2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
71 members (antune, BMKE, Bill McKaig,RPT, accordeur, 5stringbanjo, 0day, AJB, 11 invisible), 691 guests, and 288 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 665
P
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 665
I think of acoustic pianos as not outdated, but outside of time entirely. They do not rely on any modern technology at all for their repair nor maintenance. Everything that's in a piano can be fixed using Victorian-era tech that doesn't rely on electricity. In fact, this is one of the compelling reasons to own such an instrument. In the event of a societal collapse, you can still make music on your steam-era piano and maintain it indefinitely with simple tools and technologies. This cannot be said of any electronic device so far devised.

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 33,022
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 33,022
Originally Posted by Jean Claude
So pick another date, it doesn't really matter. Here we go:

1905....."can't see these horseless carriages taking over from a proper pony and trap"

1948....."these dreadful 33s have no soul, won't ever replace proper 78s"

etc, etc.
I doubt many people said what you imagine. The auto and 33 were pretty clearly improvements. Although digitals/hybrids do have some advantages over acoustic pianos(cost, no tuning needed, can be used with headphones), one cannot say they are clear improvements. And grands were clear improvements of square pianos.

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 61
Y
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Y
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 61
Many musical are timeless in many respects. Saxophones and flutes, while having enjoyed developments mostly related to production methods, function largely the same as when they were first invented. The actual sound wave produced inside a modern flute/clarinet/oboe/saxophone is largely the same as it was one hundred years ago. The violin is even more timeless in this regard. Blind tests have shown that people can't hear the difference between a three hundred year old Stradivarius and modern top tier violins.

Pianos on the other hand, come in quite many different scale designs. Of course, many of these are old, like M&H and S&S, but the sound produced is by all means timeless. A good musical instrument design like those just never becomes old. Sure we have modern scale designs now which are incredibly even across the registers, but that's not always a positive. "Improve" too much on the piano, and people will think it's no longer sounding right.

My two or three cents.

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 789
J
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 789
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Jean Claude
So pick another date, it doesn't really matter. Here we go:

1905....."can't see these horseless carriages taking over from a proper pony and trap"

1948....."these dreadful 33s have no soul, won't ever replace proper 78s"

etc, etc.
I doubt many people said what you imagine. The auto and 33 were pretty clearly improvements. Although digitals/hybrids do have some advantages over acoustic pianos(cost, no tuning needed, can be used with headphones), one cannot say they are clear improvements. And grands were clear improvements of square pianos.

Well there's no doubt that modern cars are better than a horse and cart. When cars first came out however they were slow, noisy, dirty and prone to breaking down but they improved rapidly to the point where they were clearly the better bet in every way. Maybe the same will happen with digital pianos and ten, twenty years from now acoustic pianos will start to look like a quaint anachronism. When you consider how far they have come in the last 20 years it is genuinely impossible to imagine what they might be like in 2042.

This is, of course, pure speculation and in 20 years I expect to be, at best, dribbling quietly into a bib somewhere, so I shall never know.


Sauter Alpha 160, Yamaha N3 Avant Grand, Sauter Studio Upright (1974)
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,235
C
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,235
Originally Posted by Jean Claude
When you consider how far they have come in the last 20 years it is genuinely impossible to imagine what they might be like in 2042.
Indeed, they have come a long way in 20 years. Unfortunately the last bit to the top is always by far the most difficult and takes the longest.


Yamaha U1A, Roland LX706

South Wales, UK
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 591
G
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 591
The acoustic piano is one of those things that has so many inherent imperfections (inharmonicity, sympathetic resonance, etc) that it's almost impossible to imitate using electronic means, and it's those imperfections that we so dearly want because that's what gives it character and warmth. To a lesser degree, it's the same thing with imitating the sound and character of a Hammond organ and Leslie speaker. Getting that grit and slightly different response every time it's played is difficult. What is there is say about the expressiveness of the violin? You can easily imitate the steady sound of the string itself, but varying tone and volume from bowing the string is difficult. This is similar to nature vs human made things. In nature, every animal, tree, leaf, lake, mountain is slightly different, while human made things tend to get dumbed down to flat, squared off shapes, and identical in large numbers. We could say that acoustic instruments are more like nature.


