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Joined: May 2019
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dpcjazz and xxoxferretxox--to be completely clear--people with mental/emotional problems, may seek out the arts as a "profession", but that does not mean that they have any ability, not does it mean that they get any positive effects from being in that field.

It may be that they find a certain level of acceptance, or a milieu that feels better than another field. After all, art may be whatever a person says it is. Accounting, not so much.

And again, and I can't stress this enough, there are plenty of people who do not have any mental illness who, for whatever reason (pure cussedness), will not accept anyone else's advice or opinions, and so drift into a field where "individuality" counts more than in, say, banking. Again, this does not mean that they actually have any talent.

hmm--am I describing myself???---nah.

all this talk is circling around the "conceptual" and "performance" artists.

and btw--does xoxferretxox have ferrets? does dogperson have dogs? both so cool.

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Dogperson had a long-lived dog that died two weeks ago. Now, I just have a spoiled young cat. I promise myself that I will not get another dog but I doubt if I will end up keeping that promise Since I’ve always had at least one.. ... a young one just takes a ton of work but I’m sure a needy rescue will show up 🐶


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

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dogperson, my condolences. I've had 3 beloved dogs die, and they were traumatic events. I doubt that I will get another at my age.

2 of mine were adopted at ages past puppyhood. Older dogs need homes too.

all 3 were too small to reach the keyboard.

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I am certain that the madness of my music keeps me sane in life. Mapping the landscape of my lifelong psyche, in all its beauty and horror, onto abstract sound in acts of spontaneous creation transcends any other experience I know. The correlation between artistic creation and mental illness therefore saddens and puzzles me. The evidence cannot be disputed but I wish it were not so and I am very grateful that having the right family and teachers, being good enough at something else for a living, and perhaps a certain perversity of artistic taste, have so far spared me these consequences.


"We shall always love the music of the masters, but they are all dead and now it's our turn." - Llewelyn Jones, my piano teacher
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Ted[I am very grateful that having the right family and teachers, being good enough at something else for a living, and perhaps a certain perversity of artistic taste, have so far spared me these consequences.]
So true Ted the right family and teachers and being good enough at something else for a living. I have all of those and of course a certain perversity of artistic taste. I remember the time at my restaurant Bobby Shew the great trumpet player was sitting at table ten enjoying the music and me being the owner went up to him and ask if he was enjoying himself. He said I know who you are David and I really like your tamales well it wasn't the musical compliment I was looking for but hey with the food,the restaurant, the family it was the best compliment I could of gotten. I remember when Lucas Pino the sax player was at the restaurant playing a gig before he left, I ask him why do you come here to play with us and he said [ man you let me eat a steak for my meal] so there again not the musical compliment I was looking for but still quite rewarding. I use to bribe certain musicians with a doz red tamales on top of their pay they never said no to my call.
Ted if I remember you mostly improvise your music how is it going?

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Originally Posted by dpvjazz
Ted if I remember you mostly improvise your music how is it going?

Thank you for asking, it is going very well. The decision, fifteen years ago, to embrace recorded, free improvisation as my principal creative medium has proved exactly the right choice for me. It was precipitated by many things: my retirement, the availability of relatively cheap, high quality recording devices, hearing the solo concerts of Jarrett, realising that my large heap of compositions, although not bad were essentially derivative, rhythmically hidebound by notation and music of the past. There is nothing iconoclastic about me, I play and listen to classical most days, and my infatuation with ragtime appears indestructible, but a truly creative temperament must pursue his own dream, not the dreams of others or what other people say he ought to be doing.

I doubt I would be playing at all at seventy-three without my Virgil Practice Clavier, a truly marvellous device, which I hope will preserve my technique for many years yet. My recordings, at the last count, comprise around six hundred hours and I try to make at least two or three a week. I couldn’t bear standing musically still, and unless each session reaches out in some way I feel it to be a partial failure.


"We shall always love the music of the masters, but they are all dead and now it's our turn." - Llewelyn Jones, my piano teacher
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I have to say that my immersion in music is such a positive thing on my life. I would be lost without it. Becoming a jazz musician is the structure of my life. I play piano and bass. Right now I have an excellent private teacher. I look at other people who are about to retire, and they seem lost as to how they are going to spend their time.

Music is what I am going to be doing more of once I finally "retire" from my day job in less than a year, which actually is in the field of clinician for mental health. My day job as a health care worker causes more stress and anxiety than anything that has ever happened to me in the music world, whether during the process of getting a music degree , playing out, and learning from teachers. My job is very social and involves close interaction with others, so practicing is a great balance to that. No, not bipolar and not depressed. Actually, lock downs, etc. were easy to deal with because it allowed for more time in the practice room. As I have gotten older, I like having time to myself to practice and listen, and but I also immensely enjoy playing out, having gigs. One of the biggest joys of life.

I have spent a lot of time at another music site and it just seems that the happiest musical people are those who have a day job, and hopefully a day job they like, and are weekend warriors, when gigs are possible, taking the pandemic into account and reduced gigs. Sometimes a former full time musician will say that have had enough and choose the relative monetary security of a day job. Or have a lucrative part-time job that makes involvement in music possible.

I agree, it is really tough to be a full time musician in any genre. And especially tough in the past year or so.

Last edited by gracegren; 06/05/21 10:32 PM.

Kawaii ES-110; Casio Privia PX-S-1000
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Getting heavy man.

I think that anything you do for a living is stressful, because you can't afford not to--that's stress right there. And the more and heavier the responsibility, the more stress. And if you want to keep your job, you've got to perform to at least the minimum requirements. If you want to rise higher, you work harder and network, schmooze, and apply grease. Ugh. And all the time the level of risk rises.

I'm retired, 30 years at a low-level data pushing job. Answered to one person at a time, never had to face the public, except in a previous life as pro musician. I've never felt better, nor played better.

Having played every day for 65 years (except for about 5 years in late teens/early 20s), I would go nuts without playing. So I play, ANYTIME I WANT. My house is about 100 feet away from my nearest neighbor, I could play at 3 am if I were awake then.

For those of you who are about to retire, this could be your most productive and satisfying time of your life. Or not, if you liked other things better--like working lol.

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