2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad) Piano Sight Reading
train piano sight reading with your iPhone or iPad
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
56 members (CodySean, brdwyguy, accordeur, CaseyVancouver, Beansparrow, BlakeOR, 10 invisible), 458 guests, and 429 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,759
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,759
Originally Posted by Wehhua
Many replies overnight, none of which mentioned I should quit. ThankI actually don't know my current level, my teacher gave me homework, see below: http://www.qupu123.com/qiyue/gangqin/p190747.html, I have been working on this piece 2 weeks now(about 1 hour a day), and still making mistakes when playing, the speed of course is slower than what is requested on the book. My teacher admit that Bach is harder than most other categories because it involves a lot of coordination between hands.

That piece is way too difficult and too long for someone who has only 2 years of piano. So if you like it why not, but then you have to expect it will take you monthes to get to a somehow decent state. Just to be able to play the trill correctly could take several weeks of work. You should definitely put that on a backburner and work out pieces at your current level. In general, Bach works, except a handful of easy pieces, like easy minuets (some not even composed by him) is not a good candidate for beginners. You need to develop your hand coordination before that. But you can certainly extract short passages and use them as exercices.

I agree with others, you need to play pieces at your level and get used to polish some of them (does not have to be all) at best you can. You need to get used to play a piece end to end and manage small mistakes. At the beginning it is difficult, but with practice it gets easier. If you only play pieces too difficult, you will never develop the playing ability.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 873
P
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 873
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by petebfrance
That piece, in my vernacular, is a 'pig' to play.
I like idioms. What does it mean?
To quote the free dictionary - a pig of... "a pig of a (something) slang A particularly difficult, unpleasant, or undesirable task or thing. I thought I'd be done hours ago, but I've had a pig of a time getting this car up and running again. It was a pig of a game, with both teams clawing and fighting for each goal."
That's a bit of an overstatement, but the meaning is pretty clear.
In my case I do occasionally play that piece, but it is something that I found I needed to be careful with because otherwise I ran out of fingers in the left hand because it does not fit my usual fingering pattern - it needs more attention than I'm willing to give it.

Last edited by petebfrance; 04/07/21 06:02 AM.

regards
Pete
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,050
I
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,050
Originally Posted by petebfrance
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by petebfrance
That piece, in my vernacular, is a 'pig' to play.
I like idioms. What does it mean?
To quote the free dictionary - a pig of... "a pig of a (something) slang A particularly difficult, unpleasant, or undesirable task or thing. I thought I'd be done hours ago, but I've had a pig of a time getting this car up and running again. It was a pig of a game, with both teams clawing and fighting for each goal."
That's a bit of an overstatement, but the meaning is pretty clear.
In my case I do occasionally play that piece, but it is something that I found I needed to be careful with because otherwise I ran out of fingers in the left hand because it does not fit my usual fingering pattern - it needs more attention than I'm willing to give it.
I see. Thank you.

Joined: Feb 2021
Posts: 48
P
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Feb 2021
Posts: 48
Originally Posted by Wehhua
I have been learning piano for nearly two years now and several times feeling like to give up.
As a adult leaner, I think I have spent above-average time on practice every day because if I don’t do so, I won’t be able to finish homework assigned by my piano teacher properly , the homework usually consists of one piece Czerny 599 and a small part of Bach(primary level) or other music. I practice 2-2.5 hours per day including 15-20 mins on basic skills like scales, arpeggio and IV chord.

I don’t know for others but I know after nearly 2 years, I still not be able to play a whole song fluently without mistakes or pause, this is really frustrating. In addition to that, my hand is too small to even reach octave.

Sometimes, I was wondering if it’s still worth keeping going on

Perhaps reducing the amount of time on the piano. You can change your own expectations and your teacher will match. You are driving this after all.

A few weeks ago, I promised myself to practice for 30 minutes each day on the piano; but that only lasted a week. One good thing about being old is that I can quickly realize my limits; and 30 minutes per day is way too much time on the piano for me. So, I removed that promise; and instantly, I feel liberated. I've gone back to practicing 0-10 minutes per day like I've been doing for the last 4 months; and piano is more fun this way.

Sometimes, I'm amazed at the amount of hours people on this forum put into piano practice, and that's a bit contagious (i.e. caused me to try to do 30 minutes per day). However, I guess piano just doesn't hold such importance to me for 30 min daily. So, once I set a more realistic goal, things work out much better. For me, that turns out to be about 1 hr per week ATM.

So, try maybe reducing your practice time to 30 mins per day. A drastic reduction; you may not even know what to do with all that extra time smile

Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
E
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
Also, Hailun makes a 7/8th upright piano, same piano narrower keys. You should be able to reach a octave easy, and a 9th.

I can reach a 9th but not 10th, and I've considered getting this piano for myself. It's just more comfortable to play regardless of repertoire, because your wrists don't need to turn nearly as much.

