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[quote=MarkL] Mine draws 4 amps in dehumidify mode and takes out 30 pints per day, so it's more efficient than the older free standing dehumidifiers that I've used in the past.

MarkL, you say yours takes away 30 pints (17 litres) per day???? Do you mean it's capable of that or do you have a river running through your piano room šŸ¤Ŗ I jest, but also i am genuinely interested how often others have to empty theirs and the quantities.
Just for comparison my floor standing dehumidifier is currently filling it's 2.5 liter container every 6 days. It took 8 days last time as the temperature cooled for a week or so. Next week it'll be be put straight to the drain for convenience.

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The fan or compressor can vibrate and become noisy if the mounting brackets or screws for the fan motor or compressor are loose. Remove the dehumidifier from the wall outlet and tighten any loose screws on the components. If all of the screws and brackets are tight, the fan or compressor may need to be replaced. The models are very quiet though, you can check this list of the best dehumidifiers on dehumidifiercritic, you can pick one from there if you want a good one.

Last edited by sahel; 09/13/21 03:28 PM.
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The most powerful one I had was in Dujiangyan, which is fairly humid. It would extract several bucketfuls each day. If I was away for a period I would rig it to discharge straight into a drain.


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Originally Posted by busa
[quote=MarkL] I jest, but also i am genuinely interested how often others have to empty theirs and the quantities.
Just for comparison my floor standing dehumidifier is currently filling it's 2.5 liter container every 6 days. It took 8 days last time as the temperature cooled for a week or so. Next week it'll be be put straight to the drain for convenience.

I have a high efficiency and quiet free standing one as well. 2.5l container fills up anywhere from once a day to once every five or six days depending on conditions, in theory it can extract 12l per day.

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Originally Posted by ShiroKuro
Since this thread has been resurrected, I should give an update.

We had our crawlspace encapsulated in June. The crawlspace is directly below the room where the piano is. Our house basically sits half on the crawlspace and half on a full-height basement (which is a walk-out on the side opposite the crawlspace).

The crawlspace was just dirt floor. The basement solutions company lined the dirt floor, up the walls and all the posts (?? what are they called? support posts from the dirt to the floor), and sealed the vents (small "windows" that are let air in).

They also added a sump pump and perimeter drains.

And -- the most important part! -- install a whole-house AprilAire dehumidifier.

The result has been FANTASTIC!

Humidity control for the entire house is better, the basement (on the other side of the crawl space) is much nicer, not humid and no longer smells like a musty basement.

And the humidity on the main level, and in the piano room, is very consistent and definitely lower than it was last summer. And the AC doesn't have to work as hard.

Oh and the impact of the AprilAire on the electric bill is prety much non-existent.

This is best thing we could have done. I had no idea the results would be this good. It's amazing.

I'm going to have my tuner out in the fall at some point, but the piano is so stable, it's just a dream! smile

Last summer I was wondering if I should consider a dampchaser but now I know I won't need to.

thumb

ETA: btw back to the original topic: the AprilAire is not silent, but it is in the crawl space so it's not very noticeable. As I said, it's below the piano room, so sometimes I do hear it. But not at all while playing. And probably if you're sensitive to noises, you won't want it below your bedroom.

But it is much, much better than the freestanding dehumidifier which sounds like a jet airplane!

This clearly illustrates the fact that whole environment conditioning is certainly the "best" as it affects the entire structure. Unfortunately a high % of people just cannot accomplish this easily, therefore the DC system (with cover) is the next best option. Where applicable, the rods alone (with control of course) also works quite well.

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If people are having a hard time controlling humidity levels in their home I would check the weatherstripping and seals around windows and doors and if that doesn't help consider the crawlspace.

If in the US in the northern states the crawlspace vents would probably be a good idea to remain open throughout the seasons but if you live in the Southeast or any state with high humidity the latest research shows those vents are not a good idea. Theoretically they are there to create good cross ventilation to keep the crawlspace dry but since the advent of central air conditioning in states such as Florida, Georgia, Louisiana for example those vents actually forced hot humid air into the cooler crawlspace environment and allows for condensation and increased humidity. They recommend now encapsulating the crawlspace with active dehumidification.

With a little online research this is a very easy project for anyone to do assuming you have somewhat easy access to your crawlspace and there is room for you move around. For those interested here's a simple outline of what I did to encapsulate my crawlspace. This is a project you can really do by yourself and save yourself thousands of dollars in the process. I did this work a little at a time over the course of one summer. You can do it over a couple of weekends if you work fast and had help.

