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Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by dire tonic
Nahum, what has been your own involvement, over the years, in pop music? Were you, for example, in any pop bands? Have you spent any time professionally as a pop musician?
There is a lot to tell; suffice it to mention that before moving to Israel, I played almost only pop in restaurant and club bands; the truth is, I did it more instinctively. When I started playing in Platina fusion group, there was also Alona Tourel, a professional pop pianist, most in demand in recording studios, with experience in New York. Playing with her, it was easy to learn what she was doing.
Also, for 10 years I was a companion in a pop-only wedding band; and within this framework I transcribed a lot of music from the recordings quite accurately, including the piano and keyboards. The best school: transcription in the morning, playing in the evening.

The best school? It depends what you're trying to learn. Having a good ear, being able to transcribe, can be a useful starting point - and decidedly useful for party gigs, weddings and the like, but if you have no real affinity or love of the music you're transcribing then it's a somewhat passive means of earning a living. I spent most of my time in the studio but I'd occasionally pick up a party gig playing a mixture of pop and requests. Drummers and bass players were the most clued in on then-current trends in pop but relatively few side players were enthusiastic, finding the hits musically 'too simple'.

For pop, the better school is in the creation of the music itself, understanding its tropes through the means of production in the recording studio (which, for most pop, is where it all happens!) where engineers, producers, artists and the musicians who are specialists in their field will all meet.

I don't know if you're aware of the Discogs database. It's the largest index of popular music with considerable detail on production and label credits. I traced you via Platina and found some recorded albums against your name, some Jazz and some vocal easy listening. You mention Alona Turel who has two listings but no pop to speak of. And while on the subject of Discogs, you've summarised your CV, here's mine.

The risk of being dogmatic was raised earlier. I want to stress how important it is to keep flexible in one's way of thinking, to be as open as possible to the widest variety of advice we offer. Modern solo pop piano is a pursuit in its infancy without even competing templates for study. While we may be able to offer constructive suggestions, no one can honestly put forward definitive answers to beginners' questions. We shouldn't pretend we can.

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Originally Posted by dire tonic
The best school? It depends what you're trying to learn. Having a good ear, being able to transcribe, can be a useful starting point - and decidedly useful for party gigs, weddings and the like, but if you have no real affinity or love of the music you're transcribing then it's a somewhat passive means of earning a living.
dire tonic, you shoot in a different direction than me. You studied classical music (hopefully), including the music of Bach; but was your goal in the future to write and perform your music in the style of Bach ("For (pop) music, the better school is in the creation of the music itself, understanding its tropes through the means of production in the recording studio , which, for most pop, is where it all happens!) ? Do you think that the main goal of 100% of students is to achieve what you demonstrate with your links?
My practice shows - no. Students in this early stage are not targeting the studio or video recordings ; they want to learn how to INTERPRET the comps of different songs in different rhythms and different harmonies in a solo playing or with an ensemble. In college, my curriculum is around the piano. In addition, there are courses in harmony, arrangement, songwriting, a number of workshops in the genres of Israeli pop, western pop and rock, oriental music, jazz (a lot of swing pop) and more. My task: to give the student such skills that he fits into the framework of the group; and could also play alone, or a duet with vocals. The results confirm the teaching concept: the pianistic requirements of the performance of pop music, as much as possible, at the classical level.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
I have had it for many years. It is written very cleverly: at first it slaps at a slow pace, and then the rhythmic figures become clear. But that's not all - while gradually accelerating, super patterns are suddenly discovered that spread over several bars.

I'm sorry, Nahum, but none of this is accurate.

It does not start at any kind of pace or reveal rhythmic figures in a gradual way - it's pretty much straight in at the nuts and bolts (I hope you understand that expression) and then moves on to different note values and combinations.

What is a 'super pattern'? It sounds like a colourful expression without any real meaning. Hyperbole, maybe?

Finally, the book does not indicate any 'acceleration' in tempi. In fact, a brief read of the preface says "The speed of the exercises is determined by the ability of the student". There are zero tempo indications in any of the exercises.

I honestly read your statement thinking you were just describing a generic method book. Maybe re-open your copy and have another read.


Originally Posted by Nahum
However, it was precisely in this book that I understood the problematic nature of reading the rhythm recorded in the form of a series of attacks — that which claps produce; therefore there is no difference between fourth, eighth, sixteenth and syncopation. This is the thinking of a drummer, and I played the violin and saxophone, where rhythmic thinking goes through the duration of breathing, that is, prosody.


