2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
36 members (drumour, cygnusdei, Ben_NZ, Boboulus, clothearednincompo, David Boyce, bkem101, chopin_r_us, brennbaer, dhts, 6 invisible), 1,014 guests, and 748 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
#470877 05/31/06 11:59 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 233
D
DaWF Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 233
I've noticed, as my school work is getting harder, I'm forced to make the decision of whether to practice or to finish my Chemistry more and more. This frustrates me to no end, as I essentially loathe all my classes, do not give a monkey's tush about academics, and really would rather just play all day long.
Now, realistically I know that's not going to happen and that if I want to pursue music into college I need decent grades, but if I'm not at the top of my game musically, I won't get into the college music program I want anyway. It's a nasty cylce, and I'm not sure how to fix it.
Has anyone else experienced this problem and could offer a decent solution? Thanks


On a side note, I just performed the Cat and the Mouse by Copland at a small piano recital. I would said it was my 2nd best performance ever! (next to when I played MacDowell's Hunagarian Etude at a band concert) Good performance's are exhilerating!

#470878 06/01/06 12:27 AM
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 156
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 156
It's definitely tough to keep up with your studies and piano at the same time. Although I still may only be a junior in high school, the time is still not there.

In fact, I practiced Wedding Day at Troldhaugen for an hour just now when I need to finish the school's literature magazine tonight, finish annotating Their Eyes Were Watching God for English, memorize a script for a presentation in English, research Enron for marketing, and study for SAT II's (which is this Saturday). I just use piano to relieve stress because I would have a nervous breakdown if it wasn't for the Grieg!

#470879 06/01/06 12:48 AM
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 183
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 183
Haha wow, welcome to the story of my life. When I get new repertoire I need to learn it as fast as possible, so during the year when things get busy with classes, I can afford to drop a couple of days of practice.


“The first question I ask myself when something doesn't seem to be beautiful is why do I think it's not beautiful? And very shortly you discover that there is no reason.”
-John Cage
#470880 06/01/06 01:07 AM
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 497
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 497
My work load is picking up for finals and I'm practicing only for an hour :..(


So, you're a cannibal.
#470881 06/01/06 01:19 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,450
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,450
Right now, for some of you, it may be academic commitments; later in life, it will be other responsibilities, but one of the hardest lessons in life is learning to accept the fact that one can't always do what one would like to do when one wants to do it. Another difficult task is setting priorities and having the guts to put things that must be done ahead of those things that one wants to do. Then comes the difficulty of sticking to those priorities when more attractive alternatives are available.

In the final analysis, however, there is greater, longer-lasting satisfaction in knowing that you are tough enough to stick to your commitments and that you can prove your reliability to those who count on you than there is in enjoying the pleasures of the moment.

We all need time to momentarily break away from the responsibilities that are heaped upon us; we need time to do the things we like to do, but sometimes life doesn't let us fulfill those needs.

"To everything there is a season ...."

Hang in there! Summer will soon be here.


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
#470882 06/01/06 01:26 AM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 433
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 433
I like what Bruce D said.
I also remember that when I was in high school, I often got very good work done on my music while I was very busy with class. Sometimes I would have to work extra hard to cram in just an hour of practicing, but it often ended up being the most productive practicing. For one thing, I knew time was of the essence, so I made sure not to waste it. Also, I was relieved to be practicing instead of studying, so I could enjoy it and focus that much more.

#470883 06/01/06 01:31 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,450
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,450
Shosti :

Yours are wise observations!

There is an old saw that says : "If you want something done give it to the busiest person you know." The busy person knows how to prioritize tasks and uses his time efficiently when performing them. Shosti, your example illustrates this.

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
#470884 06/01/06 01:43 AM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 70
K
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
K
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 70
Finding time just gets harder and harder from here on in... Once you start work, an employer has demands on your time, and if you get married (or have a long term partner) they often require your attention to be directed towards them rather than the keyboard (strange, but there you are). I don't have kids yet, but I'm sure it's exponentially harder still for those that do.


Ever imagined a world without hypothetical situations?
#470885 06/01/06 03:00 AM
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 26
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 26
yes, you have to learn to fit piano practice into your schedule full of other responsibilities and obligations.

I remember reading an article somewhere...clavier or international piano magazine...about how most pianists in conservatories balk at the idea of doing anything besides practicing all the time...when in fact every one of them, except for those lucky enough to sustain a performance/recording career, will have to do something else, that likely being teaching in some capacity. And I know most music professors certainly don't get to spend all their time learning and polishing new music.

So it never ends...even if you do pursue a career in piano and succeed, you'll still have to learn to manage your time and juggle your new responsibilities.

-Max

#470886 06/01/06 05:45 AM
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 2,846
M
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 2,846
I agree with what's been said with prioritising - practising piano can wait, and I wouldn't really miss a day of practise at this time of the year. However studying for exams won't wait and I need to study as much as possible. You appreciate something more if you have less of it.

#470887 06/01/06 06:01 AM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 754
J
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 754
You might try allowing yourself piano practise time as a reward for doing your studies...

I gave up piano playing for many years due to having little children round the house - just made it too difficult. But they're growing up now and I've been able to get back into a more normal practice routine and performances quite easily.


John
#470888 06/01/06 07:08 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 233
D
DaWF Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
D
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 233
Yes, but I've been told by most adults to "suck it up" (Just worded differently) and I don't know if it's just that they do not enjoy music as much as I do, enjoy academics more, or what.
I'm referring to my percussion studies when I write this, but it can be applied to any instrument very easily so I posted it here too.
The thing with school is I find it incredibly difficult to care and concentrate about/on any of what I'm learning because I am sure I will not use it for anything past highschool. It's like all of highschool is just geared for getting you into college, not following your interests. I'm never going to apply stoiciometry to timpani performance
I often find so why bother? Bad attitude? I've been told many times. I don't know what to do about it though.