First you want to seal any cracks or gaps in your crawl space around doors, vents, pipes, electric conduit or anywhere there is penetration into the crawlspace. Seal that with Loctite foam. This stuff: Loctite Foam

I would also seal the area along the perimeter of the subflooring where it meets the walls of your home. Though there should insulation there it is often times not adequate and there is gaps in the subflooring where air from the crawlspace is entering your home. This is not good for your health anyway as mold, allergens, and gases such Radon can potentially enter your living space along with humid air.

There should also may be insulation under your subflooring and in-between the joists. If it's not there you might want to consider hiring a contractor for that or add some yourself if you find areas that are not well insulated. I just purchased batts of roll up insulation and used insulation wire to prop it up against the subflooring.

I then purchased rolls of 6mm polyethylene sheeting for a vapor barrier and placed it on the dirt floor and just taped it all together at the seams with sheathing tape overlapping by about 5 inches.

This stuff: Sheathing tape
and this stuff: vapor barrier

I ran the sheets up the walls and columns of my home about a 2 feet off the ground and attached the sheets to the crawlspace walls with acoustic glue. There are videos online on how to attach the vapor barrier to the columns. It's pretty easy but any method could work.
This stuff: acoustic glue

Before I glued the sheeting to the perimeter walls I poured a line of diamataceous earth for termite and pest control where the groundfloor meets the crawlspace floor. This stuff is nontoxic but it does kill any insect that crawls over it over time.

I then painted the crawlspace walls with Drylok waterproofer. The recommended course is to actually use foam insulation along the walls but since my crawlspace is above grade and I wanted to hang things like shelvings and kayak supports along the walls I kept them bare.

The next step would be to close off the vents leading to the outside of the home but do it in such a way that if I wanted to open them again it would be an easy task. Meaning DON'T SPRAY FOAM SEALER into the crawl space vents like my neighbor did in his garage. He had to remove that stuff when he sold his home so that the next owner could get it insured. I simply used Pink Pather project size pink insulation (This stuff foam board)and cut them to cover the vents from inside the crawlspace attaching them to the crawlspace walls with this stuff: Loctite foam board adhesive. You can't use regular sealant as it will melt the foamboard. My vents double up as flood vents and if there was ever a flood in my area the water pressure would easily break through this foam board and allow the vents to operate as they normally would.

The final step was to add a dehumidifier and find a way to drain the excess water from the drip pan. I suspended a Santa Fe compact 70 using a hanging kit from Santa Fe. As long as the dehumidifier is hung higher than the drain line exit points the water will drain. Most crawlspaces should have an entry door or vent. In my case I had a walk through large aluminum vent/hatch that allowed entry into my crawlspace. I had a plastics company fabricate me a thick plastic door the same size as that vent and I attached it with wing nuts to the preexisting bolts. I also weather stripped this door. (I saved the vent if ever I had to replace it again or for insurance inspections) I then drilled a 1/4 hole in the bottom section of the door and stuck the drain line through that. Voila my drainage challenge resolved! I installed clear strip doors to maintain the humidity levels in the crawlspace since I often go down there to retrieve household items like my kayaks. This stuff: strip door

This set up maintains my crawlspace at 44% humidity throughout the entire year whereas in years past it would go as high as 85% especially in the summer. I have an back up indoor dehumidifier in the piano room set at 45% humidity and it has never gone on in over a year whereas in years past if would turn on and off every few minutes or so. That's how much humidity can enter your home from the crawlspace in the Southeast and my house is relatively new and well constructed. The crawlspace dehumidifier only turns on at certain times of the day when it expected for RH to rise in the crawlspace. Overall though it is pretty air tight and stable.

The added benefit of this encapsulation is that it saves your floor joists and subflooring, (Our subdivisions clubhouse subflooring and joists had to replaced after 20 years due to wood rot). The dry air prevents ants and termites from entering your home as they are attracted to moist environments. It protects your home from radon gases entering the living space. You have extra storage space ( a big plus) and finally your piano is protected.

Last edited by Jethro; 09/14/21 03:55 PM.

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Originally Posted by P W Grey
This clearly illustrates the fact that whole environment conditioning is certainly the "best" as it affects the entire structure. Unfortunately a high % of people just cannot accomplish this easily...

Yes, for example if someone rents there home, or if there are other factors that make the whole-house treatments difficult or expensive. In those situations, a damp chaser is probably cheaper as well.

Jethro's DIY is commendable, but no way could we have done that, nor would we have wanted to. Our crawlspace is too tight in some spots, and pre-encapsulation was just yucky. But more to the point, in our case, the drain for the dehumidifier and sump pump needed to be done by pros. And the sump pump esp. is part of what made it expensive.

But for us it was definitely money well spent! smile


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