The book is designed to help drummers/musos (they can be the same...sometimes ha), recognise rhythmic patterns. They're not 'attacks'. How someone decides to shape the rhythmic phrase is what we call musicality and can involve any manner of note combinations, but we need to understand those patterns first. Everyone has different methods of working patterns out, and it's important that we help students find what works for them.


Originally Posted by Nahum
Yes, I made some exaggeration, but ... Ask those who studied classical piano in the 50s and 60s if they had printed sheet music for the music you mentioned, and did they work with the teacher on these songs during the lesson? I doubt it. During my studies in period of Soviet Union, such a request would undoubtedly have caused a worldwide scandal. At the same time, we all listened to Western European radio stations, and we played our memorized hits by ear.

Thank you for acknowledging your exaggeration. Although, I don't understand why you've brought classical pianists from the 50s and 60s into this conversation. We're talking about ways of learning and understanding rhythmic combinations.

I'm sure there were many pianists learning in that period who were influenced by the likes of Fats Waller, Dave Brubeck, Jelly Roll Morton, Count Basie, Duke Ellington and being subjected to countless syncopated rhythms and not the simple rhythmic patterns you cited with Moon River.


Originally Posted by Nahum
You have completely forgotten the revolution in the music mass media, which was made by MTV channel . The number of kids who wanted to play "Billie Jean" by Michael Jackson was many times more than those who wanted to play "Night and Day" by Cole Porter - different times! The impact of TV is many times stronger than radio; but have you watched MTV a lot yourself?

Do you think that it may be possible that between 1932 (Night and Day) and 1983 (Billie Jean), there may have been one, or two, more popular music influences to inspire young musical minds?

Did the Beatles not inspire? Billy Joel? Elton John? Ray Charles? Yes? The Who? Queen? Led Zep? Stevie Wonder? The whole Motown scene? Disco?

Have I watched MTV? Yes, MANY years ago and it's changed a lot since it first started. It's been a heck of a long time since MTV inspired anyone to pick up an instrument (IMO)


Originally Posted by Nahum
It is worth paying attention to the 5th paragraph of Takadimi's declared goals:

5. It should address rhythmic issues presented by musics
outside the realm of traditional tonal literature such as
asymmetric meters, modulation of meter or tempo, complex
syncopations, complex tuplet groupings, and passages that
combine these in novel and challenging ways.
( Takadimi: A Beat-Oriented System of
Rhythm Pedagogy
)

That's right, it's a system of rhythm pedagogy. There are many different systems and varying pedagogies that exist for many different disciplines. It's not a definitive system. It's a system that will work for some people, and not others - and that's okay.


Originally Posted by Nahum
The study of Takadimi is based on the basic skills of every normal person: sense of rhythm, breathing, pronunciation, memory for a small number of syllables; and in the end - bringing into coordination prosody and the movement of hands and fingers on the keyboard; which is much simpler than playing a piece, with different parts for each hand. But if someone wants to scratch his right ear behind with his left hand, then who can forbid him?

Believe it or not, the 'basic skills of every normal person', is not about moving one's hands, or fingers, on a keyboard. What even is 'normal'?


Originally Posted by Nahum
I don't have any degree in pop music or even jazz; maybe that's why I worked at the jazz department of the Jerusalem Academy for 33 years - until my retirement.

Well, anyone can get stuck in a department/academic bubble for a number of years, it's rarely a good thing. I wonder if the department you fronted would have been better served by someone with a true love, passion, understanding, and upbringing of jazz and pop music. As a student I'd find that inspiring.

I'm sure in all those years you may have once stated the idiom: 'self-praise is no praise', to an overzealous student. Regardless of whether you did or not, I offer it now as a humble phrase to keep in mind.


Originally Posted by dire tonic
I don't know if you're aware of the Discogs database. It's the largest index of popular music with considerable detail on production and label credits. I traced you via Platina and found some recorded albums against your name, some Jazz and some vocal easy listening. You mention Alona Turel who has two listings but no pop to speak of. And while on the subject of Discogs, you've summarised your CV, here's mine.

Great CV dire tonic, and I also checked out your YouTube clips earlier today. Very nice playing!

Staying on the subject of pop music, Nahum, I'd like to ask your opinion on some piano tracks I made and uploaded to this site a couple of months ago. I was asking about tips to work out a good pop piano accompaniment. You very kindly offered some advice early in the discussion, but I was surprised you offered no opinion on how you'd improve the tracks.

