Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.5 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!


SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Virtual Sheet Music
Download Sheet Music Instantly
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Sheet Music...
(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
(125ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Modern Piano Moving
Modern Piano Moving
(ad)
Piano Buyer Guide
Piano Buyer Spring 2017
(ad)
Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restorations and sales
Who's Online Now
119 registered members (anamnesis, ajames, accordeur, alans, agraffe, 7uturu, 27 invisible), 1,732 guests, and 9 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#413997 - 11/11/01 05:42 PM Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
Just thought that I would bring up the topic again incase anybody new likes to compose. Some of the older members might remember this particular topic from months ago. I have composed several peices myself, some easy, some difficult, and others lie somewhere inbetween. (For my level of skill at the current moment, that is). So, anyone else out there compose? If so, where do you get your inspiration from, how do you find a tune that you like? I usually play random chords, scales and keys until I find a combonation that sounds good, then work from there. Other times, a tune just comes to me and I try to match it on the piano.

[ November 11, 2001: Message edited by: jgoo ]


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#413998 - 11/11/01 08:14 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 433
Amy Offline
Full Member
Amy  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 433
Upstate New York
I pretty much do the same things that you do. I just mess around until I find something that I like. I write mainly for small percussion ensembles (the mallet instruments mostly) Right now I am working on something for a percussion quartet that has 2 vibes, bells, chimes, and random percussion effects. I am somewhat of a percussionist so I play in the ensemble.


-Amy-
*Visit my page! http://www.expage.com/pianopalace
#413999 - 11/11/01 08:58 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 902
PianoMuse Offline
500 Post Club Member
PianoMuse  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 902
Philly, PA
i would really like to start composing! next semester i am taking private composition lessons from the chair of my music department composer, it should be good ( if not challenging,as i have heard he is quite tough). I hope to have some exciting new peices by next summer!


"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." ~Rachmaninoff
#414000 - 11/11/01 10:48 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 106
SethW Offline
Full Member
SethW  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 106
Anyone who has read a lot of my posts probablyknows that I love composing. I got my degree in composition from the University of Soeul Korea. I'm sure that many pianist dabble with trying to create something, but truly composing a full length piece can be both time consuming and require great patience(especially for orchestral works). It requires great musical knowledge as well as musical instinct. I'm currently working on creating a sonata for the piano. I have also created works for violin,string quartet, guitar, choral, and some orchestral works. Sometimes a theme will come to your head but it is more work than magical inspiration. There are a small group of truly talented people that have the ability to create music on the spur of the moment. I know a friend (originally from Jamaica) who teaches several choirs, including one at UTA, that plays the piano for chuch. Anyways, besides being one of the finest pianist I know, he literally creates concert quality accompaniments from scratch for any song (this is not improvising since the accomapniments are not based on any score and they are not extensions of the melody). At any rate, composing is a serious field of work. Taking some courses on composing might be beneficial, but the road to creating good pieces will require lots of time effort and will be laden with thorns.

[ November 11, 2001: Message edited by: SethW ]

(ad ) MusicNotes.com
sheet music search
#414001 - 11/11/01 10:57 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
CDSheridan Offline
Full Member
CDSheridan  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
How large are most of the pieces you guys compose? I'm thinking about restarting composing myself during my spare time just as something fun. I'm thinking about either composing a set of 24 etudes for piano or a piano sonata. Some other big project I could work on and enjoy (along with preparing for that recital next year.)

And you're right when you say that composition is a very thorny path. I've been doing it on and off for a long time and I've never actually produced anything yet.

[ November 11, 2001: Message edited by: CDSheridan ]

#414002 - 11/11/01 11:50 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
Most of my compositions are short, but I also have some pretty long compositions. All are for piano, since I don't know how to play any other instruments. I do have a question. How do you decide what to classify your compositions as? I mean, how do you know to call it an Etude, Prelude, Impromptu, Nocturne, Sonata, Waltz, Melody, Rondo, Polonaise, etc. etc. etc. Just wondering.


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414003 - 11/12/01 12:01 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
I've also gotten a little inspiration from emotion. Also, I have found a little inspiration from the people and settings around me, and from scenery. Much like Modest Mussorgsky found inspiration to write pictures at an exhibition.