What do snowflakes and Chickerings have in common? There are no two exactly alike!
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 591
G
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 591
Originally Posted by Rich Galassini
Hi all,

Here is the bad news. Acoustic piano sales for the past decade (excluding the pandemic) have slid a bit. In 2019, there was a total of a little over 31,000 new acoustic pianos sold in the USA. That is compared to a little over 41,000 in 2011 (the beginning of the decade).

Here is the good news. The number of console or grand style digital pianos has continued to increase. In 2011 there were just over 120,000 digital pianos sold. In 2019, there were 174,000 digital pianos sold. That means that between 2011 and 2019 the industry went from 161,000 total units to 205,000 total units in 2019. Does this mean the acoustic piano is going away? No way.

The fact is that a digital piano, IMHO, is often an easier decision for families getting a first piano than an acoustic. It is a cleaner purchase in that it has little to no maintenance, fits places an acoustic will not, can be played with head phones, is easier to move etc. It is true that the performance of even the finest digital pianos, like the Clavinovas, do not equal the performance of a fine studio piano. But they are world's better than most of the mediocre to terrible spinets and compressed action consoles that so many families bought when I was a child.

In our industry a few of us give trade ups to digital piano buyers for a specific amount of time to encourage them to consider an acoustic piano. I just traded up a family from a 3k digital piano to a 10k professional studio this morning.

So, IMHO, the piano is not dead, but it does continue to evolve. Technology is not going anywhere.


My 2 cents,

That reminds me of a section in the Alfred Dolge book "Pianos and their Makers" discussing how piano maker were concerned that when Joseph P Hale introduced the "commercial" (ie: cheap) piano, the piano would be devalued. Hale responded that his inexpensive pianos would allow it to be more accessible and that more people could learn to play, and then those that went on to become proficient pianists would upgrade to better instruments later. The book points out that his argument turned out to be true. Nowadays, the digital is the new Hale piano.


What do snowflakes and Chickerings have in common? There are no two exactly alike!
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 12,875
Platinum Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Platinum Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 12,875
Originally Posted by guyl
That reminds me of a section in the Alfred Dolge book "Pianos and their Makers" discussing how piano maker were concerned that when Joseph P Hale introduced the "commercial" (ie: cheap) piano, the piano would be devalued. Hale responded that his inexpensive pianos would allow it to be more accessible and that more people could learn to play, and then those that went on to become proficient pianists would upgrade to better instruments later. The book points out that his argument turned out to be true. Nowadays, the digital is the new Hale piano.

I think that is an accurate assessment, guyl.

This also reminds me of the Lester Betsy Ross spinet piano. Lester was a Philadelphia maker who hand built pianos and made some very formidable instruments. After surviving the Depression and WWII, they decided to concentrate on making an affordable upright as their primary offering. The Betsy Ross spinet was born. It was designed to serve a family for a couple of decades, held tuning like a rock, and was a little more than 1/2 of the better made competitors in that sphere.

The result is that today piano techs love to belly ache about how bad these pianos are today, but the last one was built in 1960. These pianos did their job decades ago and without them, I personally know several pianists who might never have had the opportunity to play at all.

Thanks for the comment guyl.


Rich Galassini
Cunningham Piano Company
Visit one of our four locations
(215) 991-0834 direct
rich@cunninghampiano.com
Learn more about the Matchless Cunningham
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,121
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,121
FWIW - Regarding the OP's original question about the acoustic piano going extinct, it might, and I, for one, if I'm still alive, will mourn that as a loss.

It's been a couple of years since I played a really good hybrid, and in that year I performed on an N2 and an NU-1, and I helped select a Novus NV-10 for a university.

They were VERY good, particularly the way they felt, but... ultimately, they sounded like very good recordings of good pianos.