The thread is here:

http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthre...omp-with-pop-rock-songs.html#Post3122911

If you have a chance, please do have a listen and let me know what you'd do to improve the rhythmic groove between my hands, and what you'd do differently to embody the spirit of the song.


Originally Posted by dire tonic
The risk of being dogmatic was raised earlier. I want to stress how important it is to keep flexible in one's way of thinking, to be as open as possible to the widest variety of advice we offer. Modern solo pop piano is a pursuit in its infancy without even competing templates for study. While we may be able to offer constructive suggestions, no one can honestly put forward definitive answers to beginners' questions. We shouldn't pretend we can.

I wholeheartedly agree with this - it's so important (as I've previously said), to acknowledge that not everyone learns in the same way and to be effective educators we must prioritise the student's needs and have enough ploys up our sleeves to help where possible.

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Hi

Quote
I wonder if the department you fronted would have been better served by someone with a true love, passion, understanding, and upbringing of jazz and pop music.

Who are you to question Nahum's love for music, or indeed anyone's? From what I've read over the years Nahum has a better understanding of music than the vast majority of people on this forum. I'm equally sure his love for music is without question. As far as I know music has been his whole life, as a professional Jazz Pianist and a Teacher.

And then you have the cheek to ask for his advice.

Good luck with that.


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Originally Posted by Simon_b
Hi

Quote
I wonder if the department you fronted would have been better served by someone with a true love, passion, understanding, and upbringing of jazz and pop music.

Who are you to question Nahum's love for music, or indeed anyone's? From what I've read over the years Nahum has a better understanding of music than the vast majority of people on this forum. I'm equally sure his love for music is without question. As far as I know music has been his whole life, as a professional Jazz Pianist and a Teacher.

And then you have the cheek to ask for his advice.

Good luck with that.

Hey Simon,

You've taken the sentence out of context there. I'm not questioning anyone's love for anything, and sorry if it read like that. The point I was making was that a music department fronted by someone with ALL of those qualities would inspire me as a student. I've no doubt Nahum loves what he does to stay in a job for so long.

On your second point, I had actually asked for advice in the previous thread and was surprised when it wasn't forthcoming - given his contributions and apparent understanding of the genre:

" I didn’t take pop music to my classical lessons —- but I didn’t need to as I was capable of working on them without support"

"Alona Tourel, a professional pop pianist, most in demand in recording studios, with experience in New York. Playing with her, it was easy to learn what she was doing."


I'm always open to feedback as I believe it's how one progresses - I think it's important to have an open attitude as both a learner and as an educator. As someone who has worked (and still does) in many of London's top colleges the dogmatic approach just doesn't wash with students these days (if it ever did). So of course I will still ask for feedback, I do every day from many different sources (friends, family, colleagues, musical directors, piano professors etc.)

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Edited to add (before the time expired):

I'm grateful my ego doesn't get in the way like it used to.

As Andrew Lippa said to me the other day 'hear as many opinions as you can, don't be dismissive, and work out what works for you'. Sage advice I feel.

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Originally Posted by fatar760
I'm sorry, Nahum, but none of this is accurate.

It does not start at any kind of pace or reveal rhythmic figures in a gradual way - it's pretty much straight in at the nuts and bolts (I hope you understand that expression)
Never met; maybe a demonstration of the internal screws of a mechanism?


Quote
What is a 'super pattern'? It sounds like a colourful expression without any real meaning. Hyperbole, maybe?
Finally, the book does not indicate any 'acceleration' in tempi. In fact, a brief read of the preface says "The speed of the exercises is determined by the ability of the student". There are zero tempo indications in any of the exercises.

I honestly read your statement thinking you were just describing a generic method book. Maybe re-open your copy and have another read.




Based on exercise on p.5 , tempo - 92- 280 bpm.
It's about music ,not poking a drum,



Quote
The book is designed to help drummers/musos (they can be the same...sometimes ha), recognise rhythmic patterns.
On the title page is written FOR ALL INSTRUMENTS . There are specific tutorials for drummers, for example by Ted Reed.


Quote
They're not 'attacks'.
Attack The initiation of a sound. In terms of the four stages of a sound (Attack, Decay, Sustain and Release, or ADSR), a sound’s attack is the point where the sound begins and increases in volume to its peak. Hitting the table, clapping with two hands (Bellson's exercises are based on this) and snare , sound the beat, but not the duration of the note , as well as the duration of the pauses - this is what I see as a disadvantage of these exercises.




