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Because I record and also film for youtube I have to set up two seperate devices. My movie camera has gone bad so now I film using my i-phone. I use my computer, mixer and dual mics to record the sound then mix the whole shebang on i-movie. Life would be so much easier if I just recorded but I really do enjoy making the videos. So what I usually do is set everything up and play. Very rarely will I go with the first take (although in this upcoming recital I actually did). I usually find that the first take in the morning is the freshest and most honest but will also have more mistakes. The later takes may have less mistakes but may not sound as fresh. I usually end up with three or more takes and decide on which ever one feels best. There is no "perfect", never has been and never will be.

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So long as it is an accurate representation of how I can usually play the piece on a good day, is what I'd be aiming for.

a) Do you play until there was a little mistake and then start over, because you want to have the perfect recording?

Yes, If I can consistently play with no mistakes, there should be none in the recording.

b) Do you play the entire piece and accept little bloops here and there, but only in case of a fatal mistake you start over?

Yes, if I usually have small slips but should not have fatal flaws.

c) Do you play the entire piece and take the 1st recording because it is what is is and this is closest to a live session?


Less likely, but possibly if the recording is reasonable and is a complicated recording process with video, audio, mixing like my process sometimes seems, but overall the recording I can live with.

d) Or is your playing that secure that the 1st attempt is perfect, anyway cool


If you have something that is very secure and you can consistently play it without any mistakes, and the difference between iterations are so minor that no one would notice, then yes, even this one is possible. Not usually the case with recital material and very unlikely you could do this with everything you record and if you can, you're probably not stretching enough.

Any one could apply, but it's usually B, for me.

Last edited by Greener; 08/10/21 04:58 PM.
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It was really fun to read your answers, I find my own thougths so many times.
Good to know I am not alone with screwing up the last bars. But this is Murphys Law: the last bar often are musical fireworks and therefore challenging.
Good to know I am not alone with stopping playing after a few bars if I think I can do it better - or because of a silly mistake. Throwing away only a few seconds of playing time doesn't count it as attempt. whistle
Overall it seems as there is a transition over time from trying to make a perfect recording (beginners) to accepting it never happens and live with a good one (experienced). And the better the player, the less attempts are needed anyway. Interestingly nobody said option D: (1st attempt is perfect, anyway). Seems that everyone has a kind of over-critical self awareness.

Originally Posted by Animisha
However, once I have made a recording that is almost, almost as good as I want it to be, it is hard, because while playing the piece one more time, I often find myself thinking that I played better on the previous recording and then it feels meaningless to finish the piece.
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Also, after I have one complete play through without major errors I think: "if I mess up then I can always use that take". That makes me more relaxed and I can usually play better after that.
Yes, I faced both ideas at the same time.
I will add a 3rd option: Have an almost perfect go (expression and so), but make a fatal mistake near the end. In this case all other future recordings are doomed to be that good, just without that mistake. This is the worst situation in my head. The only thing that is taking pressure from me is to know, I need only a good ending and I could cheat and cut both attempts into one single video. With two cameras it's easy, just do it by switching between them.

And I don't fall back to an earlier good attempt. Because this means all later attempts are just lost time. And I hate it to search through my video-files. Throwing away the earlier attempts is easy, I count them as practice. Until now, my final take was always the last attempt, even if it wasn't the best. Anyway: what is the best one? Having good expression and fun listening to it or have it error free but sounding mechanical dead? For me it's a compromise leaning towards expression and the errors must be acceptable.

Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
A beginner piece usually don't need too many retakes.
I'll see with October recital
Originally Posted by Animisha
Unless you are a beginner of course... whistle
grin thumb (btw: thanks for the themed recital idea, this is a great one!)

And here remains the obvious thing: The more experience one has, the more secure the playing is, the less attempts are required. And the strategy changes over time. I agree to Jason's approach playing only 3 attempts because after that it gets worse. But for beginners this probably won't work - we simply need more time and more luck.


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Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
And here remains the obvious thing: The more experience one has, the more secure the playing is, the less attempts are required. And the strategy changes over time.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way because as you get more advanced the pieces get longer and more difficult. Imagine messing up at the end of a 10-minute sonata movement. 😫

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The 1 thing that online tutorials talk about is starting a piece at different bars instead of always at the beginning of a section. Even if you miss 1 note, you know the next starting point is just around the corner.

The first and last thing is to make regular recordings. Isolate your problems and work on them individually. If you miss the same spot a few times, sit down and analyze your playing. Replay the same notes in slow motion and try a few ways to see if you can find a better way to play the same spot. If you keep playing the same spot the same way 100x is not going to make your playing improve.

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Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
And here remains the obvious thing: The more experience one has, the more secure the playing is, the less attempts are required. And the strategy changes over time.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way because as you get more advanced the pieces get longer and more difficult. Imagine messing up at the end of a 10-minute sonata movement. 😫
Good the recitals are more or less limited to 7 minutes. wink
(Something with a maximum mp3 file size and with a typical bitrate. Didn't control the math, but I guess it's right.)


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Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
And here remains the obvious thing: The more experience one has, the more secure the playing is, the less attempts are required. And the strategy changes over time.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way because as you get more advanced the pieces get longer and more difficult. Imagine messing up at the end of a 10-minute sonata movement. 😫
Good the recitals are more or less limited to 7 minutes. wink
(Something with a maximum mp3 file size and with a typical bitrate. Didn't control the math, but I guess it's right.)

I've done longer. It's hard to predict mp3 size until you do the conversion. You can always reduce the bit rate to get a smaller file. Nobody can tell the difference anyway, since there are so many variables that affect our non-professional recordings.

Sam

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Originally Posted by Sam S
Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by Wie Waldi
And here remains the obvious thing: The more experience one has, the more secure the playing is, the less attempts are required. And the strategy changes over time.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way because as you get more advanced the pieces get longer and more difficult. Imagine messing up at the end of a 10-minute sonata movement. 😫
Good the recitals are more or less limited to 7 minutes. wink
(Something with a maximum mp3 file size and with a typical bitrate. Didn't control the math, but I guess it's right.)

I've done longer. It's hard to predict mp3 size until you do the conversion. You can always reduce the bit rate to get a smaller file. Nobody can tell the difference anyway, since there are so many variables that affect our non-professional recordings.

Sam

I've found on my Zoom h4n recorder that if I record at a 44.1 kHz sample rate and a 16 bit depth, I can fit a 20 minute performance into the maximum allowed mp3 size of 20 MB.

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