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#3141842 07/30/21 11:34 AM
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Not sure if this was ever discussed or even worth talking about. But, does this idea make any sense?
Our right hand develops more control and sensitivity due to the written nature of most music.
Of course, the graded action plays a part in this. Heavier in bass and lighter in treble.
So, personally my left hand does not play with the ease or sensitivity of my right.
I imagine that many experience the same.

Does it not make sense, for those wishing to develop equal control of the hands to have a reverse keyboard
with the pitch higher to the left and lower on right and graded action reversed as well?
If one practiced on such a keyboard would you not develop a better touch in the left hand with more control?
So going back to play on the standard piano I wonder how much better the left hand could play, even though the graded action changes?

Wonder if this would also help performing or memorizing a piece. I know people can use mirroring technic to help learn difficult passages.

I think I might have read someone might of made an acoustic piano like this for someone in the past, but I don't see info on it.

Anyway, thanks for pondering this idea.

Thoughts?

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There was a fairly recent post about a ‘left hand’ pisno. Maybe someone remembers where.
I would personally find it to be dizzing, to read the treble score on the top but look for the notes in the bass section of the keyboard.

Want to work on your LH? Learn some music for LH alone.


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There was a discussion about such a piano. However, for most of us the challenges would be formidable.

First, there is the undoubtedly considerable cost of investing in such a piano for what might be very limited use.

The physical and mental challenges of playing on such a piano would be not only "dizzying" but almost insurmountable compared to the relative ease of working on repertoire to improve left hand facility and agility on a normal piano.

The human brain (of some) may be more adaptable than I think, but I can't envisage looking at a score where the melody rises in the right hand and playing it in the left hand, where through years of conditioning, we conceive the left hand "descending" the keyboard as it moves further from the centre.

Not for the faint of heart!

Regards,


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Originally Posted by joggerjazz
Not sure if this was ever discussed or even worth talking about. But, does this idea make any sense?
Our right hand develops more control and sensitivity due to the written nature of most music.
Of course, the graded action plays a part in this. Heavier in bass and lighter in treble.
So, personally my left hand does not play with the ease or sensitivity of my right.
I imagine that many experience the same.



Thoughts?
If you never play Bach or Mozart and/or play mostly pop or jazz, and don't play scales & arpeggios etc in both hands, I imagine your LH would be underdeveloped.

That is not usually a problem with classical pianists who follow a graded exam syllabus, and I've never encountered it myself, either when I was a student, or now as a teacher.

The solution surely would be to start playing piano/keyboard music that requires both hands to be used equally, like Two-Part Inventions, as well as play LH pieces (there are lots of them), and scales & arpeggios, of course - not change the piano.

BruceD #3141890 07/30/21 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by BruceD
The physical and mental challenges of playing on such a piano would be not only "dizzying" but almost insurmountable compared to the relative ease of working on repertoire to improve left hand facility and agility on a normal piano.
,

Bruce captures my opinion exactly. It seems like a lot of work and expense when you can simply work on increasing the sensitivity and agility of your left hand. Left hand pieces such as the Bach/Brahms Chaconne will help. Pieces with lots of hand crossing and pieces with inner voices within the same hand will also increase your sensitivity. Practicing left hand exercises, scales and arpeggios while playing crescendos, decrescendos, alternate rhythms and alternate agogics will help. Ghosting will help - meaning, you play the left hand normally while you play the right hand silently. You don't say what kind of instrument you are playing, but if you have access to a concert grand, the bass voices are much fuller and louder. Practicing on one requires you to make subtle adjustments so you don't overwhelm the treble.

It all comes down to experience. The more you practice, the better you get.


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Originally Posted by liliboulanger
If you never play Bach or Mozart and/or play mostly pop or jazz, and don't play scales & arpeggios etc in both hands, I imagine your LH would be underdeveloped.

That is not usually a problem with classical pianists who follow a graded exam syllabus, and I've never encountered it myself, either when I was a student, or now as a teacher.

The solution surely would be to start playing piano/keyboard music that requires both hands to be used equally, like Two-Part Inventions, as well as play LH pieces (there are lots of them), and scales & arpeggios, of course - not change the piano.

Of course I play the traditional rudiments scales, arps, etc. The 2 part inventions definitely help but for me the left hand is not equal to my right. Hand anatomy is reverse. Why wouldn't the left hand benefit from some practice with this idea? Brain wise, yes a challenge.
Mainly I'd think you'd be giving the LH a chance to experience the opportunity to play lighter, faster and develop reaction time that you can't get in a normal piano. And when going back to play a normal piano, that freedom will help your LH playing.

Yes, working on LH material on normal piano helps, but what percent of pianists can say their LH is equal to their RH when so much piano music lends the LH to a more supporting role of the RH?

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Originally Posted by joggerjazz
[...] when so much piano music lends the LH to a more supporting role of the RH?

That being the case, why work to excess what you don't normally need?

As an amateur, I have played music from Bach to Gershwin and much (or some) of many composers in between, and the relative lack of agility in the left hand when compared to that in the right has never been a deterrent to success with the literature.

Regards,


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There are probably more right-handed people. RH tends to play the melody (higher notes) while LH plays a supporting role like chords. The expressive part of playing goes to the RH. If you’re playing a Bach fugue or Invention, the melodic lines are distributed evenly for both hands.

When practicing LH, we can take the RH part of a piece and do it LH.

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Originally Posted by joggerjazz
Mainly I'd think you'd be giving the LH a chance to experience the opportunity to play lighter, faster and develop reaction time that you can't get in a normal piano.
In terms of reaction time, I'd say my LH is at least as good as my RH - partly because so much Romantic music (which these days make up the bulk of my rep) requires very rapid and accurate wide leaps in LH: everything from Chopin waltzes (think, for example, Op.70/1) to a lot of Rachmaninov.

In fact, just about the only stuff my RH can play better than my LH are very rapid repeated notes (think Alborada del gracioso, Scarbo, Kk141), as there isn't much music that requires the LH to play them.


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Yes, working on LH material on normal piano helps, but what percent of pianists can say their LH is equal to their RH when so much piano music lends the LH to a more supporting role of the RH?
Again, as liliboulanger hinted, that depends on how you have been taught, and what sort of music you've learnt - or had to learn - during your student years (assuming you're no longer a student).

When I was a student, it never once occurred to me that there might be some things that my RH could (certainly not 'should') do better than my LH: after all, everything I learnt - e.g. one-handed scales in major thirds and chromatic minor thirds, or in octaves - had to be played equally well in either hand, and the pieces usually reflected that too - including of course the WTC.


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play some Scriabin


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If you are really serious, this could probably "easily" be done with an electronic keyboard with a midi output - remap the keys. You would also have to shift and lose some range since the C would need to be to the left of the 3 black keys, not the 2 black keys. Mirrored. Now my head hurts... Not worth the trouble!

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Here's a way, for all practical purposes of left hand development, to reverse the keyboard for selected passages when you practice.


Sam S #3142043 07/31/21 03:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Sam S
If you are really serious, this could probably "easily" be done with an electronic keyboard with a midi output - remap the keys. You would also have to shift and lose some range since the C would need to be to the left of the 3 black keys, not the 2 black keys. Mirrored. Now my head hurts... Not worth the trouble!

Sam
Years ago I did just that, obviously not effecting the key weight. It was kinda fun. What was more useful was making the touch really light so that anything less than an accurate touch produced an FF.


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