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Moo :) Online Content OP
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Is there a piece with a similar style but easier than these 2 examples?





I know about aquarium from carnival of animals but something else please.

I have bought Sibelius but it's a bit hard. I'm trying to play easier faster pieces so maybe one day soon I could try but looking for something a little easier, about grade 8 abrsm grade standard.

Any suggestions?

Thanks

Last edited by Moo :); 01/27/22 08:56 PM.
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Have you looked at Chopin’s etude 25/1, also known as the Aeolian Harp? I’m not sure how it is rated for difficulty but it might be suitable.


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Hi, thanks for the suggestion but that is also too hard a piece.

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You could try Stephen Heller Op. 45 no. 9, or Clara Schumann op. 14.


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Thanks, that's perfect, great suggestion !!


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Originally Posted by Gooddog
Have you looked at Chopin’s etude 25/1, also known as the Aeolian Harp? I’m not sure how it is rated for difficulty but it might be suitable.
This is much harder than the two piece Moo said were too difficult for him.

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Rustle of Spring is not as hard as it looks or sounds - the RH arpeggios are easy because the hand stays put. Have you tried it out?

There's also this:


For RH workout but not arpeggios, Chopin's Minute Waltz and Mozart's K332 sonata's finale are good for developing speed:


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[quote=bennevis]Rustle of Spring is not as hard as it looks or sounds - the RH arpeggios are easy because the hand stays put. Have you tried it out?
There's also this:

Agree on Rustle, but the Debussy is FAR more difficult than the pieces the OP already rejected as too difficult.

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Agree on Rustle, but the Debussy is FAR more difficult than the pieces the OP already rejected as too difficult.
Only if you try to play it faster than you can manage. The OP is trying to develop speed using fairly simple notes, so he'd be starting slow and deliberate.

I first learnt it (by myself) when I was at Grade 7 ABRSM. I eventually played it at close to Gieseking's speed. (Other speeds are available smirk )

Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum (Children's Corner) is also a good workout for RH to develop speed, especially with 'weak' fingers.....and it's in C major.
The Gigue from Bach's Keyboard Partita No.1 in B flat is also good for developing coordination and speed.....and hand crossings whistle.


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Thank you for the suggestion. I think the Heller etude is the best as I can learn it myself.

In lessons am playing Scarlatti sonati and classical era pieces as I played mostly romantic for years before so I'm trying to learn the style (fast turns, scale runs, Alberti bass) so I'm not planning on learning this one in lessons. I'll see if I manage the Heller ok then I'll try the rustle one l, maybe when spring comes.

Thanks for the suggestion

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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Agree on Rustle, but the Debussy is FAR more difficult than the pieces the OP already rejected as too difficult.
Only if you try to play it faster than you can manage. The OP is trying to develop speed using fairly simple notes, so he'd be starting slow and deliberate.
It really goes without saying that any of the pieces that are too difficult for the OP based on comparisons with his first post become much easier when played at a slower than standard speed. I don't think the OP is looking for a piece that he has to play quite a bit below desired speed in order to be able to play it.

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
It really goes without saying that any of the pieces that are too difficult for the OP based on comparisons with his first post become much easier when played at a slower than standard speed. I don't think the OP is looking for a piece that he has to play quite a bit below desired speed in order to be able to play it.
You develop speed by starting fairly slow and - eventually -, reach a decent speed.

As I said, I was at Grade 7 (= "intermediate" or "intermediate-advanced"........or even "beginner-intermediate" depending on your point of view) when I reached supersonic speed (about 760mph at sea level) - eventually.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but don't bite off more than you can chew.


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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
It really goes without saying that any of the pieces that are too difficult for the OP based on comparisons with his first post become much easier when played at a slower than standard speed. I don't think the OP is looking for a piece that he has to play quite a bit below desired speed in order to be able to play it.
You develop speed by starting fairly slow and - eventually -, reach a decent speed.

As I said, I was at Grade 7 (= "intermediate" or "intermediate-advanced"........or even "beginner-intermediate" depending on your point of view) when I reached supersonic speed (about 760mph at sea level) - eventually.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but don't bite off more than you can chew.
In that case, I think the OP should play the Chopin Etudes or, at an even slower speed, the Godowsky Studies on the Chopin Etudes. The OP wants to play a piece easier than the ones he originally mentioned and, so far, was most interested the Heller Etude which seems to be what he is looking for.

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In that case, I think the OP should play the Chopin Etudes or, at an even slower speed, the Godowsky Studies on the Chopin Etudes. The OP wants to play a piece easier than the ones he originally mentioned and, so far, was most interested the Heller Etude which seems to be what he is looking for.
The difference between Rainy Gardens (excuse my French) and Chopin etudes is that one has few notes with simple movements which one can use to develop the ability to play at speed, the other is complicated and finger-busting (excuse my English), and you need the requisite finger agility, independence and control before you can even play at a snail's pace (about 0.001 mph).......


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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
It really goes without saying that any of the pieces that are too difficult for the OP based on comparisons with his first post become much easier when played at a slower than standard speed. I don't think the OP is looking for a piece that he has to play quite a bit below desired speed in order to be able to play it.
You develop speed by starting fairly slow and - eventually -, reach a decent speed.

As I said, I was at Grade 7 (= "intermediate" or "intermediate-advanced"........or even "beginner-intermediate" depending on your point of view) when I reached supersonic speed (about 760mph at sea level) - eventually.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but don't bite off more than you can chew.


The OP was specific about the difficulty level he was looking for. Perhaps hr wanted lsomething he can learn more quickly


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In that case, I think the OP should play the Chopin Etudes or, at an even slower speed, the Godowsky Studies on the Chopin Etudes. The OP wants to play a piece easier than the ones he originally mentioned and, so far, was most interested the Heller Etude which seems to be what he is looking for.
The difference between Rainy Gardens (excuse my French) and Chopin etudes is that one has few notes with simple movements which one can use to develop the ability to play at speed, the other is complicated and finger-busting (excuse my English), and you need the requisite finger agility, independence and control before you can even play at a 's pace (about 0.001 mph).......
My suggestion of the Chopin Etudes was not serious. It was meant to show that the idea of choosing a piece and just playing it much slower than usual is not reasonable, particularly in terms of what the OP asked for. All the qualities you mentioned for the Chopin Etudes are also needed for Gardens in the Rain but at a generally lower level. The piece is WAY beyond what the OP asked for.

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I've got a great piece. Stop fighting please.

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laugh ha


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