I believe there are retrofits actions available for Grand pianos as well also by hailun.

https://thepianoplace.com/pages/smaller-sized-keys

Last edited by EinLudov; 04/07/21 09:12 AM.
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,050
I
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 2,050
Originally Posted by EinLudov
Also, Hailun makes a 7/8th upright piano, same piano narrower keys. You should be able to reach a octave easy, and a 9th.

I can reach a 9th but not 10th, and I've considered getting this piano for myself. It's just more comfortable to play regardless of repertoire, because your wrists don't need to turn nearly as much.

I believe there are retrofits actions available for Grand pianos as well also by hailun.

https://thepianoplace.com/pages/smaller-sized-keys
I wonder what amount of re-learning will be necessary to get used to narrower keys?

Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
E
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
I wonder what amount of re-learning will be necessary to get used to narrower keys?

15 minutes adjustment period. grin

Last edited by EinLudov; 04/07/21 09:24 AM.
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
S
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
Definitely don't give up, you are very dedicated and you never said you don't like playing. I too am a beginner and it took me a couple years to realize most things take longer than expected to learn on piano. For me my biggest weaknesses were selecting pieces too hard and no clear practice plan/strategy. I'm not sayin these are your weaknesses, my point is each time you find these things and correct them playing becomes more fun and then you progress even more.

Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,320
G
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,320
What I have found helps is to spend the majority of my time playing music I like rather than set pieces from my piano teacher (athough these are to some extent chosen together). After all I am only playing piano for my own enjoyment and satisfaction, and if I'm enjoying myself the time flies and I spend longer at the piano and in the end learn more. Maybe I'm not a good pupil - but I'm not a kid at school either.

I do find that if pieces increase in difficulty too fast it really helps to just drop back and play something new at my sight reading level so that I can relax and just enjoy playing. A big book of graded music such as Jennifer Linn's "Journey through the classics" is really useful for this as you can just dip in and out of the book as required.

Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
S
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
Originally Posted by gwing
What I have found helps is to spend the majority of my time playing music I like rather than set pieces from my piano teacher (athough these are to some extent chosen together). After all I am only playing piano for my own enjoyment and satisfaction, and if I'm enjoying myself the time flies and I spend longer at the piano and in the end learn more. Maybe I'm not a good pupil - but I'm not a kid at school either.

I do find that if pieces increase in difficulty too fast it really helps to just drop back and play something new at my sight reading level so that I can relax and just enjoy playing. A big book of graded music such as Jennifer Linn's "Journey through the classics" is really useful for this as you can just dip in and out of the book as required.

Just curious do the songs in that book gradually increase in difficulty? Or is Book 1 all about the same level of difficulty then Book 2 is all nearly same level of difficulty? Or is the first arrangements in Book 1 easier than the last arrangement in book 1?

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,107
2000 Post Club Member
Online Content
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,107
Originally Posted by Sidokar
You need to get used to play a piece end to end and manage small mistakes. At the beginning it is difficult, but with practice it gets easier. If you only play pieces too difficult, you will never develop the playing ability.
Professor John Mortensen talks about this, I can’t remember the precise term, he called it something like “closing the circle”: working through a piece all the way to polishing and performance. He said that going through the entire cycle is very important. In the university setting, he said that many students have only had experience with closing the circle a handful of times per year, especially if they worked with long or difficult pieces; some would only have 3-4 pieces per year that went through that whole cycle. The more we go all the way with a piece, the better we become at the process, and our playing improves exponentially. It’s very, very important.


Lisa

Playing RCM 7-8 repertoire
Cunningham Studio Grand & Yamaha CLP645

"I tell my piano the things I used to tell you." - Frederic Chopin
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 35
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 35
I've been playing for about 2 1/2 years as well. I don't have a teacher anymore because of the pandemic, but I did up until last March. We worked in method books and on whatever pieces I wanted to work on that were appropriate for my level. At the beginning I struggled with working with a metronome, so we focused on that with very basic pieces for a lot of the time I was in the class with her, so she could give me suggestions to improve. She expected me to make progress and show improvement but I wasn't given specific homework that I had to work on for hours a day. I think that alone would completely stress me out. She would recommend that I work on scales, chords, etc, because it would help me in the future and there were some pieces that she wanted me to make part of my repertoire because they were pieces that I particularly liked and played well, so she suggested I commit those to memory. But I don't think I ever felt the pressure that comes through in your post. Perhaps your teacher isn't a good fit for you? You say in your post that you picked Bach because it would help you play popular songs in the future, why aren't you just playing popular songs now? If that's what you prefer? Seems odd to learn classical music in order to play popular music when you could just play the music that you like and perhaps enjoy the journey a lot more. My teacher was a coach to help me reach my own goals, it sounds like your teacher wants you to reach their goals that may not match your own?


