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structure of practices #387315 08/24/04 06:55 PM
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I've had a revived interest in piano playing lately (which should have come to me when I first started when I was nine), so I've been practicing about four to six hours a day now.

my question is how do all of you guys structure your practices and do you practice your whole repetoire in one session or do you split it up.

I've been experimenting with new ways of practicing, so I'm trying to see what others have to offer.

thanks a bundle smile

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Re: structure of practices #387316 08/25/04 01:53 AM
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There's a current thread going : "Those who practise (practice) long hours ..."


BruceD
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Re: structure of practices #387317 08/25/04 02:00 AM
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AnnaMatthew Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by BruceD:
There's a current thread going : "Those who practise (practice) long hours ..."
Bruce, sorry, but i keep getting confused over the c and s in the practice/practice. I heard you use it the same way as advice/advise. Somehow i know how to use it for advice/advise but not practice/practise

Re: structure of practices #387318 08/25/04 02:37 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by skeletony:
Bruce, sorry, but i keep getting confused over the c and s in the practice/practice. I heard you use it the same way as advice/advise. Somehow i know how to use it for advice/advise but not practice/practise
Same principle - use advice/practice when the word is used as a noun, and advise/practise when it is used as a verb. smile

Re: structure of practices #387319 08/25/04 03:25 AM
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I'm sorry, but there is no such word as "practise". "Advise" is a verb. "Advice" is a noun. "Practice" can be either a noun or a verb, depending on context. e.g. "I intend to practice law when I pass the bar". and "My law practice is booming!".

hope this helps.


Michael

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Re: structure of practices #387320 08/25/04 04:06 AM
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minesweeper99 Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by MAK:
I'm sorry, but there is no such word as "practise". "Advise" is a verb. "Advice" is a noun. "Practice" can be either a noun or a verb, depending on context. e.g. "I intend to practice law when I pass the bar". and "My law practice is booming!".
hope this helps.
I believe the difference between "practice" and "practise" is present in British English but not American.

Re: structure of practices #387321 08/25/04 04:17 AM
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AnnaMatthew Offline
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Quote
Originally posted by minesweeper99:
Quote
Originally posted by skeletony:
[b]Bruce, sorry, but i keep getting confused over the c and s in the practice/practice. I heard you use it the same way as advice/advise. Somehow i know how to use it for advice/advise but not practice/practise
Same principle - use advice/practice when the word is used as a noun, and advise/practise when it is used as a verb. smile [/b]
Thanks for the confirmation. And oh i learn a new thing everyday- theres no diff in american english for practise/ce. I learn british english, so i was taught the difference but obviously id wasnt a good student.

Re: structure of practices #387322 08/25/04 05:33 AM
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Well I'll be. As skeletony said.... I learn a new thing everyday.


accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)
Re: structure of practices #387323 08/25/04 08:15 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by MAK:
I'm sorry, but there is no such word as "practise". "Advise" is a verb. "Advice" is a noun. "Practice" can be either a noun or a verb, depending on context. e.g. "I intend to practice law when I pass the bar". and "My law practice is booming!".

hope this helps.
Hate to disagree....I know how bad that makes me feel sometimes, but the Oxford Universal Dictionary clearly differentiates between the useof the word 'practise' as a verb, and 'practice' as a noun. Both definitions are about 3 inches long and seem to bear equal weight.


accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, Õun (apple in Estonian)
Re: structure of practices #387324 08/26/04 06:38 AM
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I believe "practice" acts as a noun and as a verb whereas "practise" acts only as a verb, and only in certain areas (e.g., England).

Re: structure of practices #387325 08/26/04 05:22 PM
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I was always taught that in British spelling, which covers a lot of countries, "practise" is the only verb spelling.
I get very confused when I use "practice" adjectivally. I am never sure whether I am deriving it from the verb, or from the noun, and so I don't know how to spell it in that context.

Does anyone know? (Yes, the British way)

Re: structure of practices #387326 08/27/04 03:34 AM
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MAK Offline
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Hmmm. The word "practise" is not in my little dictionary here at the beach. But, I will accept that it may be proper British usage, and expect to find "practise" in my unabridged dictionary when I return home. I guess I should not have been so hasty in my response. I teach paralegal students and have to constantly correct their horrendous spelling and grammar; perhaps I pounced too quickly.


Michael

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Re: structure of practices #387327 08/27/04 04:30 AM
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I remember the first time I met my Dutch wife's aunt. She spoke to me in English with a British accent. I commented, 'you speak with a British accent,' whereupon she replied, 'well, it _is_ English!' We never got along.


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