Quote
Do you think that it may be possible that between 1932 (Night and Day) and 1983 (Billie Jean), there may have been one, or two, more popular music influences to inspire young musical minds?
This is a superficial view. You, apparently, are unfamiliar with the terror of many teachers of classical music against "Yazz muzik" or against playing with glissands and vibrato on wind instruments. The teachers built crystal palaces of art around the students, as free as possible from the influence of "bad" music. Imagine that in Israel in the 60s. the overwhelming majority of the population arriving from Europe had a classical musical education in one size or another, and listened to classical music. Unsurprisingly, when it came to the Beatles' tour of Israel, the government vetoed it. I think all the music teachers in country were happy. Unfamiliar?


Quote
Believe it or not, the 'basic skills of every normal person', is not about moving one's hands, or fingers, on a keyboard. What even is 'normal'?
Invite a student of yours to play the piano for the exact rhythm of the syllables in the sentence "I always play the exact rhythm." Did it go easy?



Quote
Well, anyone can get stuck in a department/academic bubble for a number of years, it's rarely a good thing. I wonder if the department you fronted would have been better served by someone with a true love, passion, understanding, and upbringing of jazz and pop music. As a student I'd find that inspiring.

I'm sure in all those years you may have once stated the idiom: 'self-praise is no praise', to an overzealous student. Regardless of whether you did or not, I offer it now as a humble phrase to keep in mind.
Ask Tamir Hendelman, Itzhak Yadid, Miku Narunsky, Greg Foldvari, Ruslan Sirota, Ofer Portugali, Mordy Ferber, Alona Keren.


Quote
Great CV dire tonic, and I also checked out your YouTube clips earlier today. Very nice playing!

I have noted for a long time that the awful tonic here among us is undoubtedly the most professional pop pianist.

Staying on the subject of pop music, Nahum, I'd like to ask your opinion on some piano tracks I made and uploaded to this site a couple of months ago. I was asking about tips to work out a good pop piano accompaniment. You very kindly offered some advice early in the discussion, but I was surprised you offered no opinion on how you'd improve the tracks.

The thread is here:

http://forum.pianoworld.com/ubbthre...omp-with-pop-rock-songs.html#Post3122911

If you have a chance, please do have a listen and let me know what you'd do to improve the rhythmic groove between my hands, and what you'd do differently to embody the spirit of the song.

.[/quote]Ok, give me some time.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Never met; maybe a demonstration of the internal screws of a mechanism?

Ha, not quite. It's maybe a bit of a British phrase. It basically means no frills, does what it says on the tin, stripped to to the basic cores of functionality. Although, I sense maybe I saw your sense of humor here.


Originally Posted by Nahum



Based on exercise on p.5 , tempo - 92- 280 bpm.
It's about music ,not poking a drum,

I take it you've uploaded this to your own YouTube channel? What you present here is not in the book, in fact the typeset is quite different and it looks like it's been transcribed on Sib or Finale.

Here is a link to the original book I was referring to (no tempo indications):

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wbfiv2x4pdeh4m1/Modern-Reading-Text-in-4x4-Louis-Bellson.pdf?dl=0


Originally Posted by Nahum
On the title page is written FOR ALL INSTRUMENTS . There are specific tutorials for drummers, for example by Ted Reed.

Louis Bellson, the author, was a renowned jazz drummer. Of course rhythm is an issue that spans all instruments, and so can be applied to pretty much anyone wishing to improve that aspect of their understanding. As we know, there are countless method books for all instruments - no definitive method, right?


Originally Posted by Nahum
Attack The initiation of a sound. In terms of the four stages of a sound (Attack, Decay, Sustain and Release, or ADSR), a sound’s attack is the point where the sound begins and increases in volume to its peak. Hitting the table, clapping with two hands (Bellson's exercises are based on this) and snare , sound the beat, but not the duration of the note , as well as the duration of the pauses - this is what I see as a disadvantage of these exercises.

That's the nuts and bolts! Yes, musicality is taken out of the equation, I agree. It's a bit like drill exercises (Hanon springs to mind), where you can be drilling patterns for the sake of function and you forget to make it musical. The purpose of Bellson's book is similar in that regard, but it doesn't mean that one can't be creative and add musicality to it.