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414004 - 11/12/01 12:55 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
CDSheridan Offline
Full Member
CDSheridan  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
Here's how you classify pieces:

Etude: a piece whose structure is built on a particular technical problem.

Waltz: a piece in 3/4 or 3/8 characterized by a strong first beat.

Polonaise: a piece in 3/4 characterized by a (two sixteenth-notes followed by an eighth note) rhythm (Sorry. Hard to draw notes on a message board.)

Mazurka: a piece in 3/4 characterized by a strong third beat.

Sonata: a larger-scale work consisting of two or more movements (unless you're Liszt, Scarlatti, or Scriabin.)

Nocturne: a generally calmer piece that evokes images of the night.

Barcarolle: a calmer piece that is characterized by a rocking or swaying rhythm.

Rondo: a piece where a particular theme reappears repeatedly.

Scherzo: a "musical joke," until Chopin came along and just made it a piece with a Presto tempo marking and usually, but not always, a 3/4 time signature.

Ballade: a piece that has been inspired by literary sources (I guess. But I guess we could all just call any random piece a ballade if we claim it came from a "literary source" but do not specify where.)

Fugue: a polyphonic contrapuntal piece.

Theme and Variations: Theme and Variations.

Berceuse: a calmer, more lyrical piece.

Moto Perpetuo: a fast piece that gets progressively faster.

Romanze: a usually slow, lyrical piece.

Toccata: usually a lighter, more quicksilver, fast piece.

Funeral March: a slow piece with a strict march rhythm in a minor key characterized by a lumbering dotted rhythm and a lyrical middle section in a related major key.

Minuet: I don't know; 3/4 rhythm I guess. Help me out on this.

Humoresque: a more light-hearted piece.

Jeux d'eau: a piece characterized by arpeggios played piano or pianissimo.

Tarantella: a fast dance in six-eight meter.

Danse Macabre: a dance with a dark, sinister tone to it.

Forlane: a dance that was condemned by the Pope at some point. I can't remember its distinguishing characteristics though.

Rigaudon: Help me out.

Bolero: Help me out as well.

If your composition does not fall into any of these categories and is a larger-scale work: call it a Fantasy or Ballade. Or, be like Liszt and call it a Sonata. If your piece is light-hearted, you could follow Schumann's example and call it a Humoresque.

If your composition does not fall into any of these categories and is a smaller-scale work: call it Prelude, Impromptu, Intermezzo, Rhapsody, Ballade, Novelette, Album-Leaf, et cetera. Or give it an actual title.

Hope this helps. Anybody correct me if they see anything wrong or if they don't like my definitions. These were the best I could come up with in ten minutes.

[ November 12, 2001: Message edited by: CDSheridan ]

#414005 - 11/12/01 01:46 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
CDSheridan: Thankyou much for all the information. You have covered a lot. It is appericiated greatly. I'm sorry but I don't know the ones that you're not sure about. And by the way, what would a Moment Musical be? I love Schubert's Moment Musicals and would like to try and come up with one of my own.


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414006 - 11/12/01 09:26 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
CDSheridan Offline
Full Member
CDSheridan  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
I guess any shorter piece that really does not have a fixed structure or any particular distinguishing characteristics can be called a moment musical. I took a look at Schubert's moment musicaux and could not find anything special about them that made them moment musicaux and not anything else. As far as I knew, they could have been preludes, or ballades, or intermezzi.

I came up with a few more forms:

Spanish Dance: a "danceable" piece with Spanish flavor to it.

Tango and Samba: pieces in duple meter with a particular characteristic rhythm.

Serenade: I think a moderately slow lyrical piece.

Elegy: a slow, lyrical piece with a dark, tragic, lagrimoso feel.

Ave Maria: I can't think of the distinguishing characteristics for this one.

De Profundis: Help me out on this one also.

Songs without Words: I guess a shorter piece that also has no fixed structure or special distinguishing characteristics could qualify for this.

Lyrical Pieces: pieces that are lyrical.

Hope this helps a bit. And if anybody could fill in the missing definitions or if anybody does not like any of my definitions, please, by all means, reply. (I would also like to hear from anybody who has managed to compose some of these forms. :D)

[ November 12, 2001: Message edited by: CDSheridan ]

#414007 - 11/12/01 10:47 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 155
Josh Offline
Full Member
Josh  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 155
Lexington, KY
WOW! eek (The face represents more "holy cow!" than "eek!" necessarily).

