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Joined: Jul 2020
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I tried several Yamaha upright pianos of my friends, churches ,which made in 1970~1980.

Eventhough they are not expensive , small, but the tones were so beautiful , long sustain , great controlability and touch was very repsponsive and smooth, tuning pin blocks were very tight as much as brand new ones.

In my personal opinion, their qualities are much better than 1990~2000 or later. Also I found one of my friends piano has no false beat at all. I am sure it has no false beat as I played the piano for several years. I tuned the piano about 7 years ago and the standard pitch is still 440.5 Hz , all notes are almost in same pitch. Unfortunately she cannot play piano and it is abandoned piano and she doesn't want to sell, wants to keep it as home decoration. It has beautiful music tone , mellow and clean tone.

Have you ever tried 1970 ~ 1980 Yamaha? All of them I tried were amazing good pianos.

Last edited by tony3304; 01/24/21 05:43 AM.
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Hi Tony,

These pianos can be incredibly beautiful, and I do find that somewhat strange since they were mid-range pianos. They were built to a price point, and they had an expected lifespan of something like 25 years, maybe 30, and yet here some of them are 50, 60 years later still sounding good.

The problem with this though is that these pianos are now all very old. I don't know if in the early days Yamaha used a different type of hammer felt, or how their stringing is different from that of today, or if it's just that some of the Yamaha pianos from that time turned out better than others and those are the ones that have survived and been sold on.

I've played a few G-series grands from the 70s, and although they should be rubbish by now, they're often not. There is a particular clarity in the treble, and as you say a long a singing tone.

I suspect that it might be to do with after-care, or the in-house work that was done before the piano was sent out. Perhaps in those days there was more time spent on preparation, voicing, fine regulation, checking the strings on the bridge etc. These days a lot of that work is down to the shop, and not every shop does all the work necessary to bring the piano into optimal condition.

I honestly don't know if these older Yamahas were somehow better than new ones, but I suspect not. I suspect it's to do with care. The thing is that I have played new Yamahas that have been like stray dogs, and I have played new Yamahas that have been absolutely incredible, and in those cases it was definitely down to preparation.

Also, if a piano has been kept in a temperate climate for decades and had light use, and been attended to by a good technician for a lot/all of that time, it can result in an incredible piano.

There's a kind of dichotomy with pianos, and that's that new pianos are always better than old pianos. That's what the industry says, and that's what most technicians experiences are. But there's also that factor that comes into play that an older piano that has been well cared for and has not endured wild swings of humidity will develop a voice that a new piano does not yet have. I'm not, by the way, talking about a 100 year old Steinway (insert any other brand name here) that is clearly past its best and on which the brittle hammer felt will crumble as it strikes the tired strings.....

So, new pianos are better than old pianos, except in many cases where they're not. Go figure.... As I said before and will say again, a new piano is a raw product.

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Like Joseph mentioned, I'm inclined to agree that newer is better when it comes to acoustic pianos. That said, I have an older Yamaha C7, from 1978, that I absolutely love. Despite the age, and some wear, it still plays well, and sounds even better.

In fact, I've played some new/newer Steinway grand pianos, a B, an A, and a few Ds, and was thrilled with them. But when I got back home and played my C7, yea, the Steinways were better, but not head and shoulders better, in my view.

I've had it for several years now, and don't plan on getting rid of it and getting something better. I doubt very seriously that I could afford anything better. smile

As for the quality of the piano, my experience is limited, but I'd say, yes, the quality is very good, excellent, in fact.

On the other hand, newer is likely better, if you can afford new. smile

Rick


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Originally Posted by tony3304
Have you ever tried 1970 ~ 1980 Yamaha? All of them I tried were amazing good pianos.

Yes, my first piano was a 1986 Yamaha UX3 upright, it was a very nice piano. But before purchasing it we played around forty used Yamaha uprights and they all sounded and played differently to each other. Maybe there is a difference between Yamahas from the 70s to the 80s and between those and the 90s onwards, and again a difference between the standard U1/U3 models and the specials such as the UX3 but the problem is that those differences are no larger than the difference you get between one piano and another of the same type. That makes it difficult to make any meaningful generalisation - you just have to play as many as you can and judge each one on its merits.

Last edited by gwing; 01/24/21 01:50 PM.

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