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#3139211 07/20/21 10:41 AM
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Hi All,

I am trying to play a piece of music (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1m9hoph30CtN6QVJPO0X5GIHC4yoAn18T/view?usp=sharing) and am not able to play the encircled part correctly.

In the music, there is no rest between first and second measures. When I play the last two notes in the treble clef (G and A), I should immediately play G again in the next measure. I am not able to achieve this while playing with both hands. A gap always comes before I can play G in the second measure. This completely ruins the song. I can only play properly with right hand. This pattern repeats itself for some measures, and the result is same.

How do I practice this?

Thanks,
Manish


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Well done for recognising that the G in the second bar has to be played without a gap that a bar line often causes. Is it not a matter of fingering the last full beat of the first bar and the first beat of the second ? In the right hand 1 and 4 on the C and G landing on the fifth for the A, then use 4 on the G second bar. In the left hand 5 and 2 on the C and G and expand the hand to take the first chord in the second bar with 5,2 and 1. Slow practice at first and you will get the hang of it.

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Hi! 2 questions:
1. Distribution of notes between hands, as written?
2.What is the fingering in the right hand?

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Originally Posted by ManishP
Hi All,

I am trying to play a piece of music (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1m9hoph30CtN6QVJPO0X5GIHC4yoAn18T/view?usp=sharing) and am not able to play the encircled part correctly.

In the music, there is no rest between first and second measures. When I play the last two notes in the treble clef (G and A), I should immediately play G again in the next measure. I am not able to achieve this while playing with both hands. A gap always comes before I can play G in the second measure. This completely ruins the song. I can only play properly with right hand. This pattern repeats itself for some measures, and the result is same.
Manish

Why can't you do it ? I mean what is happening ? Usually you should slow way down and isolate the particular spot where you are blocked. So you would put your finger on A and practice the chord change in LH. Then once that is well under control you would try to execute the changes both hands very very slowly, without any tempo, just the mouvement. And monitor/understand what is happening.


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At one time, you disclosed that you had a teacher.

If you still have one, I would suggest you present your questions to your teacher.

If that doesn't help you then get a different teacher.

Asking things here will get you all sorts of answers which likely will confuse you and make it appear much more difficult that it is.

You have been at this quite a while now (5 years ?) and your progress indicates that something might be wrong with your approach.

I would suggest a teacher and do only what your teacher asks you to do.

Good Luck


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What key are you in?

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Originally Posted by fatar760
What key are you in?

I'm curious to know what the time signature is. There is something very strange (wrong?) about the note values and their distribution with the measure.

Regards,


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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by fatar760
What key are you in?

I'm curious to know what the time signature is. There is something very strange (wrong?) about the note values and their distribution with the measure.

Regards,

I put it down to 4/4 but with a few typos. Looks like poorly notated free sheet music to me, which is often transcribed based on how it sounds than how practical it is to play.

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The upper voice should be easy to play legato. Start with just the upper note (G-A-G) without the C but with the LH bass using the proper fingering. Practice only the transition back and forth without regard to the tempo.

The more difficult part is to play the bass legato. Using the fingering 4-1 to 5-2-1 you can connect the bass note.

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Originally Posted by BruceD
I'm curious to know what the time signature is. There is something very strange (wrong?) about the note values and their distribution with the measure.
Indeed, good spot. It looks like it should be a syncopated rhythm with a tie over the middle of the measure. As written it would be 3+3+2/8, a rather odd meter.

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Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by BruceD
I'm curious to know what the time signature is. There is something very strange (wrong?) about the note values and their distribution with the measure.
Indeed, good spot. It looks like it should be a syncopated rhythm with a tie over the middle of the measure. As written it would be 3+3+2/8, a rather odd meter.

The entire Bass Clef (assuming it's bass clef) is in 4/4. The syncopation is a pretty standard bossa-type pattern which repeats.

The issues occur when you look at how the Treble Clef adds up - measure 2, for instance, adds up to two different amounts (4 beats in bass and 4 1/2 beats in the treble). It's full of errors and isn't worth the practise time, I'd say.

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You are not describing clearly what your issue is.


I suspect that you keep too much pressure on the hand. I guess that you play top notes g-a-g with 4-5-4
Try this exercise: keep the thumb on 1 down on the C, and play slowly G-A-G with 4-5-4. I suspect you have trouble with the 5 to 4. This happens if you don't release the tension on the 5. Try releasing the tension immediately after pressing 5. There are even special exercises to practice just the immediate release of tension, I saw some on youtube some time ago.
You can make up variants of this exercise, eg keep also 5 down while repeatedly playing 4. Try to feel what it is that blocks you playing the 4 in time.



The dotted half-note in measure 2 is 1/8 too long. I guess this is just a 'convenience' notation.


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@ManishP - Perhaps you could try an experiment that would help diagnose why you are having the problem. Let's focus on just the first two measures.

Try playing just the "outer voices", hand separately first, then together.
Use the same fingers you have been using trying to play the whole chord.

So: RH would be G-G-G G-A | G-F-F
LH would be C -- C C | Bb Bb

Let us know how it goes if you try it.


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Originally Posted by dmd
At one time, you disclosed that you had a teacher.
If you still have one, I would suggest you present your questions to your teacher.
If that doesn't help you then get a different teacher.
Asking things here will get you all sorts of answers which likely will confuse you and make it appear much more difficult that it is.
Dismissing a teacher because they cannot help you solve one problem is far too extreme. It that's a recurring situation, then one should consider getting a new teacher.
Although it's certainly true that asking a question can lead to multiple and sometimes conflicting answers, I don't think that means people shouldn't ask questions. Getting different answers is the nature of any forum. Were the tens of thousands of questions asked about performance all inappropriate for anyone with a teacher?

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Firstly, thanks to everyone for such quick and enthusiastic responses.

To answer all questions:

1. I do not have a teacher. I tried a couple, could not work out. I will probably try again sometime soon.
2. The song is in the key of F, 120 BPM. Time signature is 4/4.
3. The sheet music you see is from Synthesia - I have now replaced it with the portion from the original sheet music (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1d5F7lagz85HfMYnkH4oD57HhUyNnURfa/view?usp=sharing). I am practicing both along with Synthesia and independent of it.
4.

Originally Posted by Sidokar
Why can't you do it ? I mean what is happening ? Usually you should slow way down and isolate the particular spot where you are blocked. So you would put your finger on A and practice the chord change in LH. Then once that is well under control you would try to execute the changes both hands very very slowly, without any tempo, just the movement. And monitor/understand what is happening.

Because I think I become slow when moving from one chord to the other.

I think my linking the sheet music to the Synthesia rendition caused many confusions - sorry about that.


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If you play with the pedal, the pedal will hold the last C chord for you, you needn't hold it with your fingers. Release your fingers from the last C chord right after playing it and move your fingers to the Bb chord in advance.

And even if you play without pedal, release your fingers from the last C chord a little bit earlier than it is indicated in notation in order to have sufficient time to move your fingers to Bb chord in time. Playing Bb chord in time is much more important than holding previous C chord.

Of course at the same time you need to practice changing from one chord to the other as quickly as possible. LH alone. But it requires much time to learn to do it really fast.

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Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
And even if you play without pedal, release your fingers from the last C chord a little bit earlier than it is indicated in notation in order to have sufficient time to move your fingers to Bb chord in time. Playing Bb chord in time is much more important than holding previous C chord.

That is exactly what I want to do, but always end up playing both chord and melody together, rather than moving my left hand to Bb slightly before RH play. And of course, I do want to build skill of moving faster to Bb, but it is not happening. I guess it just needs more practice?


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Originally Posted by ManishP
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
And even if you play without pedal, release your fingers from the last C chord a little bit earlier than it is indicated in notation in order to have sufficient time to move your fingers to Bb chord in time. Playing Bb chord in time is much more important than holding previous C chord.

That is exactly what I want to do, but always end up playing both chord and melody together, rather than moving my left hand to Bb slightly before RH play. And of course, I do want to build skill of moving faster to Bb, but it is not happening. I guess it just needs more practice?
So your problem is preparing the left hand chord ahead of playing it? To practice that the best exercise is as follows:

1. Pause just before the last C chord of the bar until you have the B-flat chord clearly in your mind.
2. Play the C chord and immediately move your hand over the B-flat chord of the next measure but pause before playing it. You can't allow yourself to hesitate in mid air or move slowly between positions.
3. Play the rest of the measure normally.

Practice this with the left hand only and then do the same hands together. After you can do this confidently you should hold the chord a little longer.

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Originally Posted by ManishP
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
And even if you play without pedal, release your fingers from the last C chord a little bit earlier than it is indicated in notation in order to have sufficient time to move your fingers to Bb chord in time. Playing Bb chord in time is much more important than holding previous C chord.

That is exactly what I want to do, but always end up playing both chord and melody together, rather than moving my left hand to Bb slightly before RH play.
I guess it's because you try to play it fast. You need to practice it very slowly first and then increase tempo gradually.

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Until we see a video of ManishP's hand, including the wrist, we cannot accurately assess and advise.

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