CDSheridan,
I don't compose myself (can't even read the stuff), but if I ever do, I am going to save those last couple posts of yours. Immensely informative! I had always wondered what the differences between all of those were. Again, kudos on those posts.

Josh


Josh
#414008 - 11/12/01 11:59 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
Nina Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Nina  Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,467
Phoenix, AZ
I'm with Josh... this was a great post. I'm working on some of the missing pieces, minuet, bolero, etc. I suppose "I know it when I hear it" isn't really a suitable definition?

Also figured that ballade indicated a song with a strong, cantabile-type melody (e.g., ballad form from singing). Perhaps I'm wrong, though.

Great post! It would have taken me ten days, not ten minutes, to come up with those definitions.
Nina

#414009 - 11/13/01 12:58 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
CDSheridan: Thankyou much! Exteamly informative posts! I have copied them and saved them into my computer. They will come in handy in the future.


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414010 - 11/13/01 01:01 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
Quote
Originally posted by CDSheridan:
Hope this helps a bit.


More than you can believe.

[ November 13, 2001: Message edited by: jgoo ]


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414011 - 11/13/01 01:18 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,555
Brendan Online content
Brendan  Online Content


Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,555
McAllen, TX
I have to strongly disagree with several of these.

Quote
Originally posted by CDSheridan:

Sonata: a larger-scale work consisting of two or more movements (unless you're Liszt, Scarlatti, or Scriabin.)


The idea of a single-movement sonata is something that pervaded almost the entire 20th century, and arguably stems from Beethoven op. 110 and his extensive use of motivic saturation in that sonata. Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, Miaskovsky, Lowell Liebermann, and many others all capitalized on single movement sonata form. Also, Scarlatti's "Sonatas" aren't sonatas. They were published under the title "Essercizi per gravicembalo" (Exercises for cembalo). The title "sonata" was later applied to them because of the progressive use of rounded binary form.

Quote

Rondo: a piece where a particular theme reappears repeatedly.


ABACABA

Quote

Scherzo: a "musical joke," until Chopin came along...


Beethoven op. 2 #2, op. 2 #3, (both of which are exceptional cases considering the strong precedent of the minuet in the four movement sonata structure) op. 14 #2, op. 26, etc. all have marked scherzi, not to mention almost all of the symphonies. Chopin's scherzi aren't even scherzi in the strict sense of the word, actually being closer to rondo form than anything else.

Quote

Theme and Variations: Theme and Variations.


You can't use a word to define itself. In the case of Haydn's f minor variations, the piece is anything but a set of variations because of the idiomatic use of development within the variation structure that Haydn uses.

Quote

Moto Perpetuo: a fast piece that gets progressively faster.


Or stays the same tempo (with a change maybe in the coda) a la the toccatas of Schumann and Prokofiev.

Quote

Toccata: usually a lighter, more quicksilver, fast piece.


What about the toccatas of Bach and the other Baroque masters? To them, a toccata was a large (and possibly multi-movement) work with sections of sections of freestyle improvisation alternating with strict, contrapuntal ones. The use of the term toccata by romantic and contemporary composers has nothing to do with a baroque toccata and is more akin to perpetual motion.

Quote

Jeux d'eau: a piece characterized by arpeggios played piano or pianissimo.


That's not a form for a piece; it was a title adopted by Liszt and Ravel to duplicate on the piano the atmosphere of water. Both of these pieces have extended "fff" climaxes.

Quote

If your composition does not fall into any of these categories and is a larger-scale work: call it a Fantasy or Ballade. Or, be like Liszt and call it a Sonata. If your piece is light-hearted, you could follow Schumann's example and call it a Humoresque.


????????????????????????????????

The Liszt sonata is one of the most ingenious applications of sonata form in the 19th century - he telescopes both sonata-allegro form and an entire four movement sonata into one movement. Not to mention that the music is his greatest pianistic achivement.

Schumann's Humoresque is notably one of the most sarcastic and dark pieces in his ouevre. His admitted inspiration for the piece was to portray how pathetic he thought performers were and how they had to serve the whims of their social superiors .