#470889 06/03/06 12:50 AM
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 26
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 26
Quote
Originally posted by DaWF:

The thing with school is I find it incredibly difficult to care and concentrate about/on any of what I'm learning because I am sure I will not use it for anything past highschool. It's like all of highschool is just geared for getting you into college, not following your interests. I'm never going to apply stoiciometry to timpani performance
I often find so why bother? Bad attitude? I've been told many times. I don't know what to do about it though.
Mostly true, and I won't attempt to argue with your belief in the pointlessness of stoichiometry. But being a good and diligent student prepares you for life and the many things you will deal with as a timpani performance major, a college student, and a person. I dont mean to over-emphasize this issue...lol, getting a good grade on one test in high school won't change your life dramatically or anything, but in a sense, I would say your attitude ought to be adjusted. That's in theory.

As for what you should do to deal with this?

I don't know. If you're sure percussion is what you want to do with your life, then make it the top priority immediately. But at the same time, school should be high on that list as well.

Good luck.

-Max

#470890 06/03/06 04:01 AM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,699
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,699
Hi,

Having just graduated from high school and now in my first year at a conservatory, I can sympathize with you.

In my opinion your statement : "if I want to pursue music into college I need decent grades, but if I'm not at the top of my game musically, I won't get into the college music program I want anyway", isn't actually true.

You have to prioritize things: If you really want to get into a top music program, be a piano performance major, and study with a renowned piano teacher, then chemistry shouldn't even be something you should have to worry about. You should be taking the easiest classes to get by - classes that will still leave you with a broad understanding of the world and a decent education but don't cause burdens that severly affect your practicing schedule.

On the other hand, if you don't want to be a professional musician, if you want to do someting else with your life, then you should be worrying about taking the hardest classes and getting good grades, thus you shouldn't be that concerned if your playing is not on a top notch level.

..My point is that you're gonna have to choose between piano or academics - it's pointless to try to be excellent in both.
I know that I certainly am not a person who could have done as well in academics as I did in piano, because I made a choice early on that I would study what I had to learn to become an educated, well-rounded human being and to pass my requirements, but little enough so that I would have ample time to practice. Staying up late every night memorizing how to balance chemical equations for an AP test is an UTTERLY fatal thing to do for someone who dreams of majoring in music in college. Completely pointless.

Keep in mind that universities are flexible - if your GPA from high school is slightly low, but you play a stunning audition, then they will most likely make an exception for you. Vice Versa of that is also true. Just make sure you pick one thing and pursue it rather than try to balance two baskets on one head.

Hope this helps

#470891 06/03/06 01:32 PM
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 228
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 228
I think the advices given so far are good. You need to prioritise wisely your learning workloads. Its impossible to excel in everything. You will realise that as you progress further in your study that good grades are not necessary for a successful career. In fact, you may have to sacrifice your grades for some practical reasons. Being street smart is far more important in the end. Learn what you love, but be aware too of what the market demands.

#470892 06/03/06 04:40 PM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 830
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 830
God... the glories of high school! I myself am facing the same problem, DaWF. I am taking 3 AP Classes, Chemistry, Algebra II Trig, and on top of that, 3 health prjects per grading period... It really does leave little time to practice, but I have made the decision that piano is more important to me. I have found doing my homework the class before often helps.... hehe. I'm sorry I don't have a solution for you, but right now I'm just trying to maintain my GPA by doing the bare-minimum.

If you find a solution, let me know!!! smile

#470893 06/04/06 03:36 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 295
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 295
Quote
Originally posted by BruceD:
Right now, for some of you, it may be academic commitments; later in life, it will be other responsibilities, but one of the hardest lessons in life is learning to accept the fact that one can't always do what one would like to do when one wants to do it.
I was going to respond to this thread by writing, "Welcome to 'real life.' This is what it's all about--figuring out how to make music a priority when other responsibilities insist on pushing music out of the way." But BruceD pretty much said everything else I wanted to say. Good post, Bruce.


Coming back to piano lessons again in my middle age, and enjoying every minute.
#470894 06/04/06 10:07 PM
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 112
B
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
B
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 112
Right now academics are also very important to your future. I know how you feel, though. It takes a lot of self control to study instead of practice. The summer is almost here and then you can practice all you want. Also, when audition time rolls around, always keep in mind something that I was told at one of my auditions last year. They said that they are not looking for a finished product, just for someone with potential and the willingness to work. (This was at Westminser Choir College. $$$) If your grades are good it will show them that you are a hard worker, and they look for that. As for potential, they can tell what you're capable of whe they hear you. You will do fine. Good luck with everything! Keep working! It's the key to success.


"It's easy to play any instrument: you just have to touch the right key at the right time and the instrument will play by itself."
--J.S. Bach

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
Our Fall 2021 Free Newsletter is Out , see it here!
---------------------
Selling my Hammond & Leslie!
---------------------
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Farewell Cassie, we hardly knew ye
by c++ - 10/23/21 08:49 PM
What is this piano?
by Gleb1 - 10/23/21 05:55 PM
Lesson cost in Worcester, MA area
by casualappraiser - 10/23/21 05:02 PM
What do you think of Alan Fraser?
by ranjit - 10/23/21 03:01 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics209,716
Posts3,141,667
Members103,092
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5