Originally Posted by Nahum
This is a superficial view. You, apparently, are unfamiliar with the terror of many teachers of classical music against "Yazz muzik" or against playing with glissands and vibrato on wind instruments. The teachers built crystal palaces of art around the students, as free as possible from the influence of "bad" music. Imagine that in Israel in the 60s. the overwhelming majority of the population arriving from Europe had a classical musical education in one size or another, and listened to classical music. Unsurprisingly, when it came to the Beatles' tour of Israel, the government vetoed it. I think all the music teachers in country were happy. Unfamiliar?

Very unfamiliar to me, yes. My whole upbringing was on rock, blues and jazz music (with a touch of classical here and there). Also, my training happened in the 90s, where I suspect many attitudes were shifting. The point I was making was that there were many piano influences prior to MTV and Billie Jean, which you cited. I know many excellent pianists who were influenced by players like Rick Wakeman, Billy Joel etc.

Originally Posted by Nahum
Invite a student of yours to play the piano for the exact rhythm of the syllables in the sentence "I always play the exact rhythm." Did it go easy?

Sorry, I don't understand your point. Can expand on this?



Originally Posted by Nahum
Ask Tamir Hendelman, Itzhak Yadid, Miku Narunsky, Greg Foldvari, Ruslan Sirota, Ofer Portugali, Mordy Ferber, Alona Keren.


I'm assuming these are some of your successes? My point was about staying humble and grateful. For every success there are many who are unsuccessful, right?


Originally Posted by Nahum
Ok, give me some time.

I'd be grateful for that, thank you.

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I'm gathering that several of you are debating pedagogical methods for gaining proficiency in rhythm ? Unless I'm missing something.

I'm studied and schooled, but not as extensively as some of you. But some of my best "aha moments" were things I discovered from trial and error. And also listening to and internalizing music I came to love. A a child I discovered some swing and blues (circa 1940's) from my father's records (used and very scratchy - purchased at the time after being in juke boxes). Then later I discovered Rhythm&Blues circa 1965 - by listening to WLAC AM radio from Nashville (I was in Central Florida) - late at night when the transmission travels. And then later I purchased and listened to Beatles and other rhythmic based musics. Etc etc.

So fast forward - anyone today with access to YouTube and decent speakers can dial up virtually ANY music - from 1950's tribal African musics - to Patti Page - to deep details in Duke Ellington or Louis Armstrong (circa 1930's). To Arnold Schoenberg to Jacob Collier to the Haden Triplets

(plug for the Haden Triplets - Petra has done some recording with Bill Frisell BTW)


There's no excuse today to be trained exclusively in Western European music to the exclusion of other stuff. And I say.......the best way to learn the other stuff - is to listen , repeatedly, and with intentional focus.

I invented a religion - called Beatlianism. My religion is the ONE and only true way. My religion is sonically based. To practice it, one simply listens to Beatles recordings. But focusing on details. Paul's bass line (usually brilliantly inventive) , vocal harmonies, George's counter-melody over certain songs, sound effects (especially on records like Revolver). And so on and so on. Praise Beatles.

My point to the pedagogues is don't forget to listen. And listen. And listen.

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Originally Posted by indigo_dave
.
My point to the pedagogues is don't forget to listen. And listen. And listen.
You meant, of course, the students.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
.
My point to the pedagogues is don't forget to listen. And listen. And listen.
You meant, of course, the students.

You are correct sir. And I might add - if listening to rhythmic music, dance. Even just in your living room. Feel those rhythms with your body.

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Originally Posted by indigo_dave
Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by indigo_dave
.
My point to the pedagogues is don't forget to listen. And listen. And listen.
You meant, of course, the students.

You are correct sir. And I might add - if listening to rhythmic music, dance. Even just in your living room. Feel those rhythms with your body.
You don't know how many adult students are embarrassed to do this even in front of themselves!

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Originally Posted by indigo_dave
My point to the pedagogues is don't forget to listen. And listen. And listen

Surely, both teacher and student have cause to keep listening - to music and each other.

Originally Posted by indigo_dave
You are correct sir. And I might add - if listening to rhythmic music, dance. Even just in your living room. Feel those rhythms with your body.

I find this is also the case with singing.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Invite a student of yours to play the piano for the exact rhythm of the syllables in the sentence "I always play the exact rhythm." Did it go easy?