[ November 13, 2001: Message edited by: Brendan ]

#414012 - 11/13/01 03:28 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 20,290
BruceD Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
BruceD  Offline

Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 20,290
Victoria, BC
Who was it who said : "... a little learning is a dangerous thing ..."?

Broad, inaccurate generalisations are just as dangerous.


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
#414013 - 11/13/01 03:35 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 155
Josh Offline
Full Member
Josh  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 155
Lexington, KY
Sorry we're not all authorities on these things. Some of those may be inaccurate, but before I didn't know what hardly ANY of those were. So for me at least, those "generalizations" were rather helpful.

Josh


Josh
#414014 - 11/13/01 07:08 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 193
okat47 Offline
Full Member
okat47  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 193
Canada
Hi.
I love to compose. The largest thing I've written is the 1st movement of a sonata for brass quintet. I've written some small pieces, and loads of beginnings of pieces. is there some way that we could all share our works, and get some feed back?

#414015 - 11/13/01 10:43 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
CDSheridan Offline
Full Member
CDSheridan  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
Okay then, I realize that those who pointed out that some of my definitions were not quite accurate may have been right. Giving definitions might not be the best thing to do here since there could be so many exceptions to each rule. I guess another way to classify pieces would be to look at what you have written and...

1. If your piece is in 3/4 meter and has a strong first beat, then your piece could be a waltz.

2. If your piece is in 3/4 meter has the correct rhythm for a polonaise (the characteristic two sixteenth notes and eighth note) then your piece could be a polonaise.

3. If your piece is in 3/4 and has an emphasized third beat, then your piece could be a mazurka.

4. If your piece has the ABACABA form (Thank you Brendan) then your piece could be a rondo.

5. If your piece is polyphonic and contrapuntal, then it could be a fugue.

6. If your piece is calmer and lyrical, then it could be a nocturne, romanze, serenade, lyrical piece, or berceuse. If it also has a "swaying" or "rocking" rhythm, then it could also be a barcarolle. If the piece is more tragic and lagrimoso, then it could be an elegy.

7. If your piece resembles a fast dance in 6/8 time, then it could be a tarantella.

8. If your piece involves structures built out of a technical problem or two or perhaps three, then it could be an etude.

9. If your piece has a theme and variations, then obviously it could be a theme and variations.

10. If your piece has a lumbering dotted rhythm, is written in a minor key, and has a central section in a related major key, then it could be a funeral march.

11. If your piece is in 3/4 or 3/8 time and has a fast tempo on the whole, then it could be a scherzo.

12. If the tempo of your piece is fast, quicksilver, and is of perpetual motion, then it could be a moto perpetuo or a toccata.

13. If your piece is "danceable" but not necessarily in 3/4 rhythm and has some sort of Spanish flavor to it, then it could be a Spanish Dance. If the piece is in duple rhythm and has the characteristic rhythm of either a tango or samba, then it could be a tango or samba.

You could probably call any smaller-scale work by these names: prelude, ballade, novelette, impromptu, rhapsody, moment musical. These are all works that have no specified form or special distinguishing characteristics.

Any larger scale work could probably be called by these names: sonata, fantasy, ballade.

Keep in mind that you could pretty much name your composition whatever you want so long as it's in reason (examples of something unreasonable: calling a piece in 7/4 rhythm a waltz or a fast, light-hearted piece a funeral march.) Hope this helps.

P. S. A few of the definitions I put up were a bit of a joke. I don't think many of you would be writing forlanes, rigaudons, ave maria, or de profundis.

#414016 - 11/13/01 11:36 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,555
Brendan Online content
Brendan  Online Content


Joined: May 2001
Posts: 5,555
McAllen, TX
I still think that the point is being missed. Let's take sonata form for example. One one end of the chronology, we have rounded binary form and the Essercizi of Scarlatti, and on the other end, we have the compact one-movement sonatas of Scriabin's later years.

Composers sought to find new possibilities through the old conventions of sonata form - Chopin leaves out the first theme in the recapitulation of his sonatas (second and third sonatas, as does Tchaikovsky in the first movement of the Sixth Symphony); Liszt condenses four movements into one; Beethoven allides the slow movement and the last movement(s), and wrote codas as long as recapitulations ( first movement of the Waldstein); Haydn uses monothematicism to a degree that development sections become sometimes longer than the exposition and the recapitulation combined (Hoboken 52. Mozart, by comparison, developed his themes at a less sophisticated level and had a greater number of themes in one movement to compensate).

