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Well, OK, I agree with the last one, I think I know some posers too. But the rest of the opinions is just too vague and controversial. (I edited my previous post and added something in that regard). But as I said, I agree partially regarding the snobbery of some people. Although I’ve seen more of these in jazz.


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Originally Posted by CyberGene
Well, OK, I agree with the last one, I think I know some posers too. But the rest of the opinions is just too vague and controversial. (I edited my previous post and added something in that regard). But as I said, I agree partially regarding the snobbery of some people. Although I’ve seen more of these in jazz.

I get the feeling that this happens in almost any genre. The snobbery in Hip-Hop for example can be quite intense. People identify strongly with the music they listen to and see any critique on the music as a critique of their personality. Or something like this, but in my experience there is always a group of people that looks down on other genres of music in any genre of music.

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Originally Posted by chopinetto
I think Baroque and Classical era music is inherently less expressive than Romantic music. I'm not saying the earlier styles were not beautiful, or that they could not communicate certain feelings in some way. Obviously they could, but the Romantics did it better. Nothing Bach or Mozart ever did can make me feel, so palpably, the tragedy contained in, say, the doppio movimento in Chopin Op. 48/1 (Rubinstein's being unequaled).

This is your personal view. In my own personal view, I find that baroque and classical music in general speaks to me with more immediacy and depth than does Romantic music. (There are exceptions, of course - in particular, Berlioz.) I find that nowhere in music do I find more tragedy - actually tragedy is the wrong word, let us say that nowhere in music do I find more immense and unconsolable sadness - than in the operas of Mozart and of Handel (and of Berlioz).

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Originally Posted by FloRi89
In this case the only really unpopular opinion would be "I enjoy classical music", because that would put you into a small minority..
I beg to differ (actually, I never beg - I demand).

The only really unpopular opinion would be "I can't stand pop music". I use it to bring an end to 'conversations' where the other person believes that he/she has all the interesting things to say, and keeps interrupting others to tell them of their own experience (whether it's wrestling with pangolins, or eating anacondas' livers with fava beans and a glass of chianti) which is, of course, far more interesting than what the person who actually started the subject has to say, before he/she has even said it.

Here in the UK, politicians already know for several decades that a certain death knell for their political career would be to attend Die Zäuberflote at Glyndebourne (unless they are heavily disguised with a powdered wig and dark Elton sunglasses), whereas by associating themselves with the latest pop "artiste", especially shaking hands with them on TV and professing their dying love for their latest 'song' (which BTW was written by a team of songwriters in Sweden who write songs to order) accompanied by lots of gyrations on the obligatory video, they would instantly be perceived as "electable" because they know what the public wants (which is most definitely not classical music). So, you'd never get a career politician to admit that he actually prefers Mozart to all that current pop and hiphop rubbish. (After he's retired from politics, yes....)

As everyone here knows, I'm the very opposite of an extroverted and garrulous socialite, so I like to disengage myself from boring conversations before they've started by saying that I hate pop music. No need even to profess my dying love for Mozart - people will immediately make their excuses and move away from me swiftly before I can even say "Ebola".......... whistle grin


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Originally Posted by bennevis
Here in the UK, politicians already know for several decades that a certain death knell for their political career would be to attend Die Zäuberflote at Glyndebourne (unless they are heavily disguised with a powdered wig and dark Elton sunglasses)

Wouldn't that make it quite unpopular though?

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Beethoven's late sonatas are the most deepest piano music of all time.

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Originally Posted by 24000rpm
Beethoven's late sonatas are the most deepest piano music of all time.
I think that's a pretty popular opinion!

Or at least one that would be viewed admirably.

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I do not think so. The deepest piano music is at the bottom of my pile of music!


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Originally Posted by BDB
I do not think so. The deepest piano music is at the bottom of my pile of music!

So, that makes it perhaps 'unpopular' music for you to play, but not an unpopular opinion what he said! smile

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Originally Posted by Mark_C
Originally Posted by BDB
I do not think so. The deepest piano music is at the bottom of my pile of music!

So, that makes it perhaps 'unpopular' music for you to play, but not an unpopular opinion what he said! smile
That means I jumped into Beethoven at the deep end, because the first Beethoven sonata I learnt with my teacher was Op.110.

However, I've had swimming lessons as a kid, so I floated to the surface......


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I am ready to anger more folks:

1. Schumann is overrated and I find Mendelssohn's piano repertoire to be much more interesting.
2. Learning "passagework" is better done via Classical era repertoire than dull repetition of technical exercises.
3. One is never "too young" or "not qualified" to learn a piece of music (i.e. late Beethoven) if they love it and are willing to let the piece mature with them.

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The "Schumann is overrated" thing is one of the earliest and longest-running subjects in this thread...I think most have already weighed-in on that one.

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Maybe this is unpopular, but I think thinking that Schumann is overrated is overrated. grin

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Originally Posted by Mark_C
Maybe this is unpopular, but I think thinking that Schumann is overrated is overrated. grin
Thinking thinking Schumman is overrated is overrated is overrated. smile

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Originally Posted by D959
I am ready to anger more folks:

1. Schumann is overrated and I find Mendelssohn's piano repertoire to be much more interesting.
Shucks - you're just saying that because you know the opposite it true.

Quote
2. Learning "passagework" is better done via Classical era repertoire than dull repetition of technical exercises.
Now THAT is true !!!

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3. One is never "too young" or "not qualified" to learn a piece of music (i.e. late Beethoven) if they love it and are willing to let the piece mature with them.
The piece itself is mature. We're the ones who need to grow into it.


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Physical tension can be good.
Physical tension is necessary.
Playing through pain is sometimes the right thing to do.
To play fast, you must play fast.


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Originally Posted by Keith D Kerman
Physical tension can be good.
Physical tension is necessary.
Playing through pain is sometimes the right thing to do.
To play fast, you must play fast.
Wow. Care to explain? The only one I agree with is that to play fast, you must play fast.

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Vaughn Williams is great.

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The two symphonies of William Walton are among the best symphonies ever. Walton is massively underrated.


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well, when I started, pretty much my only goal, or say ,95% of my goal is to play all of bach's keyboard work. I personally think all others piano works are , to quote somebody else so that I don't have to put flame suite on, "trash". Of course, I don't think they are trash, but unmatched to Bach's. talk about relativity.


Originally Posted by Ubu
I don't know if has been proposed. But there's mine: Chopin music is to easy to grasp and is what uneducated people listens when they want to pose as connoisseurs. Music appreciation being in general an acquired taste, Chopin music is the easiest to acquire. Maybe that's the reason why some complete piano beginners have this unique goal of playing certain Chopin piece. You don't see any begginer saying: my only goal about piano is playing Bach's art of fugue or Ravel's valses.

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