To the argument that I'm like the folks who thought the horseless carriage would replace the horse drawn carriage, I have some things to say that would get me banned, so I won't.

What I will say is this: as someone who performs regularly, records regularly, and on special occasions gets to sit in the audience and listen to music, I can say, that even the best recordings, heard over very good equipment, sound like... recordings. They are not the same as listening to and watching a live performance. Cases in point:

wife and I attended a "Messiah" at Strathmore Hall outside Washington, DC. We splurged on seats about 15 rows back from the stage. It was a great performance, and a great experience. The "live" music was different than anything recorded, or amplified.

about a week later, a German friend of mine posted a link to a performance at the Elbe River concert hall. The group that performed was equal or better to the one we experienced live. The camera and audio work was absolutely stellar. We listened over some 3 cubic foot, 3 way speakers I built from plans developed by a professor at Georgia Tech 30 years ago (they sound VERY natural). We watched it in 1080p on a 50" TV. But, it wasn't quite the same.

Does this mean that with advances in computer technology - e.g., quantum computing - more sophisticated sampling algorithms, etc, that, SOME DAY, we will have a recording that is sonically equal to live music, and maybe with a life size 3D hologram for the video - but I bet that day is not coming very soon, at least to the civilian market though we may have the equivalents in sophisticated military tech before then.

So, yes, SOME DAY, we may have a hybrid piano, that feels like a good acoustic, that sounds as good as an acoustic, that has a damper pedal that accurately models the way a real damper pedal works - at least on a particular acoustic piano on a particular day - but not soon. I doubt it will be inexpensive, ever.

I would also agree with Rich (as I have many times about other topics) that, for many, a digital or a hybrid, are a great choice. The footprint is smaller than for a grand. The recurring cost of tuning, for example, is gone, though, at some point, given sufficient wear, the actions will need regulation, but never voicing (or so I believe). And there are also things the digitals can do, push button transposition and alternate temperaments, record and playback, that an acoustic can't do.

But, at the end of the day, I don't care. I love acoustic pianos, and I hope they stay with us for a very long time.


Andrew Kraus, Pianist
Educated Amateur Tuner/Technician
I Make Music that Lifts People Up & Brings Them Together
Rockville, MD USA
www.AndrewKraus.com
www.YouTube.com/RockvillePianoGuy
Twitter at @IAmAPianist

1929 Steinert 6'10" (Close copy of New York S&S "B")
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 789
J
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 789
You seem to be a bit confused. It is hardly news that watching a recording of a concert on a TV screen is not the same as going to a concert, very few people would argue to the contrary, but you seem to want to imply that watching and hearing a live performance on a digital instrument would have the same sterility as watching a recorded concert. I just don't believe that this is so. By way of example, I went to an organ recital shortly before covid hit, performed on a large but entirely digital organ. It was a thrilling, even intoxicating experience and would have been no better, no more involving, had a traditional pipe organ been played. The suggestion that attending this performance was comparable to watching a concert on TV, even using a large screen and a big pair of speakers, is absurd and frankly laughable.

For a variety of technical reasons, an organ is easier to reproduce digitally than a piano and this is perhaps why digital pianos are behind organs in terms of development, but the idea that digital pianos will never reach - or even surpass - the level of the best acoustic instruments strikes me as plainly mistaken, the only question is when this might happen.

***

Last edited by Ken Knapp; 02/18/22 09:57 AM. Reason: Offensive remark removed.

Sauter Alpha 160, Yamaha N3 Avant Grand, Sauter Studio Upright (1974)
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 221
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 221
Originally Posted by Animisha
Originally Posted by Ubu
But assuming that digital technology will outdate acoustic pianos seems to me like assuming that the zillion of porn sites all over the internet will replace real sex.

I have such a good answer on this one, but I don't want to get banned. So let me just say that it involves a certain artificial thing that in many ways is better than the real thing. cool

I too do not wish to be banned so I'll try to walk this line very carefully and with the utmost respect.