The point is that you can't typecast genres like you're doing because the whole point of musical evolution is to find flexibility within the convention. Again to underscore my point:


Quote
examples of something unreasonable: calling a piece in 7/4 rhythm a waltz or a fast, light-hearted piece a funeral march.



What about the second movement of Tchaikovsky's Sixth Symphony? It's a Waltz in 5/4, and yet fits so beautifully and elegantly into the metric framework that the meter is barely noticable. There are few "unreasonable" means of expression in music; can you imagine how tasteless music would be if every composer followed formal traditions to the letter?

#414017 - 11/13/01 11:48 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
CDSheridan Offline
Full Member
CDSheridan  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 27
Okay, I understand what you are trying to say. But somebody asked for a way to figure out how to title their pieces. I'm just trying to give them a bit of an idea of how to start doing that. I'm therefore not trying (at least anymore) to list a strict set of rules that a particular piece has to follow to be a ____. And notice how I kept saying "COULD be a waltz, COULD be a scherzo, etc."

[ November 13, 2001: Message edited by: CDSheridan ]

#414018 - 11/14/01 06:48 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 722
magnezium Offline
500 Post Club Member
magnezium  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 722
Singapore
Quote
Originally posted by CDSheridan:
Scherzo: a "musical joke," until Chopin came along and just made it a piece with a Presto tempo marking and usually, but not always, a 3/4 time signature.


Chopin's scherzi do have some humour in them. Though it isn't very clearly expressed, it's still there in a subtle, suggestive kind of way.

#414019 - 11/14/01 10:04 AM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 808
Samejame Offline
500 Post Club Member
Samejame  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 808
NL, Canada
If my recollection is correct, a "Minuet" is a relatively short piece, usually composed for dancing. I like to consider it disco - 17th century style. They usually followed a theme tied to traditional dances of the period, and were performed at large galas, balls etc. They usually had repeats in the main theme, and the performer had the option of playing thru them or repeating, depending on how long he wanted to keep the people on the dance floor moving.

Jamie


"A cynic knows the price of everything and the value of nothing" Oscar Wilde.
#414020 - 11/14/01 07:18 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
jgoo Offline
3000 Post Club Member
jgoo  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,974
Seattle, Washington, USA
Isn't a minuet also an ABA formatted piece?


For off-topic discussion, please feel free to visit www.coffee-room.com
#414021 - 11/14/01 10:02 PM Re: Calling All Composers (again)  
Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 106
SethW Offline
Full Member
SethW  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jun 2001
Posts: 106
There are, especially in this more modern day and age, so many exceptions to the rule. Many of those terms original meanings are rather antiquated, as such, a piece that carries a specific name does not always *have* to comply with everything in the definition.
There most certainly is a way to share our compositions. Midi would be the idea format. Midi is one of the easiest ways to compose. I assumed most of you would have already known that. Because I certainly hope you are not still using the ink method wink .

[ November 14, 2001: Message edited by: SethW ]


Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Piano Acc. & Gift Items in
Piano World's Online Store
In PianoSupplies.com ,(a division of Piano World) our online store for piano and music gifts and accessories, party goods, tuning equipment, piano moving equipment, benches, lamps Caster Cups and more.


Free Shipping on Jansen Artist Piano Benches
ad
Pierce Piano Atlas


(ad)
Pianoteq
Grotrian Concert
Royal
for Pianoteq out now
(ad)
A. Geyer Pianos
A. Geyer Pianos
What's Hot!!
Why Do You Play The Piano?
-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
-------------------
Piano Classified Ads
New Topics - Multiple Forums
State of Continuous Pedaling with DPs
by Rador. 05/22/17 07:25 PM
Kawai VPC1 to control MP7?
by phosita. 05/22/17 05:51 PM
Scarlatti repeated notes
by estelleroux. 05/22/17 02:32 PM
Light out on RD800
by Averasboro. 05/22/17 02:20 PM
Casio GP 300vs400vs500
by Nordomus. 05/22/17 01:54 PM
(ad)
Sheet Music Plus
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Forum Statistics
Forums44
Topics179,819
Posts2,628,832
Members87,843
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Report Problems With New Forums
Report Problems with New Forums Here!
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2017 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0