoire #531475
05/05/07 11:24 PM
05/05/07 11:24 PM
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Victoria, BC
BruceD Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by py-anno:
BruceD:
I'm sorry, I was not in the greatest mood that day, and the way your post was written just made it sound kind of emm "snoody" and maddened me. Please don't take it offensively, I'm sure your aware how hard it is to decipher how something is being sad on the internet.

What exactly do you mean by new age e e cummings in prose? As in a scam or virus or such?

e e cummings, American poet, 1894-1962, who often wrote poems without capitalization and without punctuation. It was, apparently, one of his editors who wrote his name as e e cummings (without capitals, and without periods) although Cummings himself, in spite of how he wrote much of his poetry, did not approve of his name being written that way.

Regards,


BruceD
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Estonia 190
Re: repertoire #531476
05/06/07 03:42 AM
05/06/07 03:42 AM
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Posts: 1,703
NY-Madrid-Newfoundland (rhymes...
EHpianist Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by py-anno:
EhPianist, which of Ginasteras sonatas are you talking bout. There are three of them.
No. 1. Funny, I thought that was the only one he wrote as it is the only one I ever hear anyone playing (thanks for pointing out it is not)! I have to listen to the other two, are they as wonderful as No.1? Laura played it for her Master's recital in Dublin, and I fell in love with the piece.

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com


Schnabel's advie to Horowitz: "When a piece gets difficult, make faces."
Re: repertoire #531477
05/06/07 04:41 AM
05/06/07 04:41 AM
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Posts: 1,703
NY-Madrid-Newfoundland (rhymes...
EHpianist Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by py-anno:
EhPianist:
(I'm going to combine both of your posts into one)
Erwin Schulhoff, I have never heard of him.
I didn't know Kapustin at all, just heard a unch of his works on Youtube (along with an impromptu he plays himself), great stuff! And he has pieces for piano duo!!!

The idea of jazz-inspired classical pieces behind Schulhoff and Kapustin seems to be the same though Schulhoff is one generation earlier so the type of "jazz" used is older, mostly dance rhythms.

Read about Schulhoff here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Schulhoff

Listen to his Jazz inspired works here (the 5 Etudes de Jazz begin on track 11)

http://www.amazon.com/Schulhoff-Pia...TF8&qid=1178440268&sr=1-9#disc_1

Too bad, I don't see the "Tempo di Fox a la Hawaii" here, which is hilarious. I have a CD of these works by Tamas Vasary which I think has one more suite which is not on this CD, though he plays them much less jazzy and more 'straight', which did not appeal to me.

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com


Schnabel's advie to Horowitz: "When a piece gets difficult, make faces."

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