I see your point and it's not a bad comparison. I for one spend much more time playing my DP's than my AP. Because I can do it without disturbing anyone. But also because my level of playing is such that when I know people are listening I get quite embarassed which effects my playing to the worse. So to me DP's are very practical. Just like porn can be when I'm for instance out of a relation or just alone for a period. Still - to experience "true" sex with a loving - and loved - partner is so much more than "just" sex. At least IMHO it's an all absorbing experience that involves so much more. And that's also how one might describe the difference between Digital and Acoustic piano playing. Of course YMMV.


Peter
--------------------------------
Yamaha U1 / Kawai CS11 / Kawai ES-120 / Hammond XK-3c
Working on: PCA Beginner Course and
Tim Richards - Improvising Blues Piano
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,121
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,121
Originally Posted by Jean Claude
You seem to be a bit confused. It is hardly news that watching a recording of a concert on a TV screen is not the same as going to a concert, very few people would argue to the contrary, but you seem to want to imply that watching and hearing a live performance on a digital instrument would have the same sterility as watching a recorded concert. I just don't believe that this is so
I'm not confused. I just happen to disagree with you. I did not imply, nor did I say, that watching and hearing a live performance on a digital instrument would have the same sterility as watching a recorded concert. I KNOW, having performed and watched/heard concerts on an N2, that there are things about the SOUND that are different. Feel free to differ with me, but do realize, I write with respect, it was not my intention to get into an argument with you. I also wrote that I thought that, at some future time, it could be the case that digital/hybrid pianos would fully replicate the sound and feel of a good acoustic piano. We are in agreement about that, if not on the timeline. Beyond that, no, I don't need "professional help", because I am passionate about acoustic pianos and music. You, sir, cross the line; you have insulted me publicly by your words. So do write whatever you like, or not. I won't be reading it, because I'm clicking on the "ignore" button on your profile.
###


Andrew Kraus, Pianist
Educated Amateur Tuner/Technician
I Make Music that Lifts People Up & Brings Them Together
Rockville, MD USA
www.AndrewKraus.com
www.YouTube.com/RockvillePianoGuy
Twitter at @IAmAPianist

1929 Steinert 6'10" (Close copy of New York S&S "B")
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Sadly as with all technology, yes I fear that eventually acoustics will eventually be obsolete like crt monitors and become dead technology but theres still a market for acoustic pianos, both uprights and grands thankfully so I presume that they will still stay with us for a long time, presumabely they will still be around and played in my lifetime.

So yeah as Seeker said at the end of the day, I don't care. I love acoustic pianos, and I hope they stay with us for a very long time.

Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 1,021
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 1,021
I don’t think the car analogy is a good one because cars are machines that exist for a practical purpose: to transport people between locations. They do this much more effectively than horse drawn carriages or rickshaws or bicycles or our feet. Even so, there are certainly plenty of occasions when we choose our feet or a bicycle.

Pianos are different. I think that they can serve a number of different purposes, and for some of these purposes, digital instruments are objectively more advantageous than their acoustic counterparts. But many people play piano to express themselves in music. That is a very personal thing, and for some, this is already best done on a digital piano. But as it is something personal and highly subjective, it seems to me very likely that 50 or 100 years from now, enough people will still prefer acoustic pianos for this purpose such that acoustic pianos will still be manufactured and played. Same thing for pianos as furniture pieces. I think enough people will continue to prefer them.

I guess the other side of this question is to what extent acoustic pianos will be computerized. This is a topic that’s come up in a couple threads recently about silent and player systems. To me, it seems a bit of a paradox to buy a musical instrument that you want to be silent. And while I understand the allure of silent practice, there’s also something sad about living a life where we feel that the only time we feel comfortable with people hearing us play is when it is close to performance standard. What is so terrible about family hearing a beginner practice? Or anyone practice? Why do we feel this must this be silenced, and only audible to the person playing and perhaps their teacher?

Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 27
B
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
B
Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 27
I don’t think cars, flat monitors or 33rpm records are the best comparisons out there in this discussion. As mentioned they were really improvements on the previous invention. A DP, though, is a reproduction of the AP. Look at another copycat. Will electric drum kits completely replace real ones? It doesn’t seem likely. They have their benefits - practicing and space saving to be sure. Drums, although, are a less-complicated instrument than a piano, but even drums interact with each other to some extent. I opted for a cheap set of acoustic drums to goof around as opposed to an elec set because I can feel the sticks kick back into my hand off the heads. And the instant snap of a snare is wonderfully satisfying compared to elecs with even the smallest latency. Plus, you FEEL the drums being played. Just like I can feel the bass section on my grand. And hear it echo off the ceiling. I’m sure we all can appreciate how, when you play one note on an AP, you are actually hearing and feeling the other 87 strings as well, even, to some extent with the dampers on. Even better, add some right pedal and it is a bit like pressing the throttle (the type with 6 Weber’s not some electric motor). This interaction really adds to the experience. And this, IMO, is where the DP falls short. But then, I’m getting older. I like old cars, old houses and old things in general.

Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Originally Posted by benz-tech
I like old cars, old houses and old things in general.

Heh, has nothing to do with getting old, Old cars are beloved even by young adults, I am 31 and I love the Chevrolet Bel Air even though I never rode in one and my dad never rode in one either, but still she is one beautiful car that modern cars lack.

Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 56
T
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
T
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 56
Personally I think the analogy of watching a music video online as opposed to hearing it in concert is a good analogy for this. Acoustic pianos will always have a place because they're the 'real thing'.

That being said, I find it likely that digital pianos will continue gaining ground. Acoustics are going to become more of a rarity, whereas digitals will become what people imagine when you say the word 'piano' in the future.

The reason is simple; accessibility. Whether it be the cost or the silent aspect, in modern day life there are very few reasons why anyone other than an advanced pianist should even consider an acoustic piano. It is objectively a bad decision for most people (considering their daily needs) to get an acoustic over a digital.

Acoustics will never fully die out but I'm fairly confident they will become an exclusive experience. I love acoustic pianos, however innovation is needed to stay alive. In my opinion it's a good thing that the alternative in digitals is becoming more prominent and keeping the piano as an instrument alive.

Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Originally Posted by ThomasG
The reason is simple; accessibility. Whether it be the cost or the silent aspect, in modern day life there are very few reasons why anyone other than an advanced pianist should even consider an acoustic piano. It is objectively a bad decision for most people (considering their daily needs) to get an acoustic over a digital.

Acoustics will never fully die out but I'm fairly confident they will become an exclusive experience. I love acoustic pianos, however innovation is needed to stay alive. In my opinion it's a good thing that the alternative in digitals is becoming more prominent and keeping the piano as an instrument alive.

Unless that pianist exclusively wants to play on a digital, sure, if that person has desire and capability of learning to play an acoustic it might not be a bad decision, whether if you're going to play for concerts or just upload videos of youtube with you remixing your favourite video game/anime/whatever or compose your own songs with an acoustic and you enjoy it, go for it, digital just doesn't give the same satisfaction, if anything the majority of the audience prefer to listen to acoustic then digital, atleast in youtube this seems to be the case, acoustic pianists are more popular there then ones that play exclusively on digital.

Hopefully that's true that acoustics will never die out, yes, fewer people will have access to acoustic in the future but people who have a deep love for acoustic will not be satisfied with a digital, digitals are merely a substitute and nothing more, can't replace the real instrument and will not in a long time.

Thankfully stores still sell acoustic pianos of both uprights and grands as of yet and there still are tuners out there to keep the acoustics alive as well as rentable rooms with acoustic instruments so as of yet they are not an exclusive experience, as long as people with deep love of acoustics exist there will be a demand for them.

Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 56
T
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
T
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 56
Originally Posted by LavaWave
Unless that pianist exclusively wants to play on a digital, sure, if that person has desire and capability of learning to play an acoustic it might not be a bad decision, whether if you're going to play for concerts or just upload videos of youtube with you remixing your favourite video game/anime/whatever or compose your own songs with an acoustic and you enjoy it, go for it, digital just doesn't give the same satisfaction, if anything the majority of the audience prefer to listen to acoustic then digital, atleast in youtube this seems to be the case, acoustic pianists are more popular there then ones that play exclusively on digital.

