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I would place so that the open lid would project to the longer depth of the room.

As of your current placement the sound will be reflected back from the very close nearby wall. That is not good.

Last edited by Hakki; 02/25/21 03:03 PM.
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Originally Posted by Hakki
I would place so that the open lid would project to the longer depth of the room.

As of your current placement the sound will be reflected back from the very close nearby wall. That is not good.
This is relevant if the OP intends to play with the lid up.

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Originally Posted by Guido, Roma - Italy
Hi everybody,

I did try to figure out how a baby grand (likely a Kawai GL-30) could fit in my room:

http://forum.pianoworld.com//ubbthreads.php/galleries/3086663.html#Post3086663
Do you have a shade for the window and balcony door?

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It was easy for me to push my piano around on its casters, over the Pergo floor. It gave me a chance to find the place where it really sounded best, and felt right. (I have to add, take this suggestion with caution; a lot depends on the sturdiness of the piano and the surface of the flooring. It's not impossible to break a leg off on a very rough or uneven surface, or break a porcelain tile floor.) But, rather than reinvent the wheel, I started with the advice that the piano might work best placed at about 45 degrees against the longest wall, with the tail about one-third of the way down. Although I didn't get to the right spot solely by following a formula, I got pretty close.

It's ok for the piano to dominate the room--- that is what rooms are for, and this one will become, almost instantly, your music room. A piano that doesn't dominate the room is not much of a piano. It will dominate you, too, until you get to the point that you are its master. And even then, at times, one could wonder. It's not the piano: it is, that we come into touch with the great masters and their masterworks. Some humility is quite appropriate. When you get to the point that you couldn't imagine your room any other way, and love it completely, it will pump life into this room the way your heart pumps vitalizing blood into the tissues of your body.

As for the furnishings, nothing could be in better taste or practical use in a music room, than bookshelves stuffed with scores and musicians' biographies, recordings; soon it will be time for more shelves. Luckily, they do great things for the room acoustic. Hard, reflective surfaces, not so much. Carpets, shutters or curtains, doors or windows that can let some of the sound energy out. I have room for a short, but very handsome and comfortable, couch, which breaks up standing waves and has lighting which is excellent both for reading, and which gives a nice backlight to the piano. That helps prevent eyestrain, and makes it feel warmer in the winter.

You may hit it right, first time out, but for me it has been a process: lots of trial and error., or growth and a new adjustment. Maybe that doesn't sound quite as bad. And BTW, I have a small table on wheels next to the piano.. There are lots of things that never go on the piano. Pencils. Beverages. Paper clips. Note paper, scored manuscript paper, pencil sharpener.


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Guido
So you have decided on the GL10 rather than the GL30 ?
If this is the case it should be fine .The GL10.has a much softer sound than the GL30 and it has a mellow sound rather than a brighter sound of the bigger size Kawai.
Since you have your library in that room do not add too many other things .Perhaps only a small carpet. You do not want to soak up all the sound .
A template ( cut out of the shape and size of the piano) is a good idea.

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Dear Lady Bird,

I did not opt for the GL-10, I am still reasoning keeping the GL-30 as my first reference. The alternative to the GL-30 would be the Yamaha GC2. I do like the sound of the bass of the GL-30 compared to the GL-10, I even hope in my fantasy to become good at using the walking bass ... this is the main reason I went for the GL-30 ...

I tried several placement of the piano on paper just not to make blind attempts when the movers will bring in the piano. The image that I posted in the gallery is at the moment my favorite.

My wife prefers to have the window in the back and placing the piano with the long wall in the back it seems difficult with a piano 166 cm long (80 cm for the bench + 166 cm = 246 cm ... my room is only 295 cm large).

I think that it is true that in the placement I have chosen the lid will reflect the sound against the closer wall (the short side of my room).
However, which better alternative I have given the size of the room?

I also have another question though: will I be able to move the piano in the room by myself (with the help of a friend)?