Amy
Early Beginner
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
S
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
Originally Posted by Amykpiano
You say in your post that you picked Bach because it would help you play popular songs in the future, why aren't you just playing popular songs now? If that's what you prefer? Seems odd to learn classical music in order to play popular music when you could just play the music that you like and perhaps enjoy the journey a lot more. My teacher was a coach to help me reach my own goals, it sounds like your teacher wants you to reach their goals that may not match your own?

I second this and I can relate. I was taking lessons with a classical teacher as I thought that’s the route all pianist did even ones that want to play pop. I did not enjoy my lessons, assignments, or homework that much. While I learned a lot from the teacher I was so happy I changed to pop teacher as it’s way different and it’s what I want to learn so it’s so much more fun for me. I’m not slamming classical but it simply was not enjoyable for me. Therefore if the OP does want to learn pop I would also suggest looking into a new teacher or letting the current teacher know you want to study pop but from what I understand a classical teacher doesn’t teach pop and vice versa.

Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
E
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
For a beginner, I don't think playing pop vs classical makes a difference. There's no real advanced pop. An arrangement might have more notes or variations, but pop music is basically canon d on rerun for the entire song. You get sick of it in a few days. If I have to listen to one more person play amelie I'll kill myself. grin

Last edited by EinLudov; 04/07/21 11:19 PM.
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
S
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 645
Originally Posted by EinLudov
For a beginner, I don't think playing pop vs classical makes a difference. There's no real advanced pop. An arrangement might have more notes or variations, but pop music is basically canon d on rerun for the entire song. You get sick of it in a few days. If I have to listen to one more person play amelie I'll kill myself. grin

I think it does matter, while there are some basics everyone will learn why spend time studying pieces or area you don’t enjoy? What does it matter if there is advanced pop or not? And there is plenty of advanced pop, improvising and playing by ear is not easy. Music is all about what people prefer and some of us enjoy pop more. There’s no standard for piano.

Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,001
E
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,001
Originally Posted by EinLudov
For a beginner, I don't think playing pop vs classical makes a difference. There's no real advanced pop. An arrangement might have more notes or variations, but pop music is basically canon d on rerun for the entire song. You get sick of it in a few days. If I have to listen to one more person play amelie I'll kill myself. grin


👌🤣🤣


Surprisingly easy, barely an inconvenience.

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 186
R
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
R
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 186
There are many ridiculously difficult pop arrangements.







Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,005
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,005
Originally Posted by ranjit
There are many ridiculously difficult pop arrangements.
Yes, and all of these pianists have obviously been classically trained for many years. You don't get that good by playing only pop.

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,005
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,005
Originally Posted by Sebs
I think it does matter, while there are some basics everyone will learn why spend time studying pieces or area you don’t enjoy? What does it matter if there is advanced pop or not? And there is plenty of advanced pop, improvising and playing by ear is not easy. Music is all about what people prefer and some of us enjoy pop more. There’s no standard for piano.
If you enjoy it than that's fine. Theoretically, you could learn proper piano technique from gradually more difficult arrangements of pop songs but that requires your teacher to be extremely aware of all the technical/musical elements and find or arrange pieces for your specific level. Most pop teachers focus more on improvisation than expression or technique. There is also a different style of approaching pieces. With classical pieces when something is really hard you tend to work your ass off to master the technical challenges. With pop you can always fake it or make it easier so there isn't as much pressure to push yourself.

But again, not everyone wants to be a virtuoso and if you enjoy it then good for you.

Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
E
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
E
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 314
Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
Originally Posted by ranjit
There are many ridiculously difficult pop arrangements.
Yes, and all of these pianists have obviously been classically trained for many years. You don't get that good by playing only pop.

@ ranjit, we're not saying pop music can't have difficult technical elements, but if you listen to the progression, it's quite hollow. We're not saying it's bad, but it is musically very basic.

And from the beginning, No one aught to be against anyone learning the mechanical playing craft from pop music. The goal however, at some point it will click for every pianist, you get that feeling, when canon in d comes on the radio, you want to find the nearest shovel and smash the radio. At this point, You've graduated, welcome to advanced music, here's your complementary flash drive of pirated classical sheetmusic.

Last edited by EinLudov; 04/08/21 09:40 AM.
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Couch to Concert Hall
Couch to Concert Hall
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Recommend me a trouble-free Garritan CFX computer!
by Gombessa - 04/21/21 08:12 PM
Which one do you like - ABRSM vs RCM??
by Pikka - 04/21/21 06:35 PM
Sauter o Bechstein
by Luis Miguel - 04/21/21 05:57 PM
Pricing information for new Steinway/Yamaha?
by lct14558 - 04/21/21 04:10 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics206,455
Posts3,085,112
Members101,266
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5