Hopefully that's true that acoustics will never die out, yes, fewer people will have access to acoustic in the future but people who have a deep love for acoustic will not be satisfied with a digital, digitals are merely a substitute and nothing more, can't replace the real instrument and will not in a long time.

Thankfully stores still sell acoustic pianos of both uprights and grands as of yet and there still are tuners out there to keep the acoustics alive as well as rentable rooms with acoustic instruments so as of yet they are not an exclusive experience, as long as people with deep love of acoustics exist there will be a demand for them.

I fully agree of course that for serious learning, at an intermediate+ level an acoustic will certainly be better. I have to digress though that it being a better instrument does not mean it's a better purchase by default.

Many people need the silent option. Furthermore, the price is the biggest factor -- you can get a weighted and semi decent beginner instrument for under $1000 where in the past even a new console would be quite a bit more expensive than that.

I think it's a wonderful thing that we have this accessible option available now. It means that even in the digital age, we're seeing many young people (myself included!) start out on learning the piano. Many of these will end up purchasing acoustics in the long-term.

It's quite funny. Despite all this arguing about digital vs acoustic, I actually believe that digitals and their prominence is the key to the survival of acoustics. It serves as the best possible gateway and marketing for acoustic pianos.

Last edited by ThomasG; 02/19/22 06:12 AM.
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2022
Posts: 165
Originally Posted by ThomasG
I fully agree of course that for serious learning, at an intermediate+ level an acoustic will certainly be better. I have to digress though that it being a better instrument does not mean it's a better purchase by default.

True, purchase an entry level piano first, digital will do fine for beginners and they can upgrade for an acoustic later.

Originally Posted by ThomasG
Many people need the silent option. Furthermore, the price is the biggest factor -- you can get a weighted and semi decent beginner instrument for under $1000 where in the past even a new console would be quite a bit more expensive than that.

People who live in an apartment, yes need the silent option, thankfully in my house I can close the door and windows and play within day hours like 5:00pm to 7:00pm maybe even 8:00pm but no longer then that, I'm fine with that.

Originally Posted by ThomasG
It's quite funny. Despite all this arguing about digital vs acoustic, I actually believe that digitals and their prominence is the key to the survival of acoustics. It serves as the best possible gateway and marketing for acoustic pianos.

True, serious pianists can then make the leap to the acoustic pianos.

Originally Posted by ThomasG
I think it's a wonderful thing that we have this accessible option available now. It means that even in the digital age, we're seeing many young people (myself included!) start out on learning the piano. Many of these will end up purchasing acoustics in the long-term.

Yeah that is my plan, once I start the music school in October I would be planning to buy an acoustic upright for home and find some rentable rooms with an acoustic grand in it, I've sent emails to music studios and the such and they said that yes they do have rentable rooms with an acoustic grand in it so I will contact them in the future when I got the practice in school with an acoustic, I'm excited to tickle the ivories of an acoustic grand myself.

Last edited by LavaWave; 02/19/22 06:25 AM.
Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Ken Knapp, Piano World 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Is a CPT necessary?
by Petoskeyguy - 08/13/22 11:07 AM
Yamaha clp 785 horrible chorus effect
by Chrisgilx - 08/13/22 10:51 AM
How are you learning?
by bennevis - 08/13/22 09:41 AM
Here am and a little help
by Mayopapayo - 08/13/22 07:14 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
What's Hot!!
FREE June Newsletter is Here!
--------------------
Forums RULES, Terms of Service & HELP
(updated 06/06/2022)
-------------------
Music Store Going Out of Business Sale!
---------------------
Mr. PianoWorld's Original Composition
---------------------
Sell Your Piano on our world famous Piano Forums!
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics214,377
Posts3,215,993
Members106,078
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5