Thank you to all of you for the mindful suggestions you are giving me. And yes I will perhaps buy curtains and a rug to improve the acoustic of the room.

http://forum.pianoworld.com//ubbthreads.php/galleries/3086663.html#Post3086663

Last edited by Guido, Roma - Italy; 02/26/21 12:12 PM.
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Originally Posted by Guido, Roma - Italy
I also have another question though: will I be able to move the piano in the room by myself (with the help of a friend)?
Do you have a tile floor? Is it completely smooth? The more people helping you move a piano the less chance of an accident. I think ideally three people, one at each leg, is by far the best. The idea is to lift up slightly as you are moving the piano to take the stress off the leg. If your floor is completely smooth and there is no rug, then for a relatively small piano, one experienced person can probably move it but one inexperienced person might be taking a big chance. The size and quality of the caster also probably is a factor.

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Originally Posted by David-G
Also, if you paint the room first, you will not get any paint spots on the piano!

There's an episode on Cheers in which Norm paints Frasier and Lilith's apartment, and he actually stages his paint cans on the piano! Sacrilege...


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Originally Posted by Ken Iisaka
If the piano fits in the room, it fits in the room.


I tend to agree with this.

There's a lot of good info in that linked article. I just had another look at it, though, and chuckled again when I got to the super easy peasy multiple of 10 for the minimum perimeter dimensions! What's the likelihood of that actually being the empirically deduced measure? Not 9, or 11, let alone 8.75345 or 11.2343? And to the extent it's been adjusted or "rounded" for simplicity, well, that would just be indicative of how loosey goosey a figure it actually is.

And at a ceiling height of 8 feet! What if you have 9 foot ceilings? Can you subtract 1 from the other dimensions? One dimension? Both? Or do you add, to keep the "shape" of the space similar? Perhaps you just increase (or decrease?) the multiple itself. ??? Is it linear? Hmmm....


My understanding is that, unless you're talking about a piano designed for volume projection, increased length impacts tone much more than volume. If it's too "big" for the space sonically, then you voice the piano and/or treat the space as necessary.

The big questions are: Can movers get it in? Can a tech work around it? Can you live with it?


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If you decide to move it, consider pulling from the tail end, rather than pushing from the keyboard end. It’s safer, as it’s less stress on the back leg.

Also, when you lay the fly lid back and raise the lid, where in space will that pointy part be? Mine’s a hazard when getting to a cabinet next to the piano. I’m the only one who opens the cabinet, so it’s not a big deal, but it’s just about eye level and If there was a lot of traffic there, I would move the cabinet.


Enjoy your new piano!


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Originally Posted by Guido, Roma - Italy
My wife prefers to have the window in the back and placing the piano with the long wall in the back it seems difficult with a piano 166 cm long (80 cm for the bench + 166 cm = 246 cm ... my room is only 295 cm large).

I think that it is true that in the placement I have chosen the lid will reflect the sound against the closer wall (the short side of my room).
However, which better alternative I have given the size of the room?

http://forum.pianoworld.com//ubbthreads.php/galleries/3086663.html#Post3086663
Quite honestly, given the size and configuration of the room, perhaps another viable alternative might be to flip the piano around 180 degrees so that the hinged side of the lid is flush against the wall and the piano's tail is in the upper corner of the room. This will solve the reflecting sound problem when the lid is raised, and also provide more useable, open space in the room itself. It would also protect the tail of the piano from being hit or scratched by anyone trying to walk through the room to the balcony door.


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Carey,

If understand your point, do you suggest that the keyboard should be placed so to have the long wall on the back of the pianist?

Last edited by Guido, Roma - Italy; 03/02/21 08:30 AM.
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Originally Posted by Guido, Roma - Italy
Carey,

If understand your point, do you suggest that the keyboard should be placed so to have the long wall on the back of the pianist?
The straight (not curved) side of the piano (where the lid is hinged to the piano) would be next to the long wall. The keyboard would stick out at a right angle from the wall, and when you sit on the bench, your lift arm would be nearest to the long wall and you'd be looking directly at the wall where the balcony is. When you walk into the room from the rest of the apartment, you'd initially see the back of he pianist. Or you can do the same thing, but angle the tail of the piano just a tad toward the balcony door In fact, that might look better. Just a thought.


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I would move the desk south and rotate 90 degrees until it hits the wall with the entrance. Position the piano long side on the West wall.

Share bench with desk and piano.


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