Originally Posted by fatar760
Sorry, I don't understand your point. Can expand on this?
.
I practice this with students a lot - in order to transfer the rhythm of the invented sentence into the melodic line, in order to develop improvisation skills. The easiest way.
In this case, this patent proves once again that rhythmic figures are born in the brain in the form of a conscious or unconscious prosody that sends orders to the hand and fingers. If we hear a rhythmic error in performance on an instrument, then one of two things: either the internal prosody is erroneous, or there is no strict coordination between the correct internal rhythmic prosody and the movements of the fingers.
The Russian piano school has also long practiced the use of invented texts (subtext) together with playing in order to enhance the musicality of the phrasing.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Ask Tamir Hendelman, Itzhak Yadid, Miku Narunsky, Greg Foldvari, Ruslan Sirota, Ofer Portugali, Mordy Ferber, Alona Keren.


Originally Posted by fatar760
I'm assuming these are some of your successes?
Also theirs: Tamir Hendelman was the jazz pianist of the month in the States; Ruslan Sirota - twice Jazz Grammy laureate; Alona Keren was the first in Israel to do doctorate on Coltrane music, using material she studied from me.

Quote
My point was about staying humble and grateful
.OK, I humbly and gratefully expect you to find some of them and ask for their opinion of me as a teacher. I do not have a book where such reviews are written on the back cover ...

Quote
For every success there are many who are unsuccessful, right?
Of course, but there is not a single one, not even the weakest, that has not progressed - the most important thing!

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by Nahum
Ask Tamir Hendelman, Itzhak Yadid, Miku Narunsky, Greg Foldvari, Ruslan Sirota, Ofer Portugali, Mordy Ferber, Alona Keren.


Originally Posted by fatar760
I'm assuming these are some of your successes?
Also theirs: Tamir Hendelman was the jazz pianist of the month in the States; Ruslan Sirota - twice Jazz Grammy laureate; Alona Keren was the first in Israel to do doctorate on Coltrane music, using material she studied from me.

Quote
My point was about staying humble and grateful
.OK, I humbly and gratefully expect you to find some of them and ask for their opinion of me as a teacher. I do not have a book where such reviews are written on the back cover ...

Quote
For every success there are many who are unsuccessful, right?
Of course, but there is not a single one, not even the weakest, that has not progressed - the most important thing!

Nahum, I don't think asking a fellow forum user to seek out your former students in order to heap praise back at you is quite displaying the humility I suggested in my previous post. In actual fact it's quite the opposite, and would no doubt be a little perturbing for them if carried out.

I truly hope you feel grateful to have worked with students who have had success, whereby you can also revel in their celebration. There's nothing more rewarding them being a small cog in someone's success.

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Originally Posted by fatar760
I truly hope you feel grateful to have worked with students who have had success, whereby you can also revel in their celebration. There's nothing more rewarding them being a small cog in someone's success.
Didn't like your efforts to reduce the size of your opponent -the truth doesn't interest you.

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Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by fatar760
I truly hope you feel grateful to have worked with students who have had success, whereby you can also revel in their celebration. There's nothing more rewarding them being a small cog in someone's success.
Didn't like your efforts to reduce the size of your opponent -the truth doesn't interest you.

Nahum, I'd respectfully suggest that you refrain from casting aspersions on any user's integrity and avoid using inflammatory language. For clarification, I do not view you as an opponent, and hope that is reciprocated. We're all equals here, on our independent journeys, and should conduct ourselves in a humble and supportive manner.

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Originally Posted by fatar760
Staying on the subject of pop music, Nahum, I'd like to ask your opinion on some piano tracks I made and uploaded to this site a couple of months ago. I was asking about tips to work out a good pop piano accompaniment. You very kindly offered some advice early in the discussion, but I was surprised you offered no opinion on how you'd improve the tracks.

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If I promised, then I keep my word.


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Originally Posted by Nahum
Originally Posted by fatar760
Staying on the subject of pop music, Nahum, I'd like to ask your opinion on some piano tracks I made and uploaded to this site a couple of months ago. I was asking about tips to work out a good pop piano accompaniment. You very kindly offered some advice early in the discussion, but I was surprised you offered no opinion on how you'd improve the tracks.

.
If I promised, then I keep my word.


[Linked Image]

https://soundcloud.com/jazzman1945/like-a-prayer

Thank you for taking the time to transcribe that, it's good to hear an alternative.

What did you look to change from my version, and in what way do you feel it compliments the groove of the original? Is there a live version of you playing it where I can hear some of the non-quantized musical nuances? More importantly, what did you think